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nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to Eyeballs

Re: File a homeowner's claim or not?

said by Eyeballs:

Careful in MA. Inquiries, for some reason count as claims. Whether you actually get a check for the damage or not. Two claims and they cancel your policy, and your stuck going on the state plan, which is expensive.

If it's close to your deductible, don't even cal them.

Two claims in what period of time. I had half a roof replaced years ago. Then the full roof within the last couple years. Still have a policy at a decent rate. Now yes if it is close to the deductible I dont file a claim for small stuff.
My mom filed claims for everything and when we got POA her homeowners insurance price sucked big time. Still she was a proud long term customer and they paid her claims. Thing is her deductible and cost of the policy was ridiculous. Had a hard time re-insuring her at a semi normal cost.


Eyeballs
Premium
join:2000-04-25
Worcester, MA
said by nonymous:

said by Eyeballs:

Careful in MA. Inquiries, for some reason count as claims. Whether you actually get a check for the damage or not. Two claims and they cancel your policy, and your stuck going on the state plan, which is expensive.

If it's close to your deductible, don't even cal them.

Two claims in what period of time. I had half a roof replaced years ago. Then the full roof within the last couple years. Still have a policy at a decent rate. Now yes if it is close to the deductible I dont file a claim for small stuff.
My mom filed claims for everything and when we got POA her homeowners insurance price sucked big time. Still she was a proud long term customer and they paid her claims. Thing is her deductible and cost of the policy was ridiculous. Had a hard time re-insuring her at a semi normal cost.

One person I work with had 2 claims in 3 years when he was dropped. One was a major claim, 20K in fire damage, the other was not. Under 2k.
--
Team Discovery--BBR Team Helix--Cuz I Care!!


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX

1 edit
reply to Dexter
duplicate

delete


mityfowl
Premium
join:2000-11-06
Dallas, TX
reply to Dexter
Two claims in 1 calender year got me bounced.

8 previous years with the same company and nary a claim before.

1 weather, 1 personal property (break in, robbed).


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to Jack_in_VA
said by Jack_in_VA:

You obviously don't know or have never had a substantial loss. The "pencil pusher" is actually a trained adjuster knowledgeable in the damage he or she is looking for.

Several years ago we had a hail storm that came through and required replacement of our roof and siding. The claim was about $15k. Not huge, but not trivial either. I had to point out the hail damage on the roof, but once I did it was clear it was damaged. It's not difficult to find stories on the internet of similar cases where a roofer or other contractor had to work with the adjustor to substantiate the claim. Sure some of the cases I'm sure was the contractor was stretching things for their own benefit. But I'm sure in many cases it was also things that that the adjustor didn't know, see, or catch.

In Indiana, the requirements for an adjustor are fairly basic and require about a week of classes. I'm fairly confident that a week's worth of classes is not enough to learn everything there is to know about property damage.

I'll stand by what I originally said.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
And I'll stand by my observation. When the company brings in an adjuster from Hawaii then he's no run of the mill pencil pusher.

As far as a roof it's a standard depending on size and type of shingles. Siding also. Not rocket science


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
reply to Dexter
They could fly in people from other places to help handle the volume or because they know the process better so they can handle stuff better. No one really knows why but you can't assume it means they have any more experience then the next guy just as you can't discount it. They bring in power workers from 2-3 states away when stuff like that happens. Is it because those people are better or have more experience? Nope! They just need them for the higher volume to get stuff done faster. I wouldn't read into out of state workers personally.
--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
You could say the same about figuring the cost of replacing shingles on a roof. Like I said not rocket science and the cost of shingles and labor is well known by insurance companies.


cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
said by Jack_in_VA:

You could say the same about figuring the cost of replacing shingles on a roof. Like I said not rocket science and the cost of shingles and labor is well known by insurance companies.

My point wasn't at the estimating the cost of what it takes to fix a repair. There are tables, formulas, and software not to mention experience to guide the adjuster there.

In the OP's case, the pane of glass and the gutter are pretty easy to see. The foundation may be a little harder. But what caused the foundation to crack? Was it compressive forces from the roof/wall down? Or sheer forces from a side impact? Was the footer damaged? Structurally was the wall, joists, or rafters damaged? Was any of the roof sheeting damaged but no outward signs of damage to the shingles? Was there water damage inside the wall?

The adjustor typically works for the insurance company. They have a vested interest in paying no more then absolutely necessary if they can. Feel free to just do whatever they recommend. I'd still get a 2nd and/or 3rd opinions from someone who uses their hands to do more than just pick up a clipboard, pencil, paper, and a tape measure.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom
said by cdru:

The adjustor typically works for the insurance company. They have a vested interest in paying no more then absolutely necessary if they can. Feel free to just do whatever they recommend. I'd still get a 2nd and/or 3rd opinions from someone who uses their hands to do more than just pick up a clipboard, pencil, paper, and a tape measure.

That is not necessarily true. When the adjuster allows $3600 on a $4000 heat pump that's 8 years old he's not screwing the policyholder.

In the OP's case most adjusters are fully capable of making a determination. If not they will get expert opinions

I know from experience and don't share your negativism or this is the MO for cut rate companies.

nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to cdru
said by cdru:

said by Jack_in_VA:

You obviously don't know or have never had a substantial loss. The "pencil pusher" is actually a trained adjuster knowledgeable in the damage he or she is looking for.

Several years ago we had a hail storm that came through and required replacement of our roof and siding. The claim was about $15k. Not huge, but not trivial either. I had to point out the hail damage on the roof, but once I did it was clear it was damaged. It's not difficult to find stories on the internet of similar cases where a roofer or other contractor had to work with the adjustor to substantiate the claim. Sure some of the cases I'm sure was the contractor was stretching things for their own benefit. But I'm sure in many cases it was also things that that the adjustor didn't know, see, or catch.

In Indiana, the requirements for an adjustor are fairly basic and require about a week of classes. I'm fairly confident that a week's worth of classes is not enough to learn everything there is to know about property damage.

I'll stand by what I originally said.

I did decent on my roof from the hail damage. they couldn't question it as the whole street was getting their roof done as was a whole bunch of places in Phoenix metro.
They even did well on the cost. So little work for roofers at the time that when this hit they jumped. Only issue we had was getting a real roofer. But since no rush as no leaks we found one and got in line. Local license and bonded not one that followed the storm. Though one out of another AZ town almost won us over.
Both were roofers though and not some other trade needing any work.


BronsCon

join:2003-10-24
Walnut Creek, CA
reply to Dexter
It looks like Sandy not only downed your tree, it upped your lawn!!

bmilone2

join:2001-01-26
Mays Landing, NJ
reply to Dexter
Insurance premiums are cyclical based on large payouts that hit the insurance carriers. Many times after a large natural disaster such Sandy you will find that within a year to 18 months afterward homeowner premium costs will go up. The insurance Carriers make a determination as to what percentage of increase is needed to replace the payout over a certain period of time. Once they make up their "losses" rates start to fall again. It happened that way after Katrina and a number of years before that when Florida had multiple storms.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to Dexter
I have had the same renters insurance (Traveler's) for almost ten years and I have a generous loss free credit that wards off any evil rate increases as I have been paying the same $16 per month since 2003. Insurance rates have gone up over the years with four hurricanes in Florida in 2004, the 2005 Hurricane season (hint: Katrina), the April 2011 tornadoes in the south, the Joplin tornado, the Springfield (MA) tornado, Irene, and now Sandy. These are all factored into the decision to raise rates for homeowners insurance as a whole. Check your insurance bill as you may have a loss free credit (which you may lose if you file a claim). I might have been able to recover lost food in the October snowstorm on my insurance but did not as it would give them an excuse to raise rates.

Several insurance companies decided to no longer underwrite insurance policies in Florida with it being the Sunshine (aka. Hurricane) state. It used to be difficult and expensive to get auto insurance in Massachusetts until some reforms at the state level kicked in.

When hurricane Andrew hit in Florida in 1992, I heard reports that insurance companies went bankrupt. I was only 8 years old at the time.
--
Romney-Ryan and Scott Brown are the Right Choice as they are Hope & Change you can count on.


dennismurphy
Put me on hold? I'll put YOU on hold
Premium
join:2002-11-19
Parsippany, NJ
kudos:3
Not all claims will count against you.

I had a claim for sump backup damage after Irene last year and my rate has not changed, and in fact, I still receive a Claim-Free Discount on my homeowners' policy.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
said by dennismurphy:

Not all claims will count against you.

I had a claim for sump backup damage after Irene last year and my rate has not changed, and in fact, I still receive a Claim-Free Discount on my homeowners' policy.

It also might depend on if the insurance company can subrogate with a third party (for example, if a faulty coffee maker that has been since recalled starts a fire and the insurance company pays the homeowner/tenant for the loss and then goes to recover the loss off the manufacturer).

I have been in many car accidents where I was NOT at fault and I filed a claim on my insurance and they go after the at fault driver's insurance. This process is known as subrogation. I live in a no-fault state so you have to file on your own insurance.

You cannot subrogate a weather loss since we cannot control the weather. As for your rates not going up, it depend on your contract with the insurer. Some will raise rates just for inquiring about whether to fie a claim (which I think the OP is worried about).
--
Romney-Ryan and Scott Brown are the Right Choice as they are Hope & Change you can count on.