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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
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reply to sk1939

Re: Generator Time!!!

said by sk1939:

said by fifty nine:


Go ahead, hit a bump while smoking, it will be a load of fun.

He'd be lucky if he made it to the burn unit at Mass General Hospital. It be more likely that he'd be killed instantly.

That would cause instant third degree burns over 100 percent of his body. Many burn victims that sustain third degree burns on any part of their body have to endure lifelong disability because they never fully recover.

I used to watch Rescue 911 as a kid and burn victims never fully recover. Same on Medical reality shows. They are disfigured and live with lifelong pain that put them on a lifetime of being attached to morphine pumps.


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
reply to SwedishRider
I would be scared crazy to ride with someone with that setup!

Now as far as locking a generator down how do you lock one down if you don't have an anchor point?

a perfect point would of been the side of the house, this fat 4" pipe comes out but it's just a 90 degree bend and then that's it, I'm not sure if it's a vent or what.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
Dig a 4x4x4 hole, make a mold, pour concrete with a steel plate embedded inside, with a u-bolt coming out.

Heck you can build the concrete block to be an elevated pad for the generator as well.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to Daarken
said by Daarken:

Carbon Monoxide detectors only last up to 3 to 4 years, 5 years max. before failure.

End of life on most CO's is 7 years; most smoke detectors (both ionizing and photo-electric) is 10... Not to say replacing earlier is a bad idea - but the standard is 7.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to SwedishRider
I think the law in NYC says 7 years, and I think a lot of detectors will chirp when it's time to replace.

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to alkizmo
said by alkizmo:

Dig a 4x4x4 hole, make a mold, pour concrete with a steel plate embedded inside, with a u-bolt coming out.

Heck you can build the concrete block to be an elevated pad for the generator as well.

Man, you really wimp out

Me, I'd center the generator on the pad and cast three u-bolts on either side of the generator and run two hardened chains through each u-bolt before attaching the chains to the generator.

I'd also cast a conduit into the concrete for a contact switch which leads to a relay and battery-powered sirens - one indoors and one outdoors. Lift the generator (or some sort of cover installed that forces a would-be thief to move it first) and the siren goes off - the relay latches and prevents the sirens from being turned off by depressing the contact switch.


Toadman
Hypnotoad

join:2001-11-28
Ex Ohioan
kudos:1
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
reply to Coma
said by Coma:

said by IowaCowboy:

If you are fortunate to have a generator, make sure you lock it down with a heavy duty cable and lock.


I have mine locked up in my shop and today I got all the makings of a suicide cord.



I have a friend down in Kentucky that a few years ago they went through a good 4 day power outtage, and there were reports of Generator theft. What they were doing was taking a lawn mower, and starting up the lawn mower, and then shutting off the generator, so it didn't wake up the occupant. He ended up putting the gen back in the garage at night (not running) and always said that if someone was that interested during the day they could always say hi to his .38
--
This post is made with meat biproducts.


Daarken
Rara Avises
Premium
join:2005-01-12
Southwest LA
kudos:3
reply to LazMan
Your absolutely incorrect on that statement.
--
Getting it Done.


LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

1 edit
About which part? The co's having a life of 7 years? Or smokes at 10?

Either way, you want to explain it to me, as well as the manufacturer?

I will add a caveat - 7/10 years, or as per the manufacturer's instructions; whichever comes first...

------

Edit - supporting links:

»www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pyff···arm.html

How Long Should Your Smoke Alarm Last?

Smoke alarms have a useful life of about ten years. At that age they should be replaced, even if they seem to be working. This will assure that the alarm will be working when you need it.

»www.kiddecanada.com/utcfs/Templa···,00.html

Smoke Alarms
Kidde offers a wide range of smoke alarms to suit your needs. Two different technologies exist to detect smoke: ionization and photoelectric.

Own both types for complete protection. Dual sensor alarms are also available. Smoke alarms do wear out, replace your alarm every 10 years.

»www.firstalert.com/

DID YOU KNOW?

Carbon Monoxide Alarms should be replaced every 5-7 years.

Smoke Alarms should be replaced every 10 years.

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) recommends replacement to ensure the most effective protection and prevent nuissance alarms.


cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
said by LazMan:

Carbon Monoxide Alarms should be replaced every 5-7 years.

That makes sense as there is an ongoing chemical reaction. Furthermore, once a CO detector goes off it should be replaced.
said by LazMan:

Smoke Alarms should be replaced every 10 years.

With optical sensors I'd agree. LEDs dim in time and the photo sensor may be unable to detect the smoke.
Ionization sensors - makes no sense. The half-life of the Americium used is over 400 years. Furthermore if for some reason the flux of particles decreases (dust, smoke, reduction in activity) the alarm goes off. At most it will be more sensitive and maybe give false positives.


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
The ones we had that came with the house were going off, false alarm in the middle of the night, no smoke to trip them off.


Jackarino
YacCity
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join:2006-12-28
Allendale, NJ
kudos:1
Reviews:
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reply to SwedishRider
As some may know, I just picked up a 7500 Watt generator and when I first started it up I plugged in one lamp and it keep flickering. I let it run for 5+min and kept on flickering. I Tried different lamps, bulbs, etc. Thoughts?
--
Romney - Ryan 2012
Christie 2016


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
what was the lamp? CFL? being 7500W a small lamp is hardly a load, however I noticed most CFL's will flicker with on a generator, I did not have the right meter with me but I guess it's the AC cycle and if it's not a inverter generator that would be the case as well, but it's nothing to cry over.


dennismurphy
Put me on hold? I'll put YOU on hold
Premium
join:2002-11-19
Parsippany, NJ
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
said by Subaru:

what was the lamp? CFL? being 7500W a small lamp is hardly a load, however I noticed most CFL's will flicker with on a generator, I did not have the right meter with me but I guess it's the AC cycle and if it's not a inverter generator that would be the case as well, but it's nothing to cry over.

Instead of cfl's, I took the LED bulbs out of the hanging light in the kitchen and used them in a torch lamp during the outage. They were stead, bright, and drew very little wattage. I'm sold on the Philips LED bulbs - just have to get the cost down a bit ...


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
said by dennismurphy:

said by Subaru:

what was the lamp? CFL? being 7500W a small lamp is hardly a load, however I noticed most CFL's will flicker with on a generator, I did not have the right meter with me but I guess it's the AC cycle and if it's not a inverter generator that would be the case as well, but it's nothing to cry over.

Instead of cfl's, I took the LED bulbs out of the hanging light in the kitchen and used them in a torch lamp during the outage. They were stead, bright, and drew very little wattage. I'm sold on the Philips LED bulbs - just have to get the cost down a bit ...

They here at HD not just philips they really expanded the LED section a bit, I haven't looked at them but I will be soon because I want to replace the recessed light with an LED because the current Cree recessed light I have is a bit too big.
--
It's NOT Ni-kon It's NE-KON!




LG is NOT Lifes Good It's Lucky Goldstar!



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
reply to Subaru
said by Subaru:

what was the lamp? CFL? being 7500W a small lamp is hardly a load, however I noticed most CFL's will flicker with on a generator, I did not have the right meter with me but I guess it's the AC cycle and if it's not a inverter generator that would be the case as well, but it's nothing to cry over.

I use CFL's and they don't flicker but it could be the design of the alternator.


Subaru
1-3-2-4
Premium
join:2001-05-31
Greenwich, CT
kudos:1
could be


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
said by Subaru:

could be

It probably will smooth out with a heavier load.


Jackarino
YacCity
Premium
join:2006-12-28
Allendale, NJ
kudos:1
reply to Subaru
Its one of those new light bulbs


fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to Jackarino
said by Jackarino:

As some may know, I just picked up a 7500 Watt generator and when I first started it up I plugged in one lamp and it keep flickering. I let it run for 5+min and kept on flickering. I Tried different lamps, bulbs, etc. Thoughts?

That happens with CFLs on (non-inverter) generators. I've seen several of my neighbors with small portable generators have flickering CFLs.


Daarken
Rara Avises
Premium
join:2005-01-12
Southwest LA
kudos:3
reply to LazMan
My post was in reference to your remark about CO detectors.
I am fully aware of the "10 year" smoke detector, but in the past 18 years of working in the life safety industry, I have never seen one last beyond 6 or 7. Smoke detectors (not smoke alarms) last far longer then 10 years, and with proper cleaning will be trouble free.
CO detectors have been on the market for quite some time, but for the most part it is a fairley new technology. In 2008 when they 1st started to be produced at a consumer grade level, they only had a life span of 3 years or so. Now they max out at 7.
The CO detectors we sell and installed are manufactured by System Sensor. They have a complete resource page for any quesstions you might have about these devices. www.systemsensor.com
As for kiddie products,they have a broad line of detectors for many different types of applications. Thier warranty aslo varies with each model. The warranty ranges from 5 to 7 years. I do not have any in my home and nor would I recommend them. The type I have use and recommend are not purchased at your local box store or home improvement center.
--
Getting it Done.