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urbang33k

join:2010-02-13
Canada
kudos:1

1 edit

[TV] Wireshark - How-to HELP

How can I use wireshark to determine if there is a device on a FibeTV customers private network that is interfering/conflicting with the FIbeTV recievers and causing 'loss of signal'. IE, printers, GMOTE android app, virus/malware infected computers, etc.

If I could narrow down broadcasts from a specific private IP that would be awesome. I have wireshark on my laptop for work, but have never been instructed how to use it.

What approach would I take with this? Could someone post a basic step by step process? eg:

1 round up all the ip's for modem/receivers
2 turn on all computers and devices,
3 fire up wireshark
4 set a specific set of filters in wireshark???
5 look for ip that aren't a known fibetv component broadcasting traffic under the applied filters....

Is this possible to use wireshark in this manner?
--
Opinions and ideas expressed in my post are my own and in no way represent those of Bell Canada Enterprises, Bell Canada, Bell TV, Bell Internet, Bell Mobility, Bell Technical Solutions, Expertech, or any other partners under the BCE umbrella.


ruggs

join:2012-03-26
Ontario

I assume the coax runs are all straight runs and no taps... But I suggest to run the HPNA test still just to see the quality of the coax if applicable that being said, is it possible to sectionalize?
Remove all but what is needed for the system to work, and add a device 1 at a time to see if the issue comes up...


urbang33k

join:2010-02-13
Canada
kudos:1
reply to urbang33k

Ya it's not an access loop or isw issue. distance is well within spec. everything is newly changed from the new port on a different slot in the stinger to the modem. happens on a straight piece of coax and also on a single cat5. Issue is intermitent. Can't ever reproduce it while I'm there.

my money is on dirty hydro ( its a row townhouse ) or somehting is screwy on the private network in the house.

Im just trying to figure out wireshark and how to use it as a diagnostic tool for the purpose of hunting down an offending peice of cpe.
--
Opinions and ideas expressed in my post are my own and in no way represent those of Bell Canada Enterprises, Bell Canada, Bell TV, Bell Internet, Bell Mobility, Bell Technical Solutions, Expertech, or any other partners under the BCE umbrella.


brianiscool

join:2000-08-16
Tampa, FL
kudos:1
reply to urbang33k

You would need the ISP to do this. Fiber is highly secure and doubt anyone is tapping your fiber line without consent.


ruggs

join:2012-03-26
Ontario

I don't think its a ftth install


urbang33k

join:2010-02-13
Canada
kudos:1

1 edit
reply to urbang33k

Brianiscool,

By private network and ip's of course I mean in the 192.168.2.x range. Im not suggesting the interuption is coming from the public network(read internet).


SLAMtech

join:2009-12-03
kudos:1
reply to urbang33k

I could be wrong but I thought I read on here that some network printers can cause some interference with Fibe Tv, when connected through the sagemcom.


dimsum

join:2008-02-07
L1C0N5
reply to urbang33k

If you're getting a 'signal lost' error, it could be a few things.. Bad box, a bad coax leg, poor sync, or a cable issue. Unfortunately there's no way for a customer to test the coaxial network, yet, but once sagemcom fixes the Netinf test tool in the connection hub it will be much easier to determine where and what the problem is, if it's in fact in the house.

Call the number on the front of the receiver. No hold times, and they'll send a tech out asap.


urbang33k

join:2010-02-13
Canada
kudos:1

said by dimsum:

If you're getting a 'signal lost' error, it could be a few things.. Bad box, a bad coax leg, poor sync, or a cable issue. Unfortunately there's no way for a customer to test the coaxial network, yet, but once sagemcom fixes the Netinf test tool in the connection hub it will be much easier to determine where and what the problem is, if it's in fact in the house.

Call the number on the front of the receiver. No hold times, and they'll send a tech out asap.

I am a FibeTV tech and I am asking a very specific question regarding wireshark specifically and whether anyone knows if it can be used to determine if there are conflicting(with FibeTV) hardware/software running the customers LAN.

Yes SLAMtech, that issue does exist in the real world. So does use of specifc types of multicast apps, like GMOTE used on Android devices. Possibly a customer has a piece of software installed on a computer that they dont know about. etc.

Again, just to be clear. I'm trying to eliminate guess work here. I want to know if I can 'see' those interfering ip broadcasts on the customers internal IP network with my laptop plugged in running wireshark.

forget about wiring issues, and hidden splitters, and bad receivers. lets all stay on topic please

If anyone thinks what I'm asking can be done, great, please provide some insight.

If what I'm asking can't be done and you know it for a FACT, please provide a little insight there also.
--
Opinions and ideas expressed in my post are my own and in no way represent those of Bell Canada Enterprises, Bell Canada, Bell TV, Bell Internet, Bell Mobility, Bell Technical Solutions, Expertech, or any other partners under the BCE umbrella.


koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23
reply to urbang33k

1. I'm not familiar with FibeTV or what it is,
2. I am extremely familiar with Wireshark and am happy to explain to you bits/pieces of networking if you need it,
3. I need to understand exactly what it is you're looking for to be able to say whether or not Wireshark can help you. These description are simply too vague:

said by urbang33k:
How can I use wireshark to determine if there is a device on a FibeTV customers private network that is interfering/conflicting with the FIbeTV recievers and causing 'loss of signal'. IE, printers, GMOTE android app, virus/malware infected computers, etc.
said by urbang33k:
I am a FibeTV tech and I am asking a very specific question regarding wireshark specifically and whether anyone knows if it can be used to determine if there are conflicting(with FibeTV) hardware/software running the customers LAN.
If you could please be very, very specific and speak in IP network or networking terms (I'm talking OSI layer here) that would be great, otherwise I'm not 100% sure what you're asking. It almost sounds like you're asking "how do I determine if Device X and Device Y on a LAN segment are both trying to use the same IP address?" but I'm not sure because of the ambiguity of your question.

If you aren't familiar with networking -- I'm not talking about "IP addresses", I'm talking about protocols starting with layer 2 (ARP) all the way down to layer 4 (TCP/UDP) -- then I'm not sure I can help you at all, as I would be spending more time teaching you about IP networking than I would how to use Wireshark.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.

urbang33k

join:2010-02-13
Canada
kudos:1
reply to urbang33k

Koitsu

Thanks for your reply. I'm going to send you a private message later on today maybe/hopefully. You may very well be the kind of guy I need to talk to.



koitsu
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-16
Mountain View, CA
kudos:23

I've responded. I sort of (kind of) understand why you sent a PM instead of publicly asking questions, but for those following the thread:

The OP has provided a lot of "generalised" information points and indicates that he just has general field experience with some of these products. However, on the packet level, he's not familiar with what's going on.

In the PM at least **six** separate networking-related subjects were brought up. Those six: ARP, VLANs, IP unicast, IP multicast, IP broadcasting, and some "general IP protocol" stuff that I'd rather not get into. It would take me hours (minimum 2-3) to explain all of these things, and I pointed out that there are literally 3-4 week courses just on IP networking that cover one or two of these subjects. They aren't things you can explain in a page of text.

To quote part of my reply to the OP in my PM:

quote:
If I had to give you some advice on where to turn, it's pretty simple: you work for Bell Canada. I am absolutely 100% certain that somewhere within the bowels of Bell, you have very senior-level network technicians who are familiar with *all* of these things -- how the IPTV portion works ... , IP unicast vs. IP multicast, IP broadcasting (that's different than unicast and different than multicast!), and so on. I am also certain that within the bowels of Bell you have engineers who are familiar with the IPTV receiver products being deployed in the field -- when I say familiar I mean familiar with the inner workings of them -- and also who are familiar with the vendor of the product that makes them. I am 100% certain Bell has communication channels and contracts with those vendors.

As such, you should really turn to internal resources to get this solved. It sounds like it's a reproducible problem, and given what you're describing, to me it actually sounds like some kind of firmware bug in either the IPTV receivers being deployed at the customer's abodes, a firmware/software bug on the receiving end (meaning the concentrator at Bell that speaks to the IPTV receivers or decodes the frames/packets), or something else along those lines. If that turns out to be the case, the aforementioned communication liaisons can work this out with the vendor and get a patch of some sort.

Your general question: "can Wireshark help here?" The answer is yes, but you would need someone who is absolutely 100% familiar with how the IPTV device behaves on an IP level for the packet captures to be useful. Sending them to me won't help because I have zero familiarity with the product.

...

You need to do packet captures at 3 points:

1. The customer side (LAN side, facing IPTV receiver)
2. The IPTV receiver (facing Bell concentrator)
3. The Bell concentrator (facing the IPTV receiver)

Again: these have to be done SIMULTANEOUSLY. Because from what you describe, it sounds like the customer side may be sending something which the IPTV receiver "drops", or possibly the Bell concentrator side "drops". You won't know without seeing everything in between.

...

Reach out to internal resources first; drive this issue *hard* with your manager.
Just keeping everyone here in the thread informed.
--
Making life hard for others since 1977.
I speak for myself and not my employer/affiliates of my employer.


llort

@rogers.com
reply to urbang33k

Maybe the Quality Service team may be of use as they have good repair tips and seem to be on top of things. Shoot them a line...