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whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to whfsdude

Re: Getting 305/65

Update:

Brian from Comcast called. Friday at 10 AM Comcast will install a fiber drop from the pole to my house (I'll take pictures). A splice box will be placed on the pole in case any of my neighbors want fiber service.

The Ciena unit will be placed the day of the service turn up.

I floated the number of 60 days to Brian, he did not seem to think it would take that long. I'm guessing another week or two.

The engineering with the ILEC (VZ) has been good.



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to whfsdude

Another update:

Came home tonight to find Comcast had run microduct through the manholes from the node to my pole.

Fiber has been run through the microduct and is looped waiting to be affixed to the pole.



Gave Brian a call at Comcast to let him know - he was aware. Comcast is awaiting the arrival of another piece of equipment that's not the 3931, but is made from Ciena. It was referred to as housing so I suspect it's a fancy splice enclosure.



JigglyWiggly

join:2009-07-12
Pleasanton, CA

Another week or two? That's pretty long



Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:3

I'm sure once Comcast gets their act together it'll become second nature to them.



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

said by Mike Wolf:

I'm sure once Comcast gets their act together it'll become second nature to them.

For the amount of work Comcast had to do on this install, it seems like they have their act together.

This isn't just adding a cable drop....


Mike Wolf

join:2009-05-24
Beachwood, NJ
kudos:3

yup



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to whfsdude

Update:

Brian and his crew showed up to do the fiber drop and prep for the placement of the 3931.

They placed a "fiber can" on the upper right side of the pole.



Ran a fiber drop from the pole to the house. It's actually two wires - one being a copper wire that holds the weight.

The fiber is attached on the left mount.



Fiber tape used to denote the wire is fiber.



Fiber spool ready for 3931 placement.



Had to drill through brick but did a really nice job of it. No cracking at all.



cat5e but this will be pulled out and new cat5e and power run from the inside to the 3931 outside.



Install is scheduled for the 30th. Fiber still needs to be spliced by a crew which will happen prior to the 30th.

The fiber is dedicated pairs all the way to the headend (Michigan Ave). No DWDM in-between. It's also 32 pairs.

Engineering should have the circuit ready to be turned up when the 3931 is placed. So my next update will probably include a speedtest.

By far the best install process by any company so far. Great guys to work with!



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to whfsdude

Looks great! Hope you gave those guys a turkey sandwich ( or something) as a tip.



IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
reply to whfsdude

Wish I could get a fiber drop on Extreme 105.



tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

Why?
there is no speed difference between fiber and coax in the short distance between the node and your home (even outside the imposed 1/2 mile limit of 305) the only difference is your ethernet is converted to a D3 compatible electrical signal in your modem which is converted to/from light at the node onto fiber
his signal will basically convert just outside the wall and pass thru the node as light and onto the same/adjoining fiber to the next router.
The minute delay of that extra conversion on your path SHOULD be unnoticable in human time, if everything is working as designed, if not call in and complain.


rw123
Premium
join:2004-01-16
Indianapolis, IN
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to whfsdude

Yea, my 105 gets typically 20-30ms pings but usually in downloading a big file, or video, it is bandwidth not ping time to me if pings are under 50ms or so it does not seem to matter much. (purely unscientific math of course!)

Now for gaming, I would think the potential for a much lower ping time would help, but my 20ms is pretty darn good even for that.

As long as the line is not oversubscribed, download should not be an issue, and if you can bond 8 channels you really should be good there to IMO.

whfsdude, great to see the project moving forward!
--
Running Arris TM722G



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

2 edits
reply to tshirt

said by tshirt:

Why?
there is no speed difference between fiber and coax in the short distance between the node and your home

A couple of thoughts on this.

1. Should be impacted less by power outages. (Headend should never lose power).

2. No oversubscription. I sometimes see packet loss during peak periods. Dense area, pretty tough to split nodes.

3. Google should be about ~1-2 ms vs. 30 - 40. It does make a noticeable difference. Especially in terms of VoIP as your latency should be constant (no jitter).

4. No SLA in my contract but I'm on Metro E service in which cell companies use pairs next to mine.

5. Future-proofed. Will probably see upgrades in the next year as Verizon and Comcast duke it out.

6. Better CPE. Cable modem CPEs are pretty horrible (sorry CableLabs) when compared MetroE CPEs. Eg. Lets say Comcast wanted to do a jumbo frames beta someday. Probably not a good idea in v4 land to push jumbo frames over the internet, but it could be doable with v6 and PMTUD.


tshirt
Premium,MVM
join:2004-07-11
Snohomish, WA
kudos:4
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 recommendation

I agree there are some advantages, but I see a fair number of posts here where people seem to believe fiber is magic, and it will somehow transform their computer experience to a nirvana like state.
glass is glass, and the exact last mile solution PROPERLY implemented is irrelevant 99+% of the time.
glass more easily is subject to damage and more difficult to repair.

Your install situation is near optimal with only the last few feet exposed (easy replacement, if needed) a short, drop to backhaul CONDUIT path and undergrounded common backhaul (high repair priority if a backhoe goes crazy) to a backbone switching center.
Yes we will see the transition to fiber somewhat sooner then expected (particularly on higher speeds) but I can't see them dumping newer, very servicable coax for fiber unless a fair number of subs PAY for it's expanded footprint(as you are)

I wonder if they see YOUR install fees/ EFT the same way as other (coax) extensions, and if your neighbors upgrade within the first year or 2 their fee would repay some of yours?
Sort of a google-fiber like sales plan ("get 65% of your neighbor on the 3 year 305 plan and the install is free") or if they will get the full $500 from each one, for that now very short pole to home run.



djrobx
Premium
join:2000-05-31
Valencia, CA
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Time Warner Cable
·VOIPO
reply to whfsdude

Google should be about ~1-2 ms vs. 30 - 40. It does make a noticeable difference.

DOCSIS latency is usually less than 10ms. If your route to Google is going from 40 to 1ms, there's more going on than just your last mile fiber.
--
AT&T U-Hearse - RIP Unlimited Internet 1995-2011
Rethink Billable.


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit

said by djrobx:

Google should be about ~1-2 ms vs. 30 - 40. It does make a noticeable difference.

DOCSIS latency is usually less than 10ms. If your route to Google is going from 40 to 1ms, there's more going on than just your last mile fiber.

I get about 8-13 ms during off-peak hours. Peak hours it jumps, along with the addition of packet loss. Obviously this is dependent on the congestion of your local node. Should be a moot point come Friday


28619103
Premium
join:2009-03-01
21435
reply to djrobx

said by djrobx:

Google should be about ~1-2 ms vs. 30 - 40. It does make a noticeable difference.

DOCSIS latency is usually less than 10ms. If your route to Google is going from 40 to 1ms, there's more going on than just your last mile fiber.

Latency is "mostly" impacted by speed of light and which Google server Google chooses to direct you to via their authoritative DNS servers answering www.google.com, www.youtube.com, etc.

If Google wants to serve youtube videos to DC from Seattle, your latency will be high. If they choose to use a closer server in VA your latency will be lower. They may balance their server load at the expense of network latency.


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by 28619103:

If they choose to use a closer server in VA your latency will be lower. They may balance their server load at the expense of network latency.

Yup! Was just using Google's IAD cache as an example.

Better example - default gateway


EG
The wings of love
Premium
join:2006-11-18
Union, NJ
kudos:9
reply to djrobx

said by djrobx:

DOCSIS latency is usually less than 10ms.

That can depend on which flavor of TDMA is being used for the return.


bradyr
Columbia College IT
Premium
join:2008-10-27
Sonora, CA

Does your distance from the node (coax cable length) negatively affect the latency, or is it a minuscule difference? (like being on the first tap off of the node, as opposed to being nearly a mile [cable length] from the node)?


cooldude9919

join:2000-05-29
kudos:5

said by bradyr:

Does your distance from the node (coax cable length) negatively affect the latency, or is it a minuscule difference? (like being on the first tap off of the node, as opposed to being nearly a mile [cable length] from the node)?

Maybe that the mircosecond level, but minuscule as you said. But hell i read posts that some day trader types will pay extra to have their racks closer to the meet me rooms and such to have a shorter ethernet connection.

mario02423

join:2004-06-09
Berwyn, IL
Reviews:
·Comcast

Maybe that the mircosecond level, but minuscule as you said. But hell i read posts that some day trader types will pay extra to have their racks closer to the meet me rooms and such to have a shorter ethernet connection.
I work for a futures and options exchange and believe me, we count in the nanoseconds. There are, in fact, traders and firms that will spend crazy amounts of money to be co-located with other traders and firms. In those co-lo facilities, we run cable to the centimeter to ensure all firms have equal cable runs from their equipment to ours and ensure they experience the exact same latency as others to our trading platforms. It's insane.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH

Wouldn't it just all wash out at the switch level anyway? That's nuts. Is there some central authority running the whole thing, or is it just connecting with other firms? If there's a central authority, then wouldn't it be best to artificially adjust everyone's ping to like 2000ms so that everyone has a fair shot, even if their internet connection has a 1400ms ping?


mario02423

join:2004-06-09
Berwyn, IL

High Frequency Trading (HFT) is a multi-billion dollar industry. Our markets move at what we call "near real time" and need to do just that.


AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
reply to BiggA

said by BiggA:

Wouldn't it just all wash out at the switch level anyway? That's nuts. Is there some central authority running the whole thing, or is it just connecting with other firms? If there's a central authority, then wouldn't it be best to artificially adjust everyone's ping to like 2000ms so that everyone has a fair shot, even if their internet connection has a 1400ms ping?

They don't want it to be fair, they want it to be better for themselves.


28619103
Premium
join:2009-03-01
21435
reply to mario02423

said by mario02423:

High Frequency Trading (HFT) is a multi-billion dollar industry. Our markets move at what we call "near real time" and need to do just that.

Here's an interesting read to show how true that statement really is

»www.forbes.com/forbes/2010/0927/···war.html

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to AVonGauss

So there's no central authority to even it out then?


mario02423

join:2004-06-09
Berwyn, IL

said by BiggA:

central authority

In terms of speeds? No. It's every man for himself.

xech

join:2012-11-22

Is this 305mbps available for Miami Customers?



whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by xech:

Is this 305mbps available for Miami Customers?

I think it's only available to customers located in their NE division. As this is their answer to FiOS.

I would recommend posting in the Comcast Direct forum and having ComcastSteve have someone give you a callback.


whfsdude
Premium
join:2003-04-05
Washington, DC
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to whfsdude

Update:

Saw the splice tech leaving when I got home. Two snowshoes placed on the line in the alley. Looks to be spliced. ...well it's in the fibercan (splice box).

Tomorrow between 10:00 AM and 12:00 PM the install/turn-up will occur. Very excited.

Jason or Chris, happen to know if v6 PD will be a /56, 60, or /64. Ideally I'd like to redo my DHCP6 client config tonight.

I could also happily deal with a static routed v6 block if PD is an issue.