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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to Thinkdiff

Re: Trying to print to network printers

said by Thinkdiff:

said by onebadmofo:

said by Thinkdiff:

Do you have a Windows Server or OS X Server? Are your Macs bound to an Active Directory domain or OD domain or both? I would think if the AD server was sharing the printers, they'd show up as Active Directory, not Open.

Windows server. I believe that particular one is 2003.
They're bound to an AD.

If you only have an Active Directory server, I have no idea why they're showing up as Open Directory. Did you install the OD schema for Active Directory on your Win 2003 server? Did it ever work this way before?

What do you get if you go to the Windows tab? Do the printers show up there?

Well none of us set the server up. Our former IT director did.
So if OD is set up we weren't aware of it.
And as far as this working before, we never had Macs on our network before.

Here's what shows on the Windows tab...


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joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6
reply to onebadmofo

I'd start tracing it. Add the printer that shows up as OpenDirectory then go to »localhost:631 and see where they are printing to (Ip/hostname)

And either fix it, add an Open Directory (Mac OS X Server), or Linux machine with CUPS for printer sharing.
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not

@comcast.net

This is very simple. Direct IP printing bypasses the security of the AD and sends the print jobs directly to the printer. Once there, the burden of print/don't print access is left up to the printer in question. Some copiers have the ability to require a logon to be passed from its driver along with the print job that was sent in order to allow for the print job to process. If this isn't passed, it won't print. Since you're stating that you can print to these printers all day long if you add them as IP printers, then your problem is with your Mac authenticating to the AD server. Your options are to either keep setting them up as IP printers or properly configure your Mac to authenticate to the AD server.



onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1

said by not :

This is very simple. Direct IP printing bypasses the security of the AD and sends the print jobs directly to the printer. Once there, the burden of print/don't print access is left up to the printer in question. Some copiers have the ability to require a logon to be passed from its driver along with the print job that was sent in order to allow for the print job to process. If this isn't passed, it won't print. Since you're stating that you can print to these printers all day long if you add them as IP printers, then your problem is with your Mac authenticating to the AD server. Your options are to either keep setting them up as IP printers or properly configure your Mac to authenticate to the AD server.

Ok I thought did I set the Mac up to authenticate. Under system preferences, Users and Groups, Log In Options, it shows our domain name as the Network account server.

Is this not how you do it? If not, then how would I properly authenticate the Mac to the AD?
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Thinkdiff
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-07
Bronx, NY
kudos:11

Did you try joako's suggestion of looking at the local CUPS page to see where it's actually sending the print jobs to? Does it look like the jobs are being sent to the AD server, directly to the printer, or nowhere?

I'm still thinking the AD server is just misconfigured and, without having access to an AD server to test, it'd be up to your Windows Admin to track down. It could be misconfigured network settings, authentication issues (as not pointed out), or a slew of other things.
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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
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Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to joako

For localhost to work, do I need to have a Mac server running?
Cause all of these printers are on a windows 2003 server.

Hmm...linux machine. I may try that. Would Ubuntu work for that? And if it so, would have to be a server edition?
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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to Thinkdiff

Your thought of the AD server being misconfigured isn't a far stretch since those who run it seem to not really care. I have access to the server but I'm not entirely sure on where I would start since I've never messed with it before.
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Thinkdiff
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join:2001-08-07
Bronx, NY
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reply to onebadmofo

CUPS is the printing service for OS X. You'll always be able to access »localhost:631 on a Mac.

Joako was suggesting to add a printer on one of your Macs, then go to that URL on the same Mac and check the printers listed there.
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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1

said by Thinkdiff:

CUPS is the printing service for OS X. You'll always be able to access »localhost:631 on a Mac.

Joako was suggesting to add a printer on one of your Macs, then go to that URL on the same Mac and check the printers listed there.

Aaah ok.

Well I've done that but I'm seeing this:
Web Interface is Disabled

The web interface is currently disabled. Run "cupsctl WebInterface=yes" to enable it.

Not sure how to enable it.

Don't mind me, I'm still very new to in's and out's of the Mac world. But damn is it fun learning it.

Edit---I copied the text into a terminal window. And now I have access. I'll continue with other directions and post back.
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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to onebadmofo

Ok. On my Mac I was able to navigate to the printers area in localhost. I found the printer I added through the list (not through IP), I chose to send a test print and this screen was shown.
So...something is not authenticating.
I then clicked release job, but nothing printed.

I was able to print a test page from an IP added printer though.

I'm not sure where to go from here.



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Thinkdiff
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join:2001-08-07
Bronx, NY
kudos:11

Looks like not was right. At least you know that the printer is being added with the correct path now and it's talking to the AD server.

Are you currently logged in with a local account or domain account on the Mac? If you login with the same domain account on a Windows PC, you can print to the shared printer without an issue?
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not

@comcast.net

In addition, the printer shares you're seeing in AD can also be security controlled to give just certain people access to print to it. If you aren't a member of a group or your individual account isn't added to the printer share to have access, you won't be able to print to it.

I have to ask though... if it's printing via IP direct printing, what's the big deal? It's actually more efficient this way anyway, you're asking the printer to do all the spooling work as taking one thing out of the chain by not adding additional work on the 2003 server. Where's the issue here? Yes, it's not connected via the share, but who cares... in a way, you're actually breaking the security the company has probably put in place to keep people from printing on printers they don't want you to... unless you connect to them directly via IP and skip the server middleman who's providing access security.

Also, 2003 server has some limitations in terms of printer share access to a Mac, so this may be some where your issues are coming from. Do yourself a favor and if it's printing via IP, leave it at that. Unless you're going to lose your job over printing to a printer you're not supposed to, congratulations, you've solved your problem... now go on with life.



onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
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reply to Thinkdiff

Umm...well...thats the thing. I was able to join the Mac to the domain. The user name I'm using is just a username to the Mac. If I were to change that to match my domain username, would that constitute me logging into the domain?

And yes logging onto a windows machine with the proper domain creeds will allow you to print to it.
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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
join:2002-03-30
Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to not

said by not :

In addition, the printer shares you're seeing in AD can also be security controlled to give just certain people access to print to it. If you aren't a member of a group or your individual account isn't added to the printer share to have access, you won't be able to print to it.

nah that's not an issue here. I have admin rights to everything. (as does everyone else in IT) And none of our printers have security restrictions on them.

I have to ask though... if it's printing via IP direct printing, what's the big deal? It's actually more efficient this way anyway, you're asking the printer to do all the spooling work as taking one thing out of the chain by not adding additional work on the 2003 server. Where's the issue here? Yes, it's not connected via the share, but who cares... in a way, you're actually breaking the security the company has probably put in place to keep people from printing on printers they don't want you to... unless you connect to them directly via IP and skip the server middleman who's providing access security.

Also, 2003 server has some limitations in terms of printer share access to a Mac, so this may be some where your issues are coming from. Do yourself a favor and if it's printing via IP, leave it at that. Unless you're going to lose your job over printing to a printer you're not supposed to, congratulations, you've solved your problem... now go on with life.

I see your point. And agree with the efficiency when adding via IP. But if the CEO or any other user who has a Mac, has to add a printer, they're not going to know how to do it via IP. The simplicity of adding a printer from the list is a much easier way for the end user to go about doing it.

Also in our company all printers are accessible from anyone. Printers are basically assigned by location of where the end user is at in the building.

And I was thinking 2003 might be an issue here. And had a thought of moving the printers to a win 7 server. But that would be a HUGE task...moving every printer individually.

oooor...I could simply copy the printers that would be used by Mac to a Win 7 server and see if that helps.
hmmm...any thoughts on if that would work better?



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onebadmofo
gat gnitsoP
Premium
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Reading, PA
kudos:1
reply to onebadmofo

I found something interesting. Well, interesting to me. It may be "duh" to you guys though.
If I connect the laptop to an ethernet cable I'm able to get this drop down list of printers nearby.
I was able to add the one 4240 printer without issue. And I'm able to print to it as well.




But when I disconnect the ethernet cable and just use wifi, the mac doesn't have proper communication with the printer any longer. And fails on sending a print to it. Connect the cable back up to the Mac and it will send the print again.

This however, does not help in adding printers from the list and to be able to print to them. Ethernet or not, that issue is still the same. You can add 'em, but can't print to them.

But this made me think, If the Mac can see/add, AND print using the printers nearby method when connected to the ethernet cable... Can it be forced to see other printers on the network that are on different IP ranges? And if it can be, can it also be forced to see them through wifi?
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true

@execulink.com
reply to not

said by not :

This is very simple. Direct IP printing bypasses the security of the AD and sends the print jobs directly to the printer. Once there, the burden of print/don't print access is left up to the printer in question. Some copiers have the ability to require a logon to be passed from its driver along with the print job that was sent in order to allow for the print job to process. If this isn't passed, it won't print. Since you're stating that you can print to these printers all day long if you add them as IP printers, then your problem is with your Mac authenticating to the AD server. Your options are to either keep setting them up as IP printers or properly configure your Mac to authenticate to the AD server.

True, I did this at school to print for free


not

@comcast.net
reply to onebadmofo

said by onebadmofo:

I found something interesting. Well, interesting to me. It may be "duh" to you guys though.
If I connect the laptop to an ethernet cable I'm able to get this drop down list of printers nearby.
I was able to add the one 4240 printer without issue. And I'm able to print to it as well.
[att=1]

But when I disconnect the ethernet cable and just use wifi, the mac doesn't have proper communication with the printer any longer. And fails on sending a print to it. Connect the cable back up to the Mac and it will send the print again.

This however, does not help in adding printers from the list and to be able to print to them. Ethernet or not, that issue is still the same. You can add 'em, but can't print to them.

But this made me think, If the Mac can see/add, AND print using the printers nearby method when connected to the ethernet cable... Can it be forced to see other printers on the network that are on different IP ranges? And if it can be, can it also be forced to see them through wifi?

You have a few problems. One, your WIFI is somehow filtering the advertising that these printers are putting out for the Mac to see them. Adding them via that screen in the Printer Setup screen is the "correct" way to add printers to a Mac. If you cannot see the printer on there when on WIFI, then your problem is your WIFI network.

As for your AD username and password. Unless you're storing that in the keychain and the Mac is smart enough to use it every time it needs access to an AD based resource, you'd need to match the local username and password on the Mac to your AD one. Think of it no different then using a Windows "Home" flavored OS. That version doesn't allow you to save your domain username and password in the user account info, so the only way to seamlessly integrate the two logins so the user doesn't have to constantly enter passwords is to simply match up the local username and password with their AD one and you're done. Simple stuff.


Thinkdiff
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-07
Bronx, NY
kudos:11
reply to onebadmofo

If you're not logging into the Mac with a domain user account, that's almost definitely the problem. The AD server would have to be setup so anybody could print, not just Domain Members.

If you login to the Mac using a domain user name, it should print.

You could also try manually editing the printer URL in the CUPS interface to:

smb: //user:password@domainserver/printername
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University of Southern California - Fight On!