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LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to battleop

Re: Cisco CRS with 100Gb line card

Turbines are awesome, but you are absolutely right about service and parts... As well as being tied to a specific vendor - there's 100's of companies that can service your average generator - turbines mean dealing with the company that built it almost exclusively....

OHSrob

join:2011-06-08
reply to cablegeek01
said by cablegeek01:

I finally got around to upgrading my old linksys WRT54G

Wow, I am assuming this is an internet service provider since I don't think much else would need that kind of bandwidth.

How many people run through that thing ?.

That thing has to be good for at least 180,000+ residential subscribers.

pb2k

join:2005-05-30
Calgary, AB
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TELUS
said by OHSrob:

said by cablegeek01:

I finally got around to upgrading my old linksys WRT54G

Wow, I am assuming this is an internet service provider since I don't think much else would need that kind of bandwidth.

How many people run through that thing ?.

That thing has to be good for at least 180,000+ residential subscribers.

Toss in a bit of over-subscription, and he should be able to offer 512bit/s and 1kb/s service! That should easily be enough to put the last of the morse code operators out of work (phfft, 55 bit/s is the best they can muster).

OHSrob

join:2011-06-08
said by pb2k:

said by OHSrob:

said by cablegeek01:

I finally got around to upgrading my old linksys WRT54G

Wow, I am assuming this is an internet service provider since I don't think much else would need that kind of bandwidth.

How many people run through that thing ?.

That thing has to be good for at least 180,000+ residential subscribers.

Toss in a bit of over-subscription, and he should be able to offer 512bit/s and 1kb/s service! That should easily be enough to put the last of the morse code operators out of work (phfft, 55 bit/s is the best they can muster).

You would be surprised how little bandwidth most of people use.

edit: that number was assuming a 5 megabit plan and I may have accidentally moved a decimal place.

pb2k

join:2005-05-30
Calgary, AB
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TELUS
said by OHSrob:

You would be surprised how little bandwidth most of people use.

Just think though... people might start wanting to stream erotic novels, and suddenly that 1kbit/s isn't going to be enough!

cmslick3

join:2004-05-24
Joliet, IL
reply to cablegeek01
Those tight bends at the fiber connectors can sometimes be a problem. However I would love to get ahold of a small portion of that BW.

Smokeshow
Premium
join:2009-02-26
Cold Lake, AB
reply to cablegeek01
Correct me if I am wrong, but those look like SC connectors on that fiber... Does that thing really only require 2 fibers to push 100G? I was under the impression that 100G used a total of 20 fibers for 10x 10G channels and typically used 2 ribbons of fiber with MTP connectors.

I've never seen anything of this magnitude though. Fastest I've worked with is 10G.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·T-Mobile US
·Verizon FiOS
reply to Smokeshow
said by Smokeshow:

Correct me if I am wrong, but those look like SC connectors on that fiber... Does that thing really only require 2 fibers to push 100G? I was under the impression that 100G used a total of 20 fibers for 10x 10G channels and typically used 2 ribbons of fiber with MTP connectors.

Back when 100G came out that was true, but it hasn't been the case with the advent of WDM and DWDM technology (pioneered I believe, with 40G ethernet).

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
That's still true for "SR" (multimode fiber), but who's going to do 100G on MM???

(It's more likely to use the SR optic to make a single 100G interface 10x10G interfaces.)


cablegeek01

join:2003-05-13
USA
kudos:1
reply to OHSrob
said by OHSrob:

said by cablegeek01:

I finally got around to upgrading my old linksys WRT54G

Wow, I am assuming this is an internet service provider since I don't think much else would need that kind of bandwidth.

How many people run through that thing ?.

That thing has to be good for at least 180,000+ residential subscribers.

Lets see....in its current configuration, it can support 140Gbps per slot, and there's 16 slots per chassis.
If we keep it simple and say that we'll use 50% for input and 50% for output, that's 2.24Tbps/2 =1.12Tbps of capacity.
If we follow the general rule that only 10% of the network users will be using the system at any given time, and we want to offer 50Mbps to each user....that's around 220,000 users per CSR3. If we wanted to get crazy and offer 100% guaranteed bandwidth to every user, we could support 22,400 users per chassis at 50Mbps to each user :-D

If you were offering 10Mbps service to each subscriber, you could see 1.1 million users per chassis, fully loaded.

pb2k

join:2005-05-30
Calgary, AB
kudos:1
Reviews:
·TELUS
said by cablegeek01:

said by OHSrob:

said by cablegeek01:

I finally got around to upgrading my old linksys WRT54G

Wow, I am assuming this is an internet service provider since I don't think much else would need that kind of bandwidth.

How many people run through that thing ?.

That thing has to be good for at least 180,000+ residential subscribers.

Lets see....in its current configuration, it can support 140Gbps per slot, and there's 16 slots per chassis.
If we keep it simple and say that we'll use 50% for input and 50% for output, that's 2.24Tbps/2 =1.12Tbps of capacity.
If we follow the general rule that only 10% of the network users will be using the system at any given time, and we want to offer 50Mbps to each user....that's around 220,000 users per CSR3. If we wanted to get crazy and offer 100% guaranteed bandwidth to every user, we could support 22,400 users per chassis at 50Mbps to each user :-D

If you were offering 10Mbps service to each subscriber, you could see 1.1 million users per chassis, fully loaded.

Am I the only one that found irony in quoting the op only mentions a wrt54g?


cablegeek01

join:2003-05-13
USA
kudos:1
lol, I hadn't noticed till now. Pretty funny.

Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2
reply to cablegeek01
I'll give you a dollar to press the red "RES" button on the ups.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
I'll do one better... see that big shinny read button behind the plastic next to the door...


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·T-Mobile US
·Verizon FiOS
said by cramer:

I'll do one better... see that big shinny read button behind the plastic next to the door...

I'll match his contribution.

Anybody remember when Haylon systems were predominant and you had to carry around a tank of air in case of emergency?

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
Yes. And I remember a time when an intern hit the orange, end-of-the-world button in a TX data center. (not only does it dump the halon, but it blows the "fusable links" to the room -- one inch bars of copper.) Our's were MUCH harder to hit -- the covers were held on by industrial velcro.

(The only other links I've seen "blow" were due to a dropped screw driver.)

TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to Hahausuck
said by Hahausuck:

I'll give you a dollar to press the red "RES" button on the ups.

Not much would happen, all pressing the reset button would do is clear all the recorded values/stats.

Hint: that device in the picture simply displays and records measurements for power consumption and power quality. Has nothing to do with any UPS.

Link: »www.eaton.com/Eaton/ProductsServ···ndex.htm

Hahausuck
Premium
join:2003-12-14
kudos:2
An some of the ones I have been around the red reset button cycles the unit. As in cuts the loads and restarts the ups.


TomS_
Git-r-done
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-19
London, UK
kudos:5

1 edit
reply to Smokeshow
said by Smokeshow:

I was under the impression that 100G used a total of 20 fibers for 10x 10G channels

There are a few ways to provide 100G, one as you say being 10x10G channels, either physical (using a ribbon fibre) or logical using multiple wavelengths over a single pair. Another is 4x25G in similar configurations.

It is also possible to 100G as a single channel, and Ive been involved in the deployment of some long haul transmission kit that is single wavelength 100G. On a DWDM line system with 80 channels, were talking 8tbit/sec. Thats some seriously sexy stuff.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
I wasn't aware of anyone doing single lambda 100G. Who's the vendor/manufacturer for those optics?


TomS_
Git-r-done
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-19
London, UK
kudos:5
Alcatel-Lucent.

They arent "optics" as such, more trans/muxponders.


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
Reviews:
·T-Mobile US
·Verizon FiOS
said by TomS_:

Alcatel-Lucent.

They arent "optics" as such, more trans/muxponders.

I've seen some of the equipment (carrier hotels), never been able to lay hands on it though (not my specialty/repsonsibility). Are the mux's still on the large side, or have they managed to shrink it a bit?


TomS_
Git-r-done
Premium,MVM
join:2002-07-19
London, UK
kudos:5
The ones Ive wroked with are the PSS-32 chassis, which is 19" wide an 13 or so RU (can just fit 3 of them in a rack). Ive worked more with muxponders than their transponders, and you can fit 5 of them in that chassis, so 50 x 10g = 500g line side per chassis x 3 = 1.5t per rack. Since the chassis is only about 300mm deep you can probably fit them front and back too.

Not sure if theres anything else more dense than that.


sk1939
Premium
join:2010-10-23
Mclean, VA
kudos:10
The one's I saw were 1/2 rack, so they've either shrunk somewhat, or have a lower capacity. Still, the amount of speed you have at the carrier level is amazing, I wonder what the link utilization is.