dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
4
share rss forum feed

sandman_1

join:2011-04-23
11111
reply to NormanS

Re: [Newsgroups] Dutch Usenet services are doomed

said by NormanS:

Just wondering why I should pay to download, knowing that the IP owners won't get a penny of the money I spend to watch their shows after a Usenet download.

I think if they got rid of the pay-walls then people would buy their content. Some people who have pulled-the-plug on cable so to speak, can't view a lot of the shows they may like on the outlets you gave. Most online access is blocked to those without a existing cable subscription and even an Internet subscription with a ISP that has a contract with the content company.

It is the Content and Cable companies purposely placing these restrictions in place to save their out-dated business model in the age of the Internet. Content companies have gone even further to hindering legit access to content by placing restrictions on Netflix and Redbox such as making them wait up to 56 days to get some DVD releases. Also Cable companies act in kind by implementing data caps knowing full well that this will stifle adoption of streamed content over the Internet, which is a threat to their overpriced streaming version.

I just can't feel sorry for companies that act so uncompetitively.


mmainprize

join:2001-12-06
Houghton Lake, MI
Reviews:
·Charter
said by sandman_1:

said by NormanS:

Just wondering why I should pay to download, knowing that the IP owners won't get a penny of the money I spend to watch their shows after a Usenet download.

I think if they got rid of the pay-walls then people would buy their content. Some people who have pulled-the-plug on cable so to speak, can't view a lot of the shows they may like on the outlets you gave. Most online access is blocked to those without a existing cable subscription and even an Internet subscription with a ISP that has a contract with the content company.

It is the Content and Cable companies purposely placing these restrictions in place to save their out-dated business model in the age of the Internet. Content companies have gone even further to hindering legit access to content by placing restrictions on Netflix and Redbox such as making them wait up to 56 days to get some DVD releases. Also Cable companies act in kind by implementing data caps knowing full well that this will stifle adoption of streamed content over the Internet, which is a threat to their overpriced streaming version.

I just can't feel sorry for companies that act so uncompetitively.

You have hit the nail on the head. I could not agree more.

This year it is the worst it has been. the shows i like are all on at the same time on the same day on 3 different channels. I have to chose what show i watch, what show i DVR and the other one i have to watch on demand. I can only watch the DVR show on that box/TV, same with ondemand.
One of the shows is not on "on demand" so that one has to be DVR'ed. When i do watch on demand, it has fast forward blocked and i must watch the ads that are in most cases not current as it will keep telling me to watch the next show coming on next. If i watch half of the show i must watch it again on demand. The popular shows are now, 27 minutes of show, and 33 minutes ads.

It is for reasons like these that many people will just download the shows they like, and they have no ads, they can be watched on any TV/device at any time i like. If i have to pay for TV channels, why do the channels have to have ads?.
Once i can do that with the cable system or the internet then the downloading will stop.

Rojo

join:2009-04-14
New York, NY
kudos:1
When cable first came out, to compete with over-the-air broadcasting, it was called "Pay-TV" and its big selling point was "No ads!!"

Look at it now...


mmainprize

join:2001-12-06
Houghton Lake, MI
Reviews:
·Charter
said by Rojo:

When cable first came out, to compete with over-the-air broadcasting, it was called "Pay-TV" and its big selling point was "No ads!!"

Look at it now...

Yes it is a mess.
We seem to be off topic, but i can't help myself.
I remember on the weekends i use to get up and watch cartoons and the 3 stooges until lunch when i was a kid.

Now on the weekends i can't find anything good to watch before lunch (Even with 200 channels) and most things are paid ads that are one hour long one after another, channel after channel. Same thing in the late hour at night.

The cable system forces these high number of channels on us and that is what has increased the cost for the basic, or higher packages. Most of these channels would not be able to stay on the air if it was not forced on us by the cable company packages. I like many others, only really watch about 20 to 25 of the channels, and the other 150 or so i don't really need.

The system is set up to make you pay for hundreds of channels you don't watch or need, and the cable company fights tooth and nail to keep it that way.

newster

join:2011-09-26

1 edit
And to make matters worse, the quality of cable TV programming has declined significantly since the late 1990s. Virtually all the subject-type channels that started out with a narrow focus have completely abandoned the concept. The non-fiction stations have either shut down (like TechTV) or descended into trashy "reality" shows like TLC (they don't dare call it The Learning Channel anymore). Even CNN, once a respected news organization, dove into the tabloid field of celebrity gossip and child murders.

I'd really hate to imagine what American cable TV programming might be like 10 or 20 years from now. (Idiocracy could be a lot closer than we think) Hopefully by that time everything will be available online, legally, and we won't be called pirates anymore for wanting to watch something that's not available where we live.