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chamberc
Premium
join:2008-08-05
Irving, TX
reply to Anon

Re: Power non-payment shut-off question

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by fifty nine:

Wthe new smart meter method is better. No need for the utility to waste fuel to deal with deadbeats.

Maybe the poor non-payer is not in fact a deadbeat but a victim of a nation that still has almost an 8 percent unemployment rate.

Each of those are "victims" only of their own laziness.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
Reviews:
·Optimum Online

1 recommendation

reply to IowaCowboy

»www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjCDwetH4po


Karen Mantler singing about her experience with not paying her electric bill. I prefer the CD version, which is much slower and more pleasant to listen to.

JoelC707
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Lanett, AL
kudos:5
reply to alkizmo

said by alkizmo:

I doubt POCOs go up the pole to turn off power to residences.

I don't know about where you live, but here the POCO waits a LONG time before cutting power.

It depends on the circumstances. Our power was shut off for non-payment back in 04/05 or so. We had a fenced in front yard (there was a gate next to the pole also because of a Comcast power supply in the front yard) but there were also two dogs inside the fence. They went up in a bucket truck and literally cut the line in two (really the only option they had since we didn't have a smart meter yet).

Georgia Power would send out disconnect letter when you were two months past due and going on your third month. Basically you could have not paid for two months roughly and it would take getting to that third month before they would shut off power. I think they charged us a $250 fee for reconnect.


wowey

@videotron.ca
reply to UHF

said by UHF:

If my bill is due today (Tuesday), I will be disconnected no later than Friday. Usually it would be 8am Thursday. They don't screw around. My friends in Indiana found the same thing, power cut 48 hours after the bill was due. And they charged them $75 cash, the past due balance, plus the next months estimated bill to turn them back on.

Wow. You serious? I never missed a bill, but, know of a girl who gambled her money away instead of paying her electric bill. They only cut her after 4 months or so. Then they have to turn it back on (even if they don't pay) when the temp drops to a certain point. Then they can disconnect it again in spring after a certain temp rise.

Cut 48-hrs after a bill is due? That doesn't even sound legal (at least, it isn't legal here as far as I know, unless there's been some sort of previous years long paying issue).


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to chamberc

said by chamberc:

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by fifty nine:

Wthe new smart meter method is better. No need for the utility to waste fuel to deal with deadbeats.

Maybe the poor non-payer is not in fact a deadbeat but a victim of a nation that still has almost an 8 percent unemployment rate.

Each of those are "victims" only of their own laziness.

Really? Explain that logic so I can understand how someone who gets laid off or suffers a devastating illnes is a victim of their own laziness. You must be a member of the 1 percent club.


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
kudos:2
Reviews:
·voip.ms
·AT&T Midwest
·Time Warner Cable
reply to UHF

said by UHF:

Where I am, the day after the bill is due you get a 24 hour disconnect notice.

...

Because it's a municipal utility, most state regulations do not apply to them

I've listened in on their radio chatter, and I know they usually knock on the door and attempt to collect before pulling the meter.

1. In Wisconsin, that's not going to happen. If it did, I'd like to see the actual timeline and documentation. I had tenants regularly go two months before a disconnect. Lots of them. In the summer.

2. I am served by municipal water and sewer utilities, and all of the usual PSC rules apply to them. Why would they be exempted?

3. We Energies will knock on the door, but not to collect. They need to make sure that there is nobody there depending on electricity for medical needs. So if you want to get an extension, be home and fire up the nebulizer or the iron lung.
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Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

1 edit
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

Pretty much what I said.

But deadbeats who spend their money on the latest iPhone instead of their electric bill? Screw 'em.

New Jersey - There is a ban in place on disconnection for customers receiving Lifeline, LIHEAP, TANF, SSI, PAAD or GA. The law also protects households that may be unable to pay overdue amounts on their utilities because of medical expenses, unemployment, or recent death of spouse. These plans are in effect during the winter, and summer when the temperature is above 95. Customers eligible for the Winter Termination Protection Program are placed on a budget plan and cannot be disconnected as long as they make good faith payments on their heating bills. During the heating season, a utility may not ask for a security deposit. If a customer is eligible for the Winter Termination Program, and the high temperature is forecast to be 90o or more at any time during the following 48 hours, an electric utility shall not discontinue residential service to a customer for reasons of nonpayment of a delinquent account, or failure to comply with a deferred payment agreement, or failure to pay a cash security deposit or guarantee. Another rules states that disconnection is delayed for up to two months if physician certifies that health of household member would be adversely affected from the termination of service. Customer must enter into a payment plan with their energy provider Cannot disconnect unless the customer owes more than $50 or more than three months of charges.

Not exactly: Termination of service in NJ as many other states is not quite as easy as you make it seem. The compassionate bleeding hearts would have a fit to actually make some of them pay.

The law also protects households that may be unable to pay overdue amounts on their utilities because of medical expenses, unemployment, or recent death of spouse


nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to UHF

Here it depends. We have had tons of stuff with my elderly parents going on the last few years. Missed a payment majorly once (around a week for disconnect and out of town with mom) and when we got home the meter was changed out to a limited one. Forgot it was due with everything else going on. Couldn't run more than x amps. Fridge was fine but no AC. At least the tech doing it though shut heatpump circuit off as well has other high amp circuits and left on the smaller ones such as fridge. Think the charge was around 50 for missing the payment and truck run no other fees as long term customer. Reason pulled is we had missed a payment by a day in the last year another just too much to do so computer said we looked bad. So when out of town for moms emergency for a couple weeks looked bad as another payment missed. The live chat said we just were not best of best and if done manually would not have pulled the meter. Computers are great.



FL Guy

@mycingular.net

I'm in central Florida and have service though Progress Energy Florida and have no firsthand experience with their shutoff policy but my neighbor gets several visits a year. They average 60 days with lights followed by 30 days without. Thankfully they are a good distance away and only ask us for water. Only once did they ask to put a small fridge in our barn that is nearest their home. At that time they had 4 iPhones charging. The sympathy ran out quick. That panel is now locked up.



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

Really? Explain that logic so I can understand how someone who gets laid off or suffers a devastating illnes is a victim of their own laziness. You must be a member of the 1 percent club.

I can agree with chamberc to some extent. I know people personally who would rather collect an unemployment check than go out and do hard manual labor or do a job they think is demeaning. The 99 weeks of unemployment did that to a lot of people. I'm not saying everyone but I know of quite a few who are waiting for a mythical recovery that will get them back into a job that they had before they lost it.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

said by fifty nine:

Pretty much what I said.

But deadbeats who spend their money on the latest iPhone instead of their electric bill? Screw 'em.

New Jersey - There is a ban in place on disconnection for customers receiving Lifeline, LIHEAP, TANF, SSI, PAAD or GA. The law also protects households that may be unable to pay overdue amounts on their utilities because of medical expenses, unemployment, or recent death of spouse. These plans are in effect during the winter, and summer when the temperature is above 95. Customers eligible for the Winter Termination Protection Program are placed on a budget plan and cannot be disconnected as long as they make good faith payments on their heating bills. During the heating season, a utility may not ask for a security deposit. If a customer is eligible for the Winter Termination Program, and the high temperature is forecast to be 90o or more at any time during the following 48 hours, an electric utility shall not discontinue residential service to a customer for reasons of nonpayment of a delinquent account, or failure to comply with a deferred payment agreement, or failure to pay a cash security deposit or guarantee. Another rules states that disconnection is delayed for up to two months if physician certifies that health of household member would be adversely affected from the termination of service. Customer must enter into a payment plan with their energy provider Cannot disconnect unless the customer owes more than $50 or more than three months of charges.

Not exactly: Termination of service in NJ as many other states is not quite as easy as you make it seem. The compassionate bleeding hearts would have a fit to actually make some of them pay.

The law also protects households that may be unable to pay overdue amounts on their utilities because of medical expenses, unemployment, or recent death of spouse

To qualify for those programs you have to be pretty poor. The other exceptions are pretty specific - death of a spouse, unemployment or medical expenses. There are also two limited exemptions for emergencies - extreme heat and cold.

A "good faith payment" is 25% of your budget bill. The rest isn't forgiven - you still owe it.

I actually know people who have been disconnected for non-payment, and our co-op even had a feature on disconnection where someone had complained that they had ruined Christmas.

But people still get disconnected and 100% smart meter/AMR in our co-op territory lets them do it pretty easily. Better than having to deal with hostile homeowners who may even pull guns or dogs on utility workers who are just doing their job.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

said by Jack_in_VA:

Really? Explain that logic so I can understand how someone who gets laid off or suffers a devastating illnes is a victim of their own laziness. You must be a member of the 1 percent club.

I can agree with chamberc to some extent. I know people personally who would rather collect an unemployment check than go out and do hard manual labor or do a job they think is demeaning. The 99 weeks of unemployment did that to a lot of people. I'm not saying everyone but I know of quite a few who are waiting for a mythical recovery that will get them back into a job that they had before they lost it.

That's an easy answer for someone who still has a job, those with their own business and those like me who are retired. I don't blame someone to collect the unemployment for the 99 weeks. Your have to acknowledge there are no jobs except low paying menial type minimum wage.

Just today DOW Chemical announced the lay-offs of 2500, DuPont 1500. Just where do you think they are going to get any job with the pay and benefits? They aren't.

Would you not want a recovery to get back in a comparable job. You bet your ass you would. Just like the rest of us.

JoelC707
Premium
join:2002-07-09
Lanett, AL
kudos:5
reply to fifty nine

said by fifty nine:

said by Jack_in_VA:

Really? Explain that logic so I can understand how someone who gets laid off or suffers a devastating illnes is a victim of their own laziness. You must be a member of the 1 percent club.

I can agree with chamberc to some extent. I know people personally who would rather collect an unemployment check than go out and do hard manual labor or do a job they think is demeaning. The 99 weeks of unemployment did that to a lot of people. I'm not saying everyone but I know of quite a few who are waiting for a mythical recovery that will get them back into a job that they had before they lost it.

I can agree with you there but sometimes it's not the person's fault but rather the employer. Often times those "demeaning" jobs, even if they do apply for they will get turned down as "over qualified", especially if you've progressed to manager level or higher in a previous job. Granted every employer is different but it's an employers market right now with so many people out there they can afford to be picky most of the time and that leaves able bodied people out in the cold.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2

said by JoelC707:

I can agree with you there but sometimes it's not the person's fault but rather the employer. Often times those "demeaning" jobs, even if they do apply for they will get turned down as "over qualified", especially if you've progressed to manager level or higher in a previous job. Granted every employer is different but it's an employers market right now with so many people out there they can afford to be picky most of the time and that leaves able bodied people out in the cold.

I had a position to fill. It didn't pay what a similar position was paying during the good times. But it paid a good enough amount. I had quite a few applicants, and some of them wanted way more than what the job was offering... and yes, some were unemployed.

I didn't even mind if they took the job only to leave like 6 months to a year afterwards. But they preferred to stay unemployed (and collect unemployment I assume) rather than getting to work.