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Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
reply to urbanriot

Re: Dell Ultrasharp U2412M on sale, $289

said by urbanriot:

Ah, it's an IPS. I thought $289 seemed overkill for a 24" display until I clicked on it.


I paid $485 for my Dell U2410 in early 2010. Both of these have LG panels. The U2410 is a 6 msec H-IPS panel; the U2412M is a 8 msec e-IPS panel.

And here's why the new ones cost less:
quote:
During 2009 LG.Display began to develop a new generation of e-IPS panels which is a sub-category of H-IPS. They simplifed the subpixel structure in comparison with H-IPS (similar to cPVA vs S-PVA) and increased the transparency of the matrix. In doing so, they have managed to reduce production costs significantly, aiming to compete with the low cost TN Film panels and Samsung's new cPVA generation. Because transparency is increased, they are able to reduce backlight intensity as you need less light to achieve the same luminance now. This helps keep costs down significantly compared with S-IPS.

The main drawback of e-IPS in comparison with S-IPS is that the viewing angles are smaller. When you take a look at an e-IPS matrix from a side, the image will lose its contrast as black turns into gray. On the other hand, there is no tonal shift (as with TN and cPVA matrixes) and the viewing angles, especially vertical ones, are still much larger than with TN. By the way, the contrast drop occurring when the screen is viewed from a side can be compensated by means of special correcting film (A-TW polarizer), but as e-IPS matrices are meant for midrange monitors and this film costs money, most products come without it. Some are actually 6-bit + AFRC modules in fact (as opposed to true 8-bit) which might explain how the costs are kept very low in some cases.

Although it's unknown what the "e" stands for here, it's likely that it means "economic" or similar, since these new panels are all about trying to keep production and retail costs low. With lower retail costs there is of course an added risk of inter panel variance, which may lead to some quality control issues in some models.

»www.tftcentral.co.uk/articles/co···tm#e-ips



Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8
We discussed most of these issues a year or so ago when the U2412M first appeared on Days of Deals. It comes down to the fact that it offers a particularly attractive price/performance for the average user looking for IPS-panel performance in a modern LED-backlit design. The U2410 is mainly a contender where the extended colour gamut is required. A similar tradeoff now exists in the 27" space with the release of the U2713HM alongside the U2711.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to Bob4
An e-IPS panel for all intents and purposes is no different than an MVA/PVA panel when it comes to contrast shifts from a far angle. If I had to chose between the two, I'll take a VA for its superior contrast ratio over an e-IPS.


Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8
I also found the comment about keeping costs down significantly by being able to reduce backlight intensity curious because the U2412M is an extraordinarily bright monitor, so much so that I have the brightness at 25% as my standard setting. High transparency or not, they certainly didn't skimp on backlighting.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
The fact that the U2412HM is so bright is a testament to the transparency of those panels.

Still, having owned e-IPS and AMVA panels, I'll take the AMVA for image quality any day.