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silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA

As expected....

Well this is no surprise. And the neighborhoods in Kansas City that were too poor or simply unpopulated enough to meet Google's perfect deployment strategy are going to go down in value. How wonderful of Google!

ISurfTooMuch

join:2007-04-23
Tuscaloosa, AL
If you were opening several stores in a city, would you scatter them randomly about, or would you locate them where they're likely to get the most business?

xenophon

join:2007-09-17

1 edit
reply to silbaco
Google gave all valid fiberhoods the option to register. It's just that the poorer hoods were less likely _interested_ to register. What's interesting is that low income hoods with many immigrants had high registration... it seems immigrants are more motivated by the potential (they came to America for opportunity) than non-immigrant low income hoods who don't recognize opportunity that is dangled directly in front of them.

Assuming Google stays in the ISP biz long term, is likely Google will wire up all hoods in the end but that the registration just set the priority. They already plan to expand to N and S KC in 2014.

It's actually surprising Google targeted most of the lowest income areas of KC metro to start with. They could have started with the highest income but only hit a portion of high income hoods of the metro. All of Johnson County (the highest income county of metro) is so far ignored. So you can't bash Google for ignoring low income areas as that is where they gave first opportunity. It's just that some didn't bite.


skeechan
Ai Otsukaholic
Premium
join:2012-01-26
AA169|170
kudos:2
reply to silbaco
If this were a telco, the editorial would be about evil Google redlining.


tshirt
Premium
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to xenophon
And as the housing/property price rises the poor get forced out and those homes and buildings get taken over by small businesses, at least until the roll out becomes more widespread, and the internet wanna be startups get culled.
If the few hundred dollars a month more for a standard highspeed connection or hosted server is the make or breakpoint of these small businesses then the increased rent/property value will promptly kill most of them off.

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA

3 edits
reply to ISurfTooMuch
Depends on the business and the situation. The place where you get the most business is not necessarily the place where you have the most people or the most money. It is the place where there is a high demand for what your business offers. Pharmacies for example are very often located in lower-income parts of town just as they are in higher-income parts of town. A person may start their own business in the any available building closest to their home. A manufacturing facility may locate to the place where they can find a reasonable amount of property for sale and key access to roads and may also dependent upon where the city lets them build. That may not be most populated neighborhoods.

Google fiber is a great project, but Kansas City might not have predicted just what the project will essentially do. It will raise property values where it is deployed, which can help some higher-income people and hurt some of the lower income at the same time. For businesses that need fast fiber, it will help. For a coffee shop that doesn't, could hurt with higher property taxes. But more importantly where it is not deployed, it will only lower them. It will make that house harder to sell and it will put businesses at a competitive disadvantage to others in the city. That could ultimately drive businesses out of the area where Google is not deploying and make the lower-income parts of the city even lower. Higher income parts will suffer from greatly decreased property values. That's not going to help anyone. It is creating a digital divide within a city. Digital divides hold back everyone.

iansltx

join:2007-02-19
Austin, TX
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
However the vast, vast majority of the cities' neighborhoods are getting wired.

Not all of them. Not yet anyway. But they all will be eventually...I guarantee Google will include the unserved fiberhoods in a future rally to give them another chance.

xenophon

join:2007-09-17
reply to tshirt
KCMO, KCK and the metro are huge in area. The entire metro will hardly be overly gentrified by this. KCK is the lowest income area of the metro - it needs this. If anything, some down and out hoods will get an economic boost with mild rent rate increase. Once Gfiber hits upper income hoods in KC, MO next spring (downtown, Plaza, Brookside, Ward Parkway) , this will probably be moot and the lower income hoods will at best see mild gentrification since they have access and other metro cities do not.

I won't be getting Gfiber until next Fall (Westport/Plaza area) but am hoping it raises condo values in my hood. Now is the time to buy in KC (at least in valid fiberhoods).


morbo
Complete Your Transaction

join:2002-01-22
00000
Reviews:
·Charter
reply to silbaco
It seems like you are just searching for a reason to complain. No one is suggesting that Google Fiber will cure all of mankind's problems (rich vs poor, etc). There will be no digital divide since the existing providers of DSL and cable internet will still provide those services to all areas.

silbaco
Premium
join:2009-08-03
USA
No digital divide? You don't consider 5-24mbps down/1-2mbps up DSL vs. ~1000/1000mbps a digital divide? It's like comparing dial-up to DSL, except we are dealing with higher numbers.

openbox9
Premium
join:2004-01-26
Germany
kudos:2
reply to ISurfTooMuch
Redlining...cough, err, wait a minute?