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signcarver

join:2005-03-20
Phoenix, AZ
reply to RandomBlue

Re: [AR] Outages, slowdowns and question about UPS usage.

I think the no surge suppressor thing was generally for the cable itself as some can block or interfere with signals but if you have no problems using it (compared to not using it) I would probably want to err on the side of protecting my equipment vs an occasional packet loss as the 2nd doesn't cost me money but I'm out $100 if the modem is fried.

Though my feeling is more on the rf side of not using the power strip, the issue could also be electrical. One of my homes is in an area with poor ground (new homes now require a whole house grounding system rather than just a couple of grounding rods) and as a result, in the older houses (though none are older than 15 years), electronics in that area go out quickly and I've seen the following problem occur even on single level houses from one end to the other. It used to be in networking we were taught not to run cat5 vertically and use fiber between floors (and buildings) as it increased the likelihood that the ground differential (potential ?) was different between one floor (or building) and the other... as transmission speeds increased this became more of a problem since the voltage levels (bits) aren't true on/off but differences in ups and downs so they don't have to wait for the voltage to drop or rise completely. In theory surge protectors/ups's can also disrupt this but I would say generally there would not be a problem.

So it would not surprise me if a cable tech who has had some training would pick up on the idea of not using UPS's and surge protectors on the networking equipment as they are a possible problem... I just don't think they are that likely to cause a problem in most homes.

RandomBlue

join:2012-10-30
Rogers, AR
said by signcarver:

I think the no surge suppressor thing was generally for the cable itself as some can block or interfere with signals but if you have no problems using it (compared to not using it) I would probably want to err on the side of protecting my equipment vs an occasional packet loss as the 2nd doesn't cost me money but I'm out $100 if the modem is fried.

Yeah, he was talking solely about running the power through surge protectors and UPSes. I had mine hooked up to a decent size APC UPS and I'm going to switch it back. I never run RF through them.

I swapped out the modem to a Cisco DPC3010 and both modems are now seeing about 1% packet loss that happens in bursts of 3-4 lost packets every 12-15 minutes or so, which equates to 3-4 seconds of lost connectivity.

Both modems display the same issue with about the same frequency, though with the Cisco I get better signal and I'm bonding 5 channels instead of 4. Guess I'll have to set up yet another service call.

Here's the Cisco's signal info:

Model: Cisco DPC3010
Vendor: Cisco
Hardware Revision: 1.0
Bootloader Revision: 2.3.0_R1
Current Software Revision: DPC3010-v302r12901-110714a-CHR
Firmware Name: dpc3010-v302r12901-110714a-CHR.bin
Firmware Build Time: Jul 14 10:56:53 2011
Cable Modem Status: Operational

Downstream Channels
Power Level: Signal to Noise Ratio:
Channel 1: 0.3 dBmV 41.5 dB
Channel 2: 0.0 dBmV 41.1 dB
Channel 3: 0.0 dBmV 41.9 dB
Channel 4: 0.0 dBmV 41.5 dB
Channel 5: -1.1 dBmV 41.4 dB
Channel 6: 0.0 dBmV 0.0 dB
Channel 7: 0.0 dBmV 0.0 dB
Channel 8: 0.0 dBmV 0.0 dB

Upstream Channels
Power Level:
Channel 1: 44.5 dBmV
Channel 2: 0.0 dBmV
Channel 3: 0.0 dBmV
Channel 4: 0.0 dBmV