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antdude
A Ninja Ant
Premium,VIP
join:2001-03-25
United State
kudos:5

EFF Reminds Everyone Open Wi-Fi Hotspots Are a Good Thing

»EFF Reminds Everyone Open Wi-Fi Hotspots Are a Good Thing -- "Launches New Coalition to Build Secure, Open Technology"

Not really IMO.


ashrc4
Premium
join:2009-02-06
australia

2 recommendations

I wonder if they will combine that idea with with this:
»www.theage.com.au/digital-life/s···e1b.html
Then include the tec for home routers.

What permanent grid does the future hold?
--
Paradigm Shift beta test pilot. "Dying to defend one's small piece of suburb...Give me something global...STAT!

Kearnstd
Space Elf
Premium
join:2002-01-22
Mullica Hill, NJ
kudos:1

2 recommendations

reply to antdude
as long as people like the MAFIAA and the FBI consider IP=Person I will not run open wifi from my house.

Keeping it secure is easier than trying to setup firewalls and such to block torrents and other content.
--
[65 Arcanist]Filan(High Elf) Zone: Broadband Reports


Selenia
Gentoo Convert
Premium
join:2006-09-22
Fort Smith, AR
kudos:2

1 recommendation

Not to mention getting the feds knocking down your door for hacking, child porn, etc. Sure, it won't be enough to prove anything in court and you will probably get cleared, after they seize all your electronic equipment and poke thier noses into every facet of your life. As to the second thing, to be accused is guilty in the eyes of the public, whether you get exhonerated or not. There are worse things that can happen than getting a MAFIAA extortion letter. Besides all that, you are likely still guilty of violating your ToS and might find yourself disconnected. As a result, I secure my APs using the best available security.
--
A fool thinks they know everything.

A wise person knows enough to know they couldn't possibly know everything.

There are zealots for every OS, like every religion. They do not represent the majority of users for either.


ashrc4
Premium
join:2009-02-06
australia
reply to ashrc4
said by ashrc4:

I wonder if they will combine that idea with with this:
»www.theage.com.au/digital-life/s···e1b.html
Then include the tec for home routers.

What permanent grid does the future hold?

The article is no longer found on the previous link.
You can still view it here;
»www.smh.com.au/digital-life/smar···e1b.html


NetFixer
Bah Humbug
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
reply to antdude
said by antdude:

»EFF Reminds Everyone Open Wi-Fi Hotspots Are a Good Thing -- "Launches New Coalition to Build Secure, Open Technology"

Not really IMO.

If you are a lawyer then anything that can spark litigation or result in criminal charges is a very good thing.
--
A well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.

When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny.


joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6

1 recommendation

reply to antdude
What if you setup TOR and proxy your open WiFi traffic through it? Is that even possible?
--
PRescott7-2097


Selenia
Gentoo Convert
Premium
join:2006-09-22
Fort Smith, AR
kudos:2

1 recommendation

Linux based router and iptables. Tor or VPN client can be run right on the router, tunneling all traffic through it. If you run a public AP, you might block all UDP traffic. I allow the common UDP ports that many VPN hosts use because I respect ones right to obfuscate their traffic using a host they trust, which the clients using UDP hosts alleviates router state table load and the traffic is masked often better than through Tor as OpenVPN uses very good encryption and has many off-shore hosts. Even L2TP is better as Tor does not encrypt at all. You may want to consider one of those as your tunnel instead of Tor, especially, among paid ones, ones that take Bitcoin. There are a few free decent ones in countries that do not require logs.

Those public APs I helped a few shop owners setup used Tor because the owners wanted that setup, because they trusted the Tor project. A few bigger projects used a VPN tunnel back to Corporate for their access. Might not be as good of idea with the new laws. Offshore VPNing in a country like Romania seems the best choice for public APs right now.

I run 1 that gives simple basic access, while trying to block illegal content, to http sites. It bases its filters on WoT rankings and whitelists, as opposed to blacklist. So only sites that are ranked or ranked decent make it through the transparent proxy, before being VPNed out. Their VPN connection goes through my VPN first, if they choose to use their own. I don't try and block them from any legitimate activity. In fact, it just mainly ensures no illegal activity comes from the IP of my connection or VPN host. So, it just forces them to use Tor or VPN themselves to not be restricted to only WoT trusted sites. In other words, safe browsing on an open AP is enforced. I don't think covering mine and clients safety on a public AP at my office(offered for free) is going too far. I can't prevent all illegal activity, but I can control what comes from my IP address or my VPN host's. Allowing them their own VPN connection over my VPN connection lets them guard their data and unblocks services, providing unfettered web. I found a hotel with a slightly less aggressive policy:restricting to basic ports but allowing most VPN ports.

Anyways, got yammering on. You can build a quiet box out of curbside computer parts. Underclock it enough to go fanless. Use a basic install of Linux with the tor client install and have iptables route all traffic on the incoming interface through Tor, block most or all UDP(vpn is at your descretion, though TCP VPN will be available to clients, should you choose to block all UDP). Hookup the old wireless router as an AP/switch(some have the option, some reversing the wan port for one of the LAN ports and disabling DHCP works). Have the box(instead of the old router) use DHCP to hand out IPs(after all it's a public network) and do the routing. The old router now only has the job of handling wireless. I guarantee you the network will handle many more connections without even flinching. Even an old rebuilt Pentium 3 box(my router) has infinitely better routing performance than consumer routers, However, I have found consumer router wireless performance very decent, when the router only has to handle that.
--
A fool thinks they know everything.

A wise person knows enough to know they couldn't possibly know everything.

There are zealots for every OS, like every religion. They do not represent the majority of users for either.