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mdshs

@teksavvy.com

How does one add Wifi to an existing wired network?

Sorry might be a dumb question but figure someone would know. Right now I have a Netgear router which has Wifi built in which is fine. We are changing to the Cisco UC500 series phone system which has the router built in and runs the whole office, replacing the Netgear. I'm comparing the 520 and 540 as I can get the 520 far cheaper with the main difference being that it doesn't have Wifi built in. I like having the UC be the router and what not so that QoS is easier letting it reserve bandwidth for SIP calls etc. I'm just wondering though how I'd add Wifi to this?

I'm not a networking expert, but I know that I could of course connect the existing Netgear to the UC500 system which would get an IP by DHCP and be a wifi network. Assuming that my UC520 has an IP of 10.0.0.1 and all my wired devices are 10.0.0.2, 10.0.0.3 etc up to 10.0.0.50, would I just disable DHCP under LAN on the Netgear, give the Netgear an IP address of something like 10.0.0.100 or whatever I want, and that's it? What about the Internet tab, do I need to put anything in there?

If the above is correct, would that impact QoS etc at all with the wired router? Like I like how you can have PCs, printers etc plugged into one of the 8 ethernet ports on the UC520 and have it manage QoS and prioritize IP calls, but would it still do the same if I had wireless plugged in? Or is there a better way to do this, such as buying a device that isn't a router but that is just a wireless device? Not sure the terminology of what I'd need, like if the Netgear can be used or if there's a better device that's less complicated to purchase that does Wifi. Thanks!!!


gweidenh

join:2002-05-18
Houston, TX
kudos:3

1 recommendation

I think you got it.

Just give the Netgear a static IP address. Make sure to turn off DHCP server on the Netgear, and you should be good to go.

Make sure not to use the "WAN" or "Internet" port anymore on the Netgear. Just plug it into one of the 4 primary switch ports.


rblizz

join:2001-12-16
North Richland Hills, TX
Reviews:
·Callcentric
reply to mdshs

I think you basically have it.

I don't know which Netgear router you're using, but here's a link detailing how to make three specific Netgear routers into "access points" (I think "access point" means the same as "bridge mode") If you're router is not on this list, I would imagine you would set it up in a similar way ...

»kb.netgear.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/965

In bridge mode you're basically turning your router into a switch. So it just passes IP addresses from your router's range of addresses (in this case your UC520).

I'm currently connecting an Asus wireless router (in bridge mode) to a Linksys wireless router. I get a dynamic address when I connect to the Asus. As far as the Linksys is concerned, I'm just plugging my device into one of its ports. (I've got both static and Dynamic ports set up on the Linksys.)



UHF
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reply to gweidenh

said by gweidenh:

I think you got it.

Just give the Netgear a static IP address. Make sure to turn off DHCP server on the Netgear, and you should be good to go.

Make sure not to use the "WAN" or "Internet" port anymore on the Netgear. Just plug it into one of the 4 primary switch ports.

This is how I do it. I have two wireless routers running exactly this way on my LAN acting as access points. By not using the WAN port and turning off DHCP you effectively make it an access point only.


Davesnothere
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3 edits

said by UHF:

said by gweidenh:

I think you got it.

Just give the Netgear a static IP address. Make sure to turn off DHCP server on the Netgear, and you should be good to go.

Make sure not to use the "WAN" or "Internet" port anymore on the Netgear. Just plug it into one of the 4 primary switch ports.

This is how I do it. I have two wireless routers running exactly this way on my LAN acting as access points. By not using the WAN port [of the Netear] and turning off DHCP [server of the Netear] you effectively make it an access point only.

 
That will likely work, however some routers will not let you use one of their LAN ports like that - but it is worth a try, as it would get all of your PCs etc onto the same subnet as the new router (10.0.0.xxx) and by doing that, you can share some folders much more easily among your PCs. - AND, any port forwarding you might do would only have one step to it rather than two.

A 2nd way which almost always works (but will less likely allow local folder sharing in some cases) would be to hook the WAN of the Netgear to one of the LAN ports of the new router and hook a PC to the Netgear to log into and set the Netgear to get its external IP by DHCP, like you had it on a cable company feed (and also enable the Netgear's own DHCP server for the PCs). - But then all PCs on the Netgear would be on a different subnet (maybe 192.168.0.xxx) and it would be a royal song and dance to make them see any of the PCs which might be directly on the new router - unless all PCs could still be running from the Netgear anyway.

IF your Netgear has a 'bridge mode', set it THAT way and hook it as in my 2nd example, but being sure that the Netgear has its DHCP server (for the PCs) disabled in this case.

A 4th way would be (as you suggested) to buy a separate piece of gear called a 'Wireless Access Point' (WAP) and hook it to a LAN port on the new router instead of using the Netgear any more there. - Easy to set up, would work well, but would cost more $$.


mdshs

@bell.ca

Great thanks so much! Is there any benefit to using an actual wireless access point? Or is this basically doing the same thing, just that a wireless access point has no routing features? Like curious if there's any benefit as I don't mind buying a wireless access point but I won't if it's not necessary.



Davesnothere
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1 edit

said by mdshs :

....Is there any benefit to using an actual wireless access point ?

Or is this basically doing the same thing, just that a wireless access point has no routing features ? ....

 
A true WAP is easier to configure because the router function is not there (so less side issues), but otherwise behaves about the same if the same age/generation.

A true WAP will also not have the 4 LAN jacks which most routers have, forcing you in your case to have to hook any wired PCs to the new router, which if it is really a phone, may not have 4 LAN jacks either.

The only reasons to buy more hardware might be if you wanted 'N' type WiFi and the Netgear had only 'G' type, and/or if you wanted Gigabit LAN outputs and the NetGear had only 100Mbps outputs. - In such a case, you might shop for a newer complete router, looking for one which lets you disable NAT (like a bridge mode) as well as with those other 2 features.