dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
17
share rss forum feed


nunya
LXI 483
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:13
Reviews:
·Charter
·voip.ms
reply to Frink

Re: Generator doesn't work with Direct Vent Hot Water Heater

Most portable generators come with a neutral / ground bond jumper inside the generator panel. In certain situations, removing the neutral - ground bond may be desirable.
For situations where the portable generator is feeding equipment directly out of its on-board receptacles, a bond is desired.

Did you buy this generator new? If it's used, someone may have defeated the bonding jumper for feeding a transfer switch with an un-switched neutral.
Without the specific model number (and manual) to your generator, we are just pissing in the wind.

Although not required when using a portable generator with extensions, I prefer to ground the chassis to the house ground rod if powering any appliance within the home.

A piece of wire stuck in the ground a few inches is not an acceptable ground under any circumstance.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
said by nunya:

Most portable generators come with a neutral / ground bond jumper inside the generator panel

I'm not so sure that most generators come with a N/G bond actually. My 6K watt Sportsman doesn't, and when I brought my testing meter to Lowe's many months ago just out of curiosity, a grand total of zero floor demo models had a N/G bond.

I'm not sure if the manufacturers assume that homeowners will have the bond in their panel (as that's what most homeowners buy generators for) or some other reason, but I'm inclined to think that most generators available in the hardware stores do not have a N/G bond from the factory.

Zach1
Premium
join:2006-11-26
NW Minnesota
said by SwedishRider:

said by nunya:

Most portable generators come with a neutral / ground bond jumper inside the generator panel

I'm not so sure that most generators come with a N/G bond actually. My 6K watt Sportsman doesn't, and when I brought my testing meter to Lowe's many months ago just out of curiosity, a grand total of zero floor demo models had a N/G bond.

I'm not sure if the manufacturers assume that homeowners will have the bond in their panel (as that's what most homeowners buy generators for) or some other reason, but I'm inclined to think that most generators available in the hardware stores do not have a N/G bond from the factory.

Some manufacturers will provide a jumper and instructions on how to connect it. It seems, more often than not, if the generator manufacturer provides GFCI protection on, at least, the 120V 15-20A receptacles, there is either a bond connected at the factory or a factory supplied provision for it. That NOT to say there aren't some without GFCI protection that are bonded or some with GFCI protection lack a bond and/or a provision for it.

A floating system is, in many cases, considerably safer when using portable cord and plug connected equipment since there isn't a return path from either circuit conductor to ground. Once the neutral is bonded to ground, the potential for a ground-fault (faulty cords, tools etc) exists even if the genny is only sitting on the damp ground without connection to a grounding electrode. The danger becomes the same as using a non-GFCI protected receptacle powered by the utility.

Looking at some of the suggestions made on Internet forums seems to suggest that many don't quite understand that electricity from a generator will kill someone just as dead as electricity provided by the POCO. Electricity+inexperience+tiredness+darkness+dampness can equal a death statistic.
--
Zach


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by Zach1:

A floating system is, in many cases, considerably safer when using portable cord and plug connected equipment since there isn't a return path from either circuit conductor to ground. Once the neutral is bonded to ground, the potential for a ground-fault (faulty cords, tools etc) exists even if the genny is only sitting on the damp ground without connection to a grounding electrode.

Ok, maybe that's the part that confused me about floating neutral generators.

Are you saying that if a generator has floating neutral, and I touch a hot conductor from that generator, I will NOT get shocked because the neutral of the generator isn't touching the ground (Hence no return path)??