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nunya
Premium,MVM
join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
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reply to JoeSchmoe007

Re: Water and natural gas availability during power outage.

NG delivery does not rely on the electrical grid. It works by pressure hat is regulated down as it is distributed.

Water is pumped by electric pumps. It can either be pumped out directly, pumped into large towers, or pumped up to a rooftop tank.
If your building is tall enough, water might be pumped to the top so it can be reserved and provide pressure.
In some situations, there may simply be a booster pump for the upper floors.
I've heard that you can lose 4-5 PSI per "story" of a building.

The water company will have generators on their pumps. If those fail, then no water.

In the event of a major natural disaster, NG supply can be interrupted. Even if the disaster didn't destroy the gas infrastructure, the buildings it serves may be leaking (think tornado or large fire). If you are in the vicinity, you could lose service too.
In earthquakes, gas pipelines can be ruptured, including large pipelines that serve entire cities.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.



Smokey
I'd rather be skiing
Premium
join:2003-05-20
Wild West

NG does require power, but not at the user side of the system. Most pumping stations can run off the gas in the pipeline for power, or shore power or both. The three stations around here use gas during the day, and shore at night to take advantage of the cheaper power rates.

In NY, it is very possibly that he has a cistern on the roof for his water supply. While it may have a pump to get the water to the roof, once it is there you are gold. To check, he should just pull up google earth.
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Para Bellum!!



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2
reply to nunya

said by nunya:

In the event of a major natural disaster, NG supply can be interrupted. Even if the disaster didn't destroy the gas infrastructure, the buildings it serves may be leaking (think tornado or large fire). If you are in the vicinity, you could lose service too.
In earthquakes, gas pipelines can be ruptured, including large pipelines that serve entire cities.

Just got an email on my ham radio club's mailing list. Basically the guy said his son at the Jersey Shore was told it would take 6 to 8 MONTHS before his electric and gas was restored.

One of my wife's coworkers also had her gas shut off because two large trees toppled over and pulled up the gas main in the proces. Nobody wants to touch the trees, not national grid, not her insurance (the trees landed on her house) not state and local Gov't. So they are out of gas and electric while the insurance, gas company and the Government bicker over who should remove the trees.

I will never ever rely on the grid as my sole source of backup. Even if you have an automatic standby genset on natural gas, it is probably wise to keep a small gasoline powered generator as a backup. Natural gas can be and has been interrupted for many people. The Government can also shut it off and ration it for whatever reason.

Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
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I remember a natural gas shortage in the northeastern US in 1977. Businesses were required to turn down their heat to 60 F if they wanted to stay open past 8 PM. I recall wearing a coat while eating in a restaurant in Jersey City. My burger was cold before I finished it.