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robman50

join:2010-12-14

1 edit
reply to robman50

Re: video card failing?

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Here are a bunch of pictures of the video card and the cooler.

robman50

join:2010-12-14

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and one more picture.


koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to robman50

The first thing I notice is how there's no HSF contact on any of the RAM modules. Some older (and even some present) video cards were designed this way, but vendors eventually realised that it's generally not a good idea. After-market coolers rarely address this (depends on what you get).

The second thing I notice is what appears to be an exposed TIM pad in this picture. I'm talking about "the silver square" on the back. I can't tell if it's TIM or foam or what -- there's no way for me to tell without physically inspecting it.

Did the original HSF that came with this card cover both sides of the card or "wrap around" the card (example)?

I'm also amused that there's no HSF coverage on the RAM (and the jury's still on on the TIM pad or whatever it is on the back), yet there are gold heatsinks on what are probably the VRMs. Heh.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


robman50

join:2010-12-14

That silver square feels soft. I thought it was to protect the back of the GPU because that cooler has a bracket that clamps on to the card.

»euroalps.eu/technology/Computing···ink.html

»www.gideontech.com/content/articles/303/1

The card came to me with an older computer system that I took in so I do not know much about the parts.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

I had no idea what the card looked like with the HSF assembled on it, so thank you for the pictures -- yes, it's just a foam pad then, not TIM. Pshew.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


robman50

join:2010-12-14

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Here is what the picture of the card on the cardboard box looks like.

robman50

join:2010-12-14
reply to koitsu

said by koitsu:

I had no idea what the card looked like with the HSF assembled on it, so thank you for the pictures -- yes, it's just a foam pad then, not TIM. Pshew.

I figured taking tons of pictures is better than taking to little.

robman50

join:2010-12-14

2 edits
reply to koitsu

I had to reset the BIOS back to defaults because the system was starting to lockup when the GPU temps where low.
Wow this box is just full of surprises. lol
What is the next item to test? I can test the HDD, RAM and thats about it. Don't own or have access to a multimeter to test the PSU. What are the chances of the CPU going bad? Maybe I just need to format and reinstall Windows XP?



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

I would say the CPU is probably not what's bad. You're able to boot into Windows and run GPU-Z and run VMT without crashes. Your pre-POST crashes could indicate a bad CPU, but I don't think so. A bad CPU causes massive havoc at almost all times, and the behaviour is usually noticed pre-POST, immediately after POST, or *definitely* as Windows boots/loads drivers.

You could test system RAM if you wanted using memtest86+ (download the pre-built ISO, burn it, boot it -- nothing else you need to do). Let it run until "Pass xx%" has exceeded 100% or has wrapped back to 0%. This usually takes a few hours. What you're looking for is something like this. If this tool locks up hard then the problem probably isn't RAM-related but rather "something else" (PSU, voltages, motherboard, etc. -- but not the GPU. GPU isn't heavily used in memtest86+, obviously).

PSU testing is only helpful is you can test the PSU while it's in use, i.e. an "inline" or "passive" test. I have one of these which is not an inline tester (this device has said "OK!" many times with PSUs which were absolutely 100% bad when put under even light load). I have a Fluke MM myself but I am completely/entirely afraid of anything pertaining to electricity (really!) so with PSUs I tend to just buy another and re-test.

If I had to take a wild guess at the mess of a system? It'd be that you have two actual problems:

1. Possibly bad motherboard. Northbridge or southbridge, VRMs, or some other anomaly (cracked traces somewhere between layers, etc.). This is really hard to diagnose, and often manifests itself as the system just flat out locking up hard. Since VRMs are involved, and those are what provide voltage to your GPU, its possible that a busted VRM could cause OCCT to report errors (since your video card is powered off the AGP bus, not off the PSU directly)

2. Your GPU is by far running way too hot. Rather than futz with this I would recommend just buying another video card. This is hard to do since you're limited to AGP (good luck finding AGP cards these days -- I'm sure some are still made but ha!).

Let me ask you something very bluntly: are you willing to replace the parts in this system with something more recent, assuming you can do so on a budget with some help (from me)? I have hardware right now which I could send you (mostly free of charge -- some you would need to pay for however) that could build you a reliable replacement system (Socket 775, PCI Express, etc.). Specifically: motherboard, CPU, and video card. The board uses DDR3 RAM (one of the few Socket 775s which do) and I don't have any of that for you, but it's *super* cheap right now. I have the details typed out and ready to so just say yes/no.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


robman50

join:2010-12-14

Well I have all ways thought that the motherboard was the problem. Would this type of problem come and go? Like well one day it would act up and then be good for a month or so?
About the video card, I can always put my old X800 (crossfire edition, still have no idea why I got that model) PCI Express card back in to the PCI Express slot (like how it was a few years ago).
I used memtest86+ tons of times in the past so yeah I boot it and just let it run for 2 passes.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

We don't know what the root cause of the problem is, so it's hard to say whether or not the issue can come and go. But yes, generally speaking with circuits and ICs and things like VRMs, an issue can indeed "come and go" depending on what the real (scientific) root cause is.

How would you insert a PCI Express card into an AGP slot? I was under the impression your motherboard only has an AGP slot, and I'm not aware of any motherboards that offer both PCI Express and AGP slots (I wouldn't be surprised if one existed, but still).

Let me know about my last paragraph too, please.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


robman50

join:2010-12-14

Its one of the joys of an hybrid board. It comes with AGP 8x and PCI express x4. Also DDR and DDR2 slots.

Here is the link for the full specs.
»www.asrock.com/mb/VIA/775Dual-880Pro/


robman50

join:2010-12-14
reply to koitsu

Going to run memtest86+ now, I tossed the image on to a floppy disk.


robman50

join:2010-12-14

said by robman50:

Going to run memtest86+ now, I tossed the image on to a floppy disk.

I ran it and I did 2 passes without errors. So the system RAM is good.

robman50

join:2010-12-14
reply to koitsu

said by koitsu:

Let me ask you something very bluntly: are you willing to replace the parts in this system with something more recent, assuming you can do so on a budget with some help (from me)? I have hardware right now which I could send you (mostly free of charge -- some you would need to pay for however) that could build you a reliable replacement system (Socket 775, PCI Express, etc.). Specifically: motherboard, CPU, and video card. The board uses DDR3 RAM (one of the few Socket 775s which do) and I don't have any of that for you, but it's *super* cheap right now. I have the details typed out and ready to so just say yes/no.

No thanks, that is okay. If it would to just die and not work any more I would just scrap this old P4 and replace it with my Core i5 2500k system that I just got to replace this old spare system.

robman50

join:2010-12-14

The Pentium 4 is mostly to test old hardware and run legacy programs that are not compatible with windows 7 x64. Also I use it from time to time to check out what is on all of the floppy disks I have since all my newer systems do not have an floppy controller. If I where to scrap this system it would be no loss for me.