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Steve
I know your IP address
Consultant
join:2001-03-10
Foothill Ranch, CA
kudos:5

2 recommendations

reply to Mele20

Re: Some Guy Bought the Data of 1.1 Million Facebook Users

said by Mele20:

You can't buy even a SIX INCH Subway for $5 much less a foot long one!

Perhaps living in paradise insulates you from the Hell that the rest of us suffer through, but Subway does have a $5 footlong menu. I regularly get the black forest ham on footlong honey oat. Five bucks.

But I agree, who cares? Facebook users believe in living in completely glass houses and having zero privacy at all times and for all things. So, how is this news?

This data apparently came from apps (not Facebook itself) that users all volunteered for, and shows the danger of signing up for a Facebook app unless you really know about it.

One of the very reasons for success of Facebook was its early promotion of an API that allowed for third-party access, which opened the platform up to many apps that people apparently care about (I'm unable to say "Farmville" without throwing up in my mouth a little bit). I never really "got it" about this, but the world has decided that this was A Big Deal. MySpace didn't go this route, which in part explains why they're an also-ran.

There are contracts in place that limit what applications can do with the data they collect, but seeing the enormous proliferation of every kind of funky and useless app, it should be hard to believe that anybody is seriously policing this. Some apps provide a real value for the users, but others are clearly bogus.

How many of you have seen those invitations to see how many people have visited your profile, or how many have unfriended you, or the like? Those are all third-party Facebook APPS, and every time you have agreed to give those apps access to your information, you have given permission for some guy in Bulgaria to have your information.

Why would you do that?

In defense of Facebook, apps are not given permission to access your data without a clear and obvious dialog of consent, and the smart people Just Say No.

I have allowed only one trusted app. Others, I don't know about.
--
Stephen J. Friedl | Unix Wizard | Security Consultant | Orange County, California USA | my web site