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Davesnothere
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join:2009-06-15
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reply to Trev

Re: Do All Calls to DID Go Through Original CLEC After Ported?

said by Trev:

said by jimk:

No, it doesn't go through the original CLEC equipment.

When a number is ported, it is assigned a LRN.

The LRN looks like a telephone number but works differently.

It allows a call to be routed directly to a different provider's switch.

This has been my understanding as well, but on that token I do not work on this kind of equipment....

 
This has also been MY understanding of it.

Pay particular attention to the last paragraph on that linked page.

The LRN is the key to avoiding the original switch of the ILEC/CLEC.

For everyone's convenience....
quote:
Call Flow to a Ported Telephone Number :

When a call is made to the ported telephone number, the initiating service provider switch launches a query to its LNP call routing database to determine whether the telephone number has been ported. If it has, the database response provides the switch with the LRN needed to properly route the call. If the number is not ported, the database response indicates that the call should be routed based on the telephone number. When multiple switches are involved in the call path, the next to last carrier has the responsibility to make the LNP database query if one has not already been made.


azmike

join:2012-07-19
Phoenix, AZ

1 recommendation

So in reality this sentence:
When a call is made to the ported telephone number, the initiating service provider switch launches a query to its LNP call routing database to determine whether the telephone number has been ported.
Should say:
When a call is made to the ported telephone number, the initiating service provider switch launches a query to an LNP call routing database to determine whether the telephone number has been ported.
The reason I say that is depending upon the decisions made by the "initiating service provider" they may or may not have their own LNP database. In the case of small (underfunded) service providers - most VoIP providers - they likely do not. Instead they choose to use the LNP Database Query Service of one or more larger providers. In this case they simply pay fractions of a penny for each query, or have some other business relationship in place.

In my case I researched this process roughly a year ago because callers to my ported number were randomly receiving a recording that the "Mobile number they were trying to reach had traveled beyond the service range" or some such thing. The ported number was never a mobile number, not originally or after the port.

Turns out the company that received my ported number was using the LNP database of the original provider. In addition there was evidently some LCR (Least Cost Routing) magic that added more confusion (namely the mobile number thing). This led me to believe that the original was always involved in the process of the call with the simple purpose of obtaining an LRN. In fact this is not always true but apparently is fairly common.

azmike

join:2012-07-19
Phoenix, AZ

1 edit

1 recommendation

Oh and forgot to say...

From what I was told typically there is no initial lookup in an LNP database when a call is originated. Calls are simply processed as "normal" - that is, assuming the number has not been ported. This is the part that I don't recall 100% but I thought the original service provider would typically return an LRN if the number had been ported. If it didn't return an LRN then there was at least some other indication that it was not the "end point" for the call. Then at that point the originating switch would do the LNP lookup "song and dance".

Anyway that's why I thought the original xLEC was typically involved in at least the initial signalling part of a call.

josephf

join:2009-04-26
If your described scenario is correct, then it would appear that it takes longer to complete a call to a ported number than to complete a call to a non-ported number, due to the extra steps you described involved when the number is a ported one.


leibold
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said by josephf:

If your described scenario is correct, then it would appear that it takes longer to complete a call to a ported number than to complete a call to a non-ported number, due to the extra steps you described involved when the number is a ported one.

Not really. The LNP database lookup needs to be done either way (only a failure to find the dialed number in the database tells the provider that the number has not been ported).
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