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inGearX
3.1415 9265

join:2000-06-11
New York

why does most of the broadband internet has slow upload?

Click for full size
I'm visiting many countries ... places... friends...

well 95% of connections I encounter have upload speed that is a tiny fraction speed of the download speed :/

throughout the world...

is it because ALL connections are based on cable technology? which was designed to send to user and not to receive much? (
and we need to wait dozens of more decades for new technologies to become more integrated into our physical infrastructure - like FiOS ... )

well I do not think I use just cable based connections... :/

is there some financial issue with Global backbone providers VS ISP about speed they purchase - upload is more expensive?

or what the hell is going on???


MagMan
Life is simpler when you tell the truth.
Premium
join:2003-10-01
Westlake, OH
Reviews:
·AT&T Midwest
·AT&T Midwest
Google is your friend....

»www.quora.com/Broadband/Why-do-h···ad-speed

It's mostly design intent. Until recently, Internet usage was extremely asymmetric, meaning that people downloaded far more than they uploaded. With this in mind, the technology designers created equipment that favored download speeds.

The reason for the trade-off is because there is only so much frequency available in the transmission medium, whether it's coax
for cable or a phone line for DSL. Higher frequencies suffer noise and signal loss sooner than lower frequencies, so there's an effective limit to how much spectral bandwidth is available. Since the available spectral bandwidth is limited, how it's used becomes an issue.

Since the design intent is for higher download speeds, more of the available frequency is assigned for download and less is assigned for uploads.

A further complication is from the way both DSL and Cable fan out. The connections all terminate next to each other at the provider end in closely packed equipment and in the cable runs to the equipment. At the subscriber end, the terminations are far apart (ie at different buildings). This causes more crosstalk at the provider's end of the connection. The signal originating from the provider is less susceptible to crosstalk than the weaker signal arriving at the provider from the subscriber. This phenomenon further impairs the subscriber's upload bandwidth.
--
"The truth is incontrovertible, malice may attack it, ignorance may deride it, but in the end; there it is."


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
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reply to inGearX
The reason is both technical and business. DSL was originally created to do video on demand prior to the explosion of the Internet. That needs lots of speed toward the customer but not much back up. When it was dusted off by the Telcos to provide Internet access the same split was implemented on the assumption residential service was primarily consumptive so needed faster download then up.

Cable has a different set of trade-offs. The Cable network was designed to deliver TV over 6Mhz RF channels. Repurpusing one or more channels allows the MSO to provide high speed download. Upload is a problem. In fact some Cable systems used dialup for upload in the early days. The frequencies below Channel 2 (54Mhz) were used to transmit data back to the head-end. This was typically limited to equipment monitoring and pay-per-view info. Repurposing this for Internet was difficult and offers much less bandwidth then download.

The business reason is to offer clear marketing delineation between cheap residential service and expensive business class service.

/tom


Hayward
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Premium
join:2000-07-13
Key West, FL
kudos:1
said by tschmidt:

The reason is both technical and business. DSL was originally created to do video on demand prior to the explosion of the Internet.

Not really the internet was around for near a DECADE before there was DSL in any significant amount.
--



tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·Hollis Hosting
·G4 Communications
said by Hayward:

Not really the internet was around for near a DECADE before there was DSL in any significant amount.

I stand by what I posted.

Back when DSL was originally developed, in the late 80's, The Telcos saw ISDN as their digital future, not the Internet. They were slow to the Internet party. DSL was seen as a way to cheaply increase end user ISDN speed over a copper loop so it could support video.

»www.google.com/patents/US4924492

Telcos dusted off DSL for Internet access in response to competitive pressure from the Cable companies rolling out residential Internet access.

/tom


Hayward
K A R - 1 2 0 C
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join:2000-07-13
Key West, FL
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But DSL was not widely deployed until around 2000, in fact this site only came about in 1998 as I recall... with a very small user base until again about 2000.
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tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·Hollis Hosting
·G4 Communications
said by Hayward:

But DSL was not widely deployed until around 2000, in fact this site only came about in 1998 as I recall... with a very small user base until again about 2000.

Exactly my point.

ISDN never became mainstream. The Telcos grudging re-purposed DSL to complete with Cable and gave up on ISDN.

/tom


Hayward
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Key West, FL
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OK but actually other than maybe major metro areas Cable HSI was many years behind DSL.
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Wily_One
Premium
join:2002-11-24
San Jose, CA
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse

1 recommendation

reply to tschmidt
Ironically, I actually had ISDN to my house circa 2000-2001, and used it to get to the Internet. (128 Kbps rocked for Half-Life Deathmatch! Especially when everyone else was on dial-up... )

Getting back on topic, while expensive, ISDN was symmetric at least.


Moropo
Premium
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reply to inGearX
Click for full size


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 recommendation

reply to tschmidt
said by tschmidt:

said by Hayward:

But DSL was not widely deployed until around 2000, in fact this site only came about in 1998 as I recall... with a very small user base until again about 2000.

Exactly my point.

ISDN never became mainstream. The Telcos grudging re-purposed DSL to complete with Cable and gave up on ISDN.

/tom

ISDN never became mainstream for CONSUMERS. It was extremely popular and mainstream for business.
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IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!


Hayward
K A R - 1 2 0 C
Premium
join:2000-07-13
Key West, FL
kudos:1
And there was also SDSL (same speed up/dn) but doesn't seem to be offered to consumers anymore, though may still be an option for business accounts where there is the seen need for large upload bandwidth for video conferencing, biz file exchange, etc.
--


prairiesky

join:2008-12-08
canada
kudos:2
reply to inGearX
I would also think that part of it would stem from increasing revenues. Remember that companies are purchasing symmetrical connections. So, as an ISP, If i'm selling the download bandwidth to customers for their use, I have all of this upload not being utilized, I can then turn that into upload for a number of servers at a minimal cost. basically, maximizing revenues and bandwidth usage.

It also helps to differentiate home connections from business connections.


Locutus65
Why bother?
Premium
join:2001-05-24
Houston, TX
kudos:2
reply to Moropo
DAYUM! How much does that cost you Moropo?


drslash
Goya Asma
Premium
join:2002-02-18
Marion, IA
Probably nothing. The students and the state of Florida probably foot the bill. If he is a student then he is paying something for it in tuition, fees, or room and board.