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slajoh01

join:2005-04-23

1 recommendation

reply to Anon

Re: Do you still use Windows?

As for IE, I dont think its secure in its "default settings" BUT, however, it can be more secure with granular lockdown policies via the MMC console within Windows. Which is often overlooked here. And via the Local Security Policy settings.



planet

join:2001-11-05
Oz
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Cox HSI

1 recommendation

reply to dave

I have 3 PCs running windows. The one I trust the most is running, MSE & Faronics AntiExecutable with Windows FW w/Sphinx software control+router. Also, I'm running Fx with NoScript and Adblock Plus on all 3 PCs. All run in a LUA environment unless I have programs to install or WU.
That said:
I also have an IPad w/o any adjunct security options aside from the OS's inherent structure (not jailbroke). My wife loves the IPad since it is easy to use. She can't stand using the Windows PCs with the added security (especially NoScipt blocking Javascript here and there).
Also,
I use a Linux Live CD for my more sensitive needs and I've experimented with Kevin and Nancy's Operating System (KNOS) which boots from a DVD (in my case) and is also bootable from a flashdrive.

That all being said, I don't use the IPad for sensitive anything since I don't know when and if I might be hit with some form of malware. I have some security sense with my windows PCs. There isn't any security available for the IPad as of yet. If you are willing to learn then most OSs are able to be secured (nothing is 100%). Though, most people prefer to have PCs work out of the box.



workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to slajoh01

said by slajoh01:

I'd say dont overload with soooo soooo much security software.
Any IT securtiy gurus will tell u that even they do not run any AV software with minimum security software and dont get even hacked....

Just go with the basics...

Patch, AV, Firewall router, enable Windows FW, and avoid social engineering attacks and ur all set.

Users tend to bloat their machines up with security software.

Just patch, hardware FW with Windows FW enabled and dont click on any suspicious links or attachments. Thats all.

Windows is aint that bad, but it takes more effort to secure it and lock it down.
i

Agreed 100%.

I just run as a limited user, UAC on and MS Security Essentials.

Dave
--
I may have been born yesterday. But it wasn't at night.


jaykaykay
4 Ever Young
Premium,MVM
join:2000-04-13
USA
kudos:24
reply to workablob

»en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_SteadyState



Mike
Premium,Mod
join:2000-09-17
Pittsburgh, PA
kudos:1

Steady State was discontinued. I think it only works up to XP as well.

It was ineffective when I played with it. Faronics Deep Freeze was/is a ton better.



workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Comcast

Worked a treat for me in XP and then Vista. It can be downloaded still just not at MS.

»download.cnet.com/Windows-Steady···620af133

But, I use DeepFreeze now and it IS better.

Dave
--
I may have been born yesterday. But it wasn't at night.

Expand your moderator at work


redxii
Premium,Mod
join:2001-02-26
Sherwood, MI

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

Re: Do you still use Windows?

Not sure how it gets any simpler than Windows, you can already run/install anything you want where you want with a couple of clicks. It's so simple to run anything that's why there is anti-virus. Viruses aren't magic, they use the same APIs as legitimate programs and anti-malware programs are one way to distinguish and block them (but only if they are known).

I use Windows because it is really simple (and gaming). In Linux I don't really get a choice where to install something (I put games for instance on a different disk/partition) & every time I try it I have to compile the kernel to get it to boot without kernel parameter hacks, not simple at all.

You should also consider encryption for that data if you haven't already.
--
Moe, I need your advice… See I've got this friend named Joey Joe-Joe... Junior... Shabadoo..



Blogger
Jedi Poster
Premium
join:2012-10-18
Reviews:
·Champion Broadba..

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

said by GlassyMcPete:

Is there and OS that is simpler than Windows in what it does and what it installs where and where the user the can easily be in control or what is happening on the machine she owns?

I'm not trying to diss WIndows and although it is very targeted (for obvious reasons -- everyone uses it), I really don't feel like I am in control of what goes on on my computer which worries me since I have tax data, customer info, etc.

Thanks.
Glasin McPeterson

Strictly in the context of the above and also to have an OS and computer that runs all most all of the things the most users run, except for hard core gaming, IMO OS X on a Mac is unquestionably far and away the best option to go with.

Just my two-cents worth.


KodiacZiller
Premium
join:2008-09-04
73368
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

It's true that all OS's can be vulnerable. Code is code and all of it will have flaws no matter who writes it. All three major OS's are monolithic kernels and, as a result, have huge trusted computing bases (i.e. millions of LOC run in kernel mode). Windows can be secure, but it takes a lot of work and a lot of hassle (and often times money).

Both OS's nowadays follow the user/root DAC security model. So they are basically the same there. In the past it was difficult to make Windows behave within a "LUA" but that is pretty much not an issue with Win 7-8 since most apps now work without breaking. A problem is that many Windows users still refuse to use a LUA. On Linux, you really have no choice in the default install.

However, Linux has one huge security advantage -- it's a walled gardens of sorts. Windows has no concept of package management, which means it is up to the user to decide if such and such program is malicious. With Linux, you simply install packages from the repository store and you can be ensured they're not malicious.

Advanced users can compile their own kernels to lessen their security footprint (i.e. take out stuff not needed). This is not possible on Windows.

Linux also has various MAC security systems which Windows doesn't really have (Windows has nothing like SELinux, for example). These tools are extremely powerful.

Linux workstations don't need a firewall since there's no listening ports by default. Of course, there is a firewall available if one is needed for some reason.

Linux also has an advantage of having security updates pushed immediately (a day or two usually). Windows only updates once a month unless the security vuln is highly critical and being exploited widely.

Both OS's have Java, which is the same between them. Exploit Java on one platform and it will work on the other. The same goes for the browsers -- security vulns will be cross-platform most of the time (with minor tweaks needed for exploits). Chrome is an exception because its sandboxing techniques are different (and more secure) on Linux.

Windows now has DEP/ASLR support. Linux has had it since 2000. The implementations are different and some say Linux's is stronger by default, although with EMET this might not be an issue.

So basically, Linux in its default configuration is more secure, imo. Windows takes a lot more work and a lot more diligence (i.e. AV, firewalls, anti-executable, etc.) Linux allows you to setup a machine for your grandmother and not have to worry much about her becoming compromised.
--
Getting people to stop using windows is more or less the same as trying to get people to stop smoking tobacco products. They dont want to change; they are happy with slowly dying inside. -- munky99999


EdmundGerber

join:2010-01-04
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

Lately Apple has become the prime target of choice. Folks running Windows OS's are used to MS's ways, and have good skills at securing their PC's.

Apple's market share is increasing - that, combined with a less informed user-base makes that platform very attractive to hackers.

Bottom line - if we all had half a clue, no one would get hacked.



Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

To expand on what wapu See Profile brought up, there are two key elements that affect what a user chooses in his OS: functionality and security. Functionality, for most users who are not necessarily 'gurus', implies an OS supporting a wide range of apps that are well-designed, near-universally available, and are fully compatible with the apps used by others. It also implies an ease of use (for both OS and apps) that is within the grasp of a broad range of competencies. Security, for most users who aren't 'gurus', means that in the ordinary operation of their computer software, the system 'doesn't get infected' and that their personal data remains safe.

Since, in human behavior, convenience always conflicts with security considerations, the perceived ease and broadness of functionality will always be at odds with the security aspects of an OS and related apps. That sets up a tradeoff that only the particular user can decide, based on his personal habits, competency, and perception of digital security. Unfortunately for many people, convenience and ease will always tend to trump security considerations, so the tradeoff will generally be decided in favor of the former at the expense of the latter. All this takes place in the digital marketplace that exists "today", as opposed to how things "ought to be" in some ideal or theoretical world.

Given that Windows and its apps widely dominate new-computer installations and the marketplace in general (regardless of how that came about), that makes them a kind of 'universal' that heavily affects user perceptions of compatibility, ease-of-use, and range of available apps. However, Windows' wide usage simultaneously leads to its being targeted by a much wider range of security exploits, so if only for that reason, it "seems" more security-flawed. Debates have raged for years over whether Unix (or some other OS) is inherently more secure and, if that were true, whether similar security can be achieved by security settings and software overlaid upon Windows - and, if so, which ones and how... etc... ad nauseum. Whether the apparent security advantages of other OS's are meaningful in the real world of how average users actually set and use their computers can only be truly answered when black-hat exploit creativity turns full-bore upon them like it has for Windows. And that will only happen when such OS's become much more widely accepted and employed. In any case, that time is not "today".

Only the user himself can decide whether the apparent security differences in other OS's balance the possible impacts on software availability and compatibility within the digital universe that exists today, whether the functionality and ease-of-use of an alternate OS improves on that which he has experienced (perhaps) with Windows, and whether the risk/reward ratio of converting a system (or office) to a new OS/apps concept is worth it. As always, the best advice might be to simply try out something new. Or at least, try some of the available Linux distro disks on an existing Windows system to get a feel for them... or try to get some seat-time with a friend who has an Apple. In some of those cases, you may find that you've "regained control" of a system, only to wish you never had to deal with that level of control. Or you may find that you simply can't make things work the way you're really used to without changing habits far too deeply ingrained to try. Or you may even really like the way things flow in the new scheme. In the end, it's up to you.
--
"Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God!" -- P.Henry, 1775



Mike
Premium,Mod
join:2000-09-17
Pittsburgh, PA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to EdmundGerber

said by EdmundGerber:

Lately Apple has become the prime target of choice. Folks running Windows OS's are used to MS's ways, and have good skills at securing their PC's.

Apple's market share is increasing - that, combined with a less informed user-base makes that platform very attractive to hackers.

Bottom line - if we all had half a clue, no one would get hacked.

Zero day.
--
"If something about the human body disgusts you, complain to the manufacturer" - Lenny Bruce
What this country needs is a good five dollar plasma weapon.


Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3
reply to GlassyMcPete

I've been accused of being somewhat knowable in security issues, and I happily run Windows. Currently I'm running Windows 7 which I keep up with on patches, Microsoft Security Essentials, I have a Netgear router and I practice sex hex, never had a security problem here. I use my computer for work and pleasure.

Blake
--
Vendor: Author of Link Logger which is a traffic analysis and firewall logging tool


slajoh01

join:2005-04-23

1 recommendation

* Patch and Patch and Patch. Not only Windows but software applications as well.
* Common sense. User behavour with web content filters
* AV
* SPI/NAT Firewall with Windows firewall enabled

I also keep an OS image in case I get bit and have enough time to restore and get going again.



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2

1 edit

1 recommendation

While I agree with all that one can, through no fault of their own, get hit with a 0-day exploit. However that is true regardless of the OS. That's why you should

I also keep an OS image in case I get bit and have enough time to restore and get going again.

I backup two boxes weekly (imaged + changed files). One box has 2 weeks worth of images. The other has three. At most I'd lose 6-7 days of changes.

Another box has almost 3 months worth of daily/weekly backups.

I've learned over the decades. Backups have saved me many many times.
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


AVD
Respice, Adspice, Prospice
Premium
join:2003-02-06
Onion, NJ
kudos:1

1 recommendation

reply to mazhurg

said by mazhurg:

No OS is immune to social hacking.

THESE DAYS THE BIGGEST THREAT IS PHISHING OR OTHER SOCIAL ENGINEERING

(edit: or a stuck caps-lock key )
--
[i]IF YOU THINK THE STORM IS OVER-HYPED AND EXAGGERATED, PLEASE ERR
ON THE SIDE OF CAUTION.[/i]
--Standard disclaimers apply.--

wat0114
Premium
join:2012-02-20
Calgary, AB

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

Lately I'm using Linux (Ubuntu/Xubuntu) far more than Windows, because it fills my simple needs admirably with a lower impact on resources, and I agree with what some others have said that it's easier to secure than Windows, with less on-going maintenance. The repository updating functionality makes things an absolute breeze.



chrisretusn
Retired
Premium
join:2007-08-13
Philippines
kudos:1
Reviews:
·PLDT
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

I still use Windows, but not very often. I have one "direct" install of Windows XP on a laptop that by default boots to Linux. I can't remember the last time I booted to Windows on that laptop to do anything productive unless you count updates.

I have four other PC's (two desk, two lap) in the house, all boot only to Linux. One desktop has Windows XP and Windows 7 installed as virtual machines. I start them up once a month primarily to update them. Last time I used Windows XP for something useful was last January.
--
Chris
Living in Paradise!!


Velnias

join:2004-07-06

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

Not for security. Use common sense.

HINT: for one OS, there are plenty of security forums, with a hordes of experts, advising, how to prevent infections and clean them afterward...



Link Logger
Premium,MVM
join:2001-03-29
Calgary, AB
kudos:3

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

I should also add that I do daily backups as well, but I think of that as more hardware failure protection.

Blake



StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
Premium
join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
kudos:2
reply to AVD

And I thought is was another Dude111 See Profile post
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!


PrntRhd
Premium
join:2004-11-03
Fairfield, CA
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit

2 recommendations

reply to GlassyMcPete

Windows is not the main problem right now.
Oracle Java and Adobe Flash and Adobe Reader are much greater issues.
»No MS products on Kaspersky's top 10 vulnerabilities list


ctggzg
Premium
join:2005-02-11
USA
kudos:2

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

Computer literacy and (un?)common sense are more effective than running as a limited user, antivirus, and software firewall combined. The vast majority of infections don't happen automatically without your knowledge; most of the time, an ignorant user intentionally takes some action that gets them into trouble. People are always warned not to open suspicious emails or links, but simply OPENING those things is rarely a problem.



antdude
A Ninja Ant
Premium,VIP
join:2001-03-25
United State
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

I personally use varieties: Windows (32-bit XP Pro. SP3 to 64-bit 7), Mac OS X (10.5.8 - 10.8.2), and Linux (Debian). They all have their strong and weak points including in security. Pick what is best for your needs and go from there.



ashrc4
Premium
join:2009-02-06
australia

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to GlassyMcPete

said by GlassyMcPete:

I really don't feel like I am in control of what goes on on my computer which worries me since I have tax data, customer info, etc.

Guessing your a Tax Accountant and therefore would advise that you have someone set-up your computers properly.
Not sure of all the legal requirements but transferring tax details from home to work etc require certain rules/procedures to be followed as a start.

It may come done to who is available to advise/set-up your system and their preference. Mac/Windows. And even the type of software you can run comfortably for your needs.
--
Paradigm Shift beta test pilot. "Dying to defend one's small piece of suburb...Give me something global...STAT!

RayGeode

join:2004-07-21
Norwalk, CT
Reviews:
·Optimum Online

1 edit
reply to GlassyMcPete

I have been with microsoft since 1990 and I had 1 virus which probably came from an unsafe sharing user. 100% use common sense, don't click on any email's you don't recognize the sender, and never click an .exe you were sent. I use AVAST free for home use, and pay for my office use whether AVAST or other.

It's a small price to pay for using the cheapest and most widely used ( therefore compatible ) OS in existence. Lots of free or cheap programs etc, and WIN7 is stablest and best by far. Why fool with anything else?

said by GlassyMcPete:

.....something that can be hacked in a day or two....

???? Do you think that someone is waiting for you to fire up your new windows laptop, then gets to work hacking , and in a day you are toast? Forgive me, but this naive point of view only points more to the fact that you really need something simple to use. Not a mix mash of operating systems unless you want to devote much of your next 6 months learning the finer points of computer operation.

The truth is that the virus code to make your computer toast has been written and deployed already, but just like mud puddles, you just sidestep them and they never get you.
Expand your moderator at work


EUS
Kill cancer
Premium
join:2002-09-10
canada
Reviews:
·voip.ms

2 edits

2 recommendations

Re: Do you still use Windows?

Even if not gaming, I'd need a copy of windows just for my tax software. WINE virtualization has not worked, and no freakin' way I'm doing my taxes online with a string of unlisted "strategic partners" that would have access to my tax info, that would be stored in the cloud, who do not guarantee in any way that my info is safe from theft/abuse.
So that's "what's wrong" with some of us.
--
~ Project Hope ~