dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
6
share rss forum feed


PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD
reply to norbert26

Re: Boiler heating pipes and extended power outage.

Froze the oil line? Why was there water in it?



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada

said by PSWired:

Froze the oil line? Why was there water in it?

Fuel oil and diesel start to gel about about 32F - if there's not enough winter additivies, it basically stops flowing around 16F... That's why there's specific "summer" and "winter" fuel blends.


tschmidt
Premium,MVM
join:2000-11-12
Milford, NH
kudos:9
Reviews:
·G4 Communications
·Fairpoint Commun..
·Hollis Hosting
reply to PSWired

said by PSWired:

Froze the oil line? Why was there water in it?

Good question. Before we built our house we moved a mobile home to the property. The furnace was designed for kerosene. When I had the fuel tank installed I asked: Why kerosene not regular fuel oil.

The answer was simple: "What happens to oil in cold weather?"

/tom

bemis

join:2008-07-18
Reading, MA
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to LazMan

said by LazMan:

said by PSWired:

Froze the oil line? Why was there water in it?

Fuel oil and diesel start to gel about about 32F - if there's not enough winter additivies, it basically stops flowing around 16F... That's why there's specific "summer" and "winter" fuel blends.

LazMan has it--it didn't freeze, poor choice of words, it "congealed".


PSWired

join:2006-03-26
Annapolis, MD

Gotcha. We have a bunch of above-ground outdoor heating oil tanks around here in MD, I guess it just doesn't get cold enough here for them to gel up. Outdoor diesel tanks for standby generators are popular too.


bemis

join:2008-07-18
Reading, MA
Reviews:
·Comcast

A friend of mine here in MA has an outdoor tank--it looks like a stainless steel port-a-potty--and he mentioned it has some sort of a heating element that kicks in at temps below 40*F (said because he was complaining about the costs to convert from his 1950's below ground tank, "and to top it off I needed an electrician to add a circuit for the heating element")



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to PSWired

said by PSWired:

Gotcha. We have a bunch of above-ground outdoor heating oil tanks around here in MD, I guess it just doesn't get cold enough here for them to gel up. Outdoor diesel tanks for standby generators are popular too.

With proper additives and blending, diesel and fuel oil can be flowable to about -40... But it's all about the right mix.

Winter and Arctic diesel remain flowable at very low temperatures, but can be too thin for normal operation at higher temps... Summer fuels get too thick at lower temps.

I've got about a half-million litres of diesel and fuel oil stored at various sites; mostly in above-ground tanks - it's a bit of a dance to keep the blends right for the time of year.