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yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to Buddha2oo9

Re: Rogers "Ultimate Fibre" internet

said by Buddha2oo9:

Does anybody have any kind of insight about when they're going to roll this out towards Mississauga? lol .. This would be amazing for work purposes.

This is still considered a trial within the Forest Hill area of Toronto, so you can bet it's not coming to your neighbourhood anytime soon.

If you need fibre, I'm sure Rogers Business Services and a variety of other companies would be happy to lay fibre to your premises if you're willing to cough up the money.

Buddha2oo9

join:2009-05-05
reply to bt

Does anybody have any kind of insight about when they're going to roll this out towards Mississauga? lol .. This would be amazing for work purposes.


Poser

join:2002-07-28
reply to Orthak

Look at the history of aviation. When planes became faster and more powerful, we eventually aimed our sights on the moon.

With 250mbps, you will set your sights on bigger targets now that you have the technology to acquire them.


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to simon726

said by simon726:

I wonder what particular "equipment" Rogers utilizes for its Ultimate Fibre internet? I'm guessing the similar equipment that Bell uses for it's Fibe FTTH services.

It could also be similar to the one down in Ottawa's newest neighbourhood (aka "Sohowest", but it is now known as "Trailwest"). I found this here and here.

It's likely a similar system to Bell Fibe FTTH or FiOS. The deployments you've linked are all RFoG deployments and the speed of RFoG deployments is limited to the speed a DOCSIS modem can provide, therefore it is unlikely that the ultimate fibre uses RFoG as 4 bonded channels can't provide 250mbps on the upstream.

Also the Ultimate fibre service is supported through a different team which likely uses a different billing and provisioning system. One of the main selling features for MSOs to use RFoG is that they can utilize the same customer premise and back end equipment and systems.

simon726

join:2006-12-21
Ajax, ON
reply to bt

I wonder what particular "equipment" Rogers utilizes for its Ultimate Fibre internet? I'm guessing the similar equipment that Bell uses for it's Fibe FTTH services.

It could also be similar to the one down in Ottawa's newest neighbourhood (aka "Sohowest", but it is now known as "Trailwest"). I found this here and here.


eeeaddict

join:2010-02-14
reply to Qsig

if that wasn't the crippled 500gb service they like to have this could be sort of a good deal (less than $1 a megabit)



Qsig

join:2009-05-18
Kanata, ON
reply to tj_blues

said by tj_blues:

Are talking about "real" FTTH or RFoG (Rf over Glass)?

cheers

In my neighbourhood it's RFoG right now which I was disappointed with but doing 250 synchronous would most likely mean FTTH.

tj_blues

join:2007-08-17
Mississauga, ON
reply to Rogers_Chris

Are talking about "real" FTTH or RFoG (Rf over Glass)?

cheers



Qsig

join:2009-05-18
Kanata, ON
reply to bt

It's up on the Rogers packages page now:

»www.rogers.com/web/Rogers.portal···ts=hide#

226 per month with 500 GB cap.


elec999

join:2005-12-19
reply to bt

I'm guessing $250?


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to eeeaddict

said by eeeaddict:

except that its free so in this case that may not be true

Regular consumers who aren't tech savvy will shop for their internet service by calling Rogers or visiting a retail outlet. You cannot sign up for 250/250 through any of those channels. You need to qualify yourself online and then someone from a special team contacts you to set everything up. The people who will sign up for this probably have heard of it through this website or another tech oriented website and are aware of what a GB is.

Also in the Toronto area, it is only deployed in a highly affluent area. Those with higher incomes usually won't just jump on something because it's free for the first year. They're often more interested in the long term costs.


llamas1234

@rogers.com
reply to yyzlhr

or afford it...


eeeaddict

join:2010-02-14
reply to yyzlhr

except that its free so in this case that may not be true


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to effram

Let's not lose sight of the fact that the only people who are going to sign up for the 250/250 tier are going to be people who actually understand how usage works and will know exactly what they're getting themselves into.


effram

join:2012-11-01
Orangeville, ON
reply to Haris567

said by Haris567 :

said by Orthak:

said by elwoodblues :
Not to mention a cap that you can burn through in about 5 minutes.
I've never understood this logic.

So tell me this do you still use the same bandwidth you used in dial up days? This should be pretty obvious that the higher the speed the more the usage. Eg someone who watches YouTube videos in 360 might switch to 1080 when there is no buffer wait. That's just one out of countless ways your behavior changes when you have better speed. Others might get TV through Internet with better speeds. Like I said, our usage has come a long way from dial up days.

Exactly. Faster speeds mean you can do more data-intensive things in a shorter amount of time. This means you could be on the internet the same amount of time as you've always been but have used way more data than you would have before. It's not hard to understand but sadly many people aren't getting the correlation.

The incumbents get it, that is the very reason they are all too happy to increase speeds. It makes them look like they want to make your internet experience more pleasant and at the same time charge you for overages when you inevitably exceed their silly ever-shrinking caps.


Haris567

@teksavvy.com
reply to Orthak

said by Orthak:

said by elwoodblues :
Not to mention a cap that you can burn through in about 5 minutes.
I've never understood this logic.

So tell me this do you still use the same bandwidth you used in dial up days? This should be pretty obvious that the higher the speed the more the usage. Eg someone who watches YouTube videos in 360 might switch to 1080 when there is no buffer wait. That's just one out of countless ways your behavior changes when you have better speed. Others might get TV through Internet with better speeds. Like I said, our usage has come a long way from dial up days.

Skyler0

join:2008-08-16
Oshawa, ON
reply to Orthak

You make a solid point, but as someone who went from 36/1 to 75/2 for the increased cap that we are still getting very close and going over frequently despite the difference in cap (150GB -> 250GB).

On the old plan we would always be in the same range as we are now. Getting very close if not going over.


st7860

join:2004-05-13
San Francisco, CA
reply to bt

downtown vancouver has had residential 300mbps down/15mbps up, with a 1000gb cap $103/mo, for quite some time already, although not from rogers/shaw/telus.



I_H8_Spam

join:2004-03-10
St Catharines, ON
reply to Orthak

said by Orthak:

said by elwoodblues :
Not to mention a cap that you can burn through in about 5 minutes.
I've never understood this logic.
The only way more bandwidth would be consumed, is if you spent more time downloading and surfing the internet. In which case, why do you believe your habits would change because of faster internet?

I posted the comment on the front page article as well.

If you sprang a leak, left to seed popular torrent, hacked/opened router, video game patcher left to seed to others, ect ect.

250 MBps can do some serious damage in a capped environment.
--
AFK: Attack, fight, kill!! The healer is telling you to go pull mobs.
WTF: Way to fight! The healer is applauding your tactical genius


MJB

join:2012-01-29
reply to bt

rogers - 250 mbit plan - both directions. 500 gb cap
me - i'll pass
rogers - why
me - ur scum since your internet is unaffordable to the canadian consumer
rogers - ok
me - bye rogers. never have been your customer


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to eeeaddict

said by eeeaddict:

how much will the new package cost?

This is a beta product right now, so only beta testers will know. It's free for the first year if you live in the beta testing area. They should see the monthly service fee charged and credited on their bill for the first year. CSRs will have no clue on pricing either as the product codes are not visible to them and the product is supported by an entirely separate department at this time.

eeeaddict

join:2010-02-14
reply to bt

how much will the new package cost?



BliZZardX
Premium
join:2002-08-18
Toronto, ON
reply to Dluckychance

You can't get the 80% off deal unless you also have cable TV, and you have to pay for cable TV at the full rate, so it depends on a persons situation. As an internet only customer Bell is cheaper and has the better upload speeds on lower tiers.



Dluckychance

@ionecoproducts.com
reply to bt

I'm on Rogers Ultimate and getting download speeds of 275Mbps and 10Mbps uploads (I don't upload much so the 10Mbps doesn't bother me at all). I have been a Rogers customer since 1992 and getting s great deal for my internet. I get 80% of the $122.99 price so I only pay for $24.60 for a year without any contract.....loving it
I do say though with the faster speeds get pretty closes at my max 250Gb limits.


bt

join:2009-02-26
canada
kudos:1
reply to TheFerret

said by TheFerret:

Lets say you want to see something that is 500MB and takes 12 hours to download, you would download it over those 12 hrs and not do much with your connection. Now, lets say it takes 2 hrs to download the same thing, which means after those 2 hours, you would watch that thing and then want to watch something else. This means that you would use a lot more bandwidth with a faster connection than a slower one. Overall, it's the same bandwidth but you can do so much more over the same period of time comparing fast bandwidth to slow. This is how much more bandwidth gets used when you have faster internet.

Except that has drastically diminishing returns over a certain speed, where consuming the content starts to take longer than downloading it does.

Under ideal conditions, the slowest connection Rogers offers will download a TV show (in HD) in under half the time it takes to watch it. Under ideal conditions, the 2nd slowest connection they've got will download a full Blu-ray rip in less time than it takes to watch.

We're well past that point for small households, as far as downstream goes.

Multi-user households (that don't share the same taste in media content) might not be there yet, but there's still a point where the connection becomes fast enough that the time it takes to consume what they download is longer than the time it takes to download it.


TheFerret
The Chesse Stands Alone
Premium
join:2003-12-24
Toronto, ON
reply to Orthak

Lets say you want to see something that is 500MB and takes 12 hours to download, you would download it over those 12 hrs and not do much with your connection. Now, lets say it takes 2 hrs to download the same thing, which means after those 2 hours, you would watch that thing and then want to watch something else. This means that you would use a lot more bandwidth with a faster connection than a slower one. Overall, it's the same bandwidth but you can do so much more over the same period of time comparing fast bandwidth to slow. This is how much more bandwidth gets used when you have faster internet.
--
Run Dog, Run...


34764170

join:2007-09-06
Etobicoke, ON
reply to bt

said by bt:

500GB data cap.

Pathetic for what it'll cost.

Orthak

join:2012-11-09

1 edit
reply to elwoodblues

said by elwoodblues :
Not to mention a cap that you can burn through in about 5 minutes.
I've never understood this logic.

Let us assume a test file, a video clip 500MB in size. You will consume the exact same amount of bandwidth downloading that 500MB video file at 31.25 MBps (250 Mbps) as you would downloading it at say 5.6 MBps (45 Mbp) only you will do so, much faster.

The same goes with web-surfing. One can assume your YouTube viewing habits will remain the same. The only difference being, you will load those YouTube video's a lot faster, but it certainly does not mean you somehow consume more bandwidth.

Let me put it in these terms. Take a cereal bowl and a drinking straw. Then take exactly 1 cup of water. Using a funnel, poor the water down the straw into the bowl and time how long it takes to get all the water into the bowl. Repeat the same experiment but instead of using a drinking straw, use say a toilet paper roll. Time how long it takes to get the water into the bowl. The exact same 1 cup of water is getting from point A to point B, only using the toilet paper roll will allow more water to flow through thus reducing the time it takes.

Now, unless I have been mislead in my understanding of how bandwidth works, I don't see where the extra bandwidth consumption would come from. The only way more bandwidth would be consumed, is if you spent more time downloading and surfing the internet. In which case, why do you believe your habits would change because of faster internet?


mozerd
Light Will Pierce The Darkness
Premium,MVM
join:2004-04-23
Nepean, ON
reply to MichelR

said by MichelR:

Tell me exactly 500Gb of what you would download in 5 minutes? If you download 500Gb of movies, you still have to watch them...

Many families today have multiple devices connecting from their homes to the Internet via wifi. Devices like iPhones, iPads, Tablets, etc.

Bandwidth utilization can add up pretty fast with many active devices all doing their thing.

5 minutes is a straw-man
--
David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
Information Technology for Home and Business

MichelR

join:2011-07-03
Ottawa, ON
Reviews:
·Start Communicat..
·voip.ms
·Rogers Hi-Speed
reply to elwoodblues

said by elwoodblues:

Not to mention a cap that you can burn through in about 5 minutes.

Tell me exactly 500Gb of what you would download in 5 minutes? If you download 500Gb of movies, you still have to watch them...