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John0067

join:2012-11-01
Westminster, SC

Gen4 on home network

I gotta believe that there are others out there with my problem. I have a small home network with 3 computers (two wired ethernet and one wireless), four networked printers (3 wired and one wireless), and a wired Network Attached Storage device. With my old 7000 modem, I connected it to a network port on my wireless router (not WAN). The modem insisted upon being 192.168.0.1, so I configured the router as 192.168.0.254 and each of the computers and other devices on the network with a fixed address in the range 192.168.0.xxx. DHCP in the router was turned off, as the 7000 insists upon being the DHCP server. Mask 255.255.255.255 and default gateway 192.168.0.1 on all devices. D.N.S. 8.8.8.8 (or any of several other generic DNS servers). This worked!

Now comes the new HT1000 modem on GEN4, and the modem still is 192.168.0.1, but the only way to get computers on the internet is to let the HT1000 auto-assign addresses, which are like 100.73.32.19/255.255.255.248, DNS 192.168.0.1 Gateway 100.73.32.17. I might be able to make the printers accessible by manually assigning them fixed addresses in the same range as the computers, but this range seems to change every time the modem is re-started, so they would not be stable. I tried unsuccessfully to connect the HT1000 to the router’s WAN port. with the router at 192.168.0.254 and all the network devices set in the range 192.168.0.xxx MASK 255.255.255.255 GATEWAY 192.168.0.1 (also tried 192.168.0.254) DNS 8.8.8.8. The router successfully picked up an address, etc., from the modem, but would not provide internet access on the network. Same result when the router and all devices were set at 192.168.1.xxx.

Am I missing something here, or has Hughes now successfully prevented using their new gear on a functioning home network? Any input would be much appreciated. Sorry for the long post!

zeddlar

join:2007-04-09
Jay, OK
Reviews:
·exede by ViaSat
·McDonald County ..
This is going to sound redundant but if you have a network set-up disk that came with your router then try rerunning it. I have a cisco router right now and no matter how you set it up it will not allow internet access without running that disk, even though all the settings after running it are the same as the ones I set manually. Just a thought you might consider.
--
HughesNet elite plan/.74 dish w/1watt trans. / 9000 modem / 3 computers on a linksy's wired network

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to John0067
Not sure I completely follow your post, but essentially what you need to do is connect your HN modem to the WAN port and let the HN modem assign an IP to your router WAN. If that is in the 192.168.0.xxx range then so be it.

Then you set your Router to 192.168.1.1, and all your home devices on the 1.xxx subnet, whether fixed IP, or DHCP (the Router would have to be told what IP address range of .1.xxx to .1.yyy to assign). For all your LAN devices that are not DHCP, you tell them that your Internet gateway is 192.168.1.1 and you're done--the router knows to route to the WAN side regardless of what the HN modem has assigned to its WAN port, or what IP address in the WWW the HN modem is talking at the moment.

That it worked before for you is fine, but the above I think is the more reasonable way to set-up, and should be easy for you with less than 10 LAN devices (I have 50 or 60).

John0067

join:2012-11-01
Westminster, SC
Thank you laserfan!

I had tried your setup (which I recognize as the standard way to setup a router) earlier, but apparently I had some little thing wrong, and it did not work. I assumed that it was due to something strange with the Hughes modem.

Today, I redid the entire setup exactly like you outlined, and all is well! I can connect to the internet, and use all my local devices.

Thanks again! And thank you dslreports for sponsoring this forum.

laserfan

join:2005-01-14
Texas
reply to John0067
Glad I could help.


dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5
reply to John0067
Just curious about the IP block you showed (100.73.32.19/255.255.255.248).

Are they actually using a .248 mask on the LAN side instead of a .0?


C0RR0SIVE88

@direcway.com
Yep, they are.

IPv4 address 100.73.51.178
Subnet mask IPv4 255.255.255.248


dbirdman
Premium,MVM
join:2003-07-07
usa
kudos:5
Interesting. Can other Gen4 users reading here tell us whether they have a .248 mask?

That mask can only provide DHCP for 5 devices, although obviously putting it though a router opens up any number of possibilities.

Additionally, using 100.73, which is part of a special purpose reserved block almost implies that they expect to allow port forwarding at some point. Hard to see why they otherwise wouldn't have used 192.168 again, or 10. something.
--
Motosat self-pointing dishes: .74 meter G74 on 127W, SL-5 HD DirecTV|Hughes HN7000S|Verizon UMW190 Air Card|1990 Blue Bird Wanderlodge Bus "Blue Thunder"|Author of hnFAP-Alert, PC-OPI and DSSatTool

TexasRebel

join:2011-05-29
Edgewood, TX
yep.. 255.255.255.248

I wonder what the Business Class customers will have when they roll out those packages?


blaubon12

@direcway.com
reply to dbirdman
Yep..255.255.255.248

Freddie6

join:2012-12-07
Athens, GA
reply to John0067
Thanks everyone for dialogue. I have same issues....frustrating!

HElp me understand more, please.

I contacted HughesNet. The response was to
Gateway 192.168.0.1
Mask 255.255.255.0
DNS 66.82.4.8 & 66.82.4.12

The only difference between this configuration and what was before HN had me set router IP to 192.168.0.2 and turn DHCP off on router.

SO,...something needs to change. My wireless printers are not recognized AND I am limited to only a few wireless connections at a time.

In my router I should set configuration to
Gateway 192.168.0.1
Mask 255.255.255.0
DNS 66.82.4.8 & 66.82.4.12

Do I assign router to 192.168.0.2?
Do I turn router DHCP off?

All help is greatly appreciated!