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dib22

join:2002-01-27
Kansas City, MO
reply to dib22

Re: cement experts - does this look right?

Thanks all I am going to get him to bring it up.

That one corner and around the access port are the only areas where it is large and that corner is the only place I noticed rebar.

There are a couple small spots on the backside but it is no way 1/4 of the pour, in fact most of it looks pretty good that's why that corner caught my eye.

Thanks again everyone I will ask him if he has an inspection scheduled.



Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1
reply to dib22

UGH Honeycomb in concrete NOT GOOD ever.

»www.concreteconstruction.net/rep···ids.aspx



Archer0T8
aka UnrealArcher

join:2005-01-21
East York, ON
reply to dib22

You're looking at aggregate pop-out in the future when water gets into those voids and exerts pressure, nevermind when it freezes and expands.

The exposed rebar is also giving water a conduit to rust the rebar to no end, effectively making it useless.

I used to do concrete pour inspections up here, and I would have failed an inspection for that. I highly suggest you do the same.



PeeWee
Premium
join:2001-10-21
Madera, CA
reply to dib22

If it is a tract home he would still have a say by contacting the inspection authority himself.
--
Iphone. Helping computer illiteracy become popular since 2007



KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
Premium
join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
reply to dib22

I'd say that's horrendous.

Do-over.

Problem is they'll try and jack up expenses somewhere to cover it.



workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:2
reply to dib22

That is sub-par work.

I just had one poured for a room addition and it was fairly smooth throughout with no gravel showing.

Dave

--
I may have been born yesterday. But it wasn't at night.


nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to sancraig

said by sancraig:

If its just a spot or two we would normally patch it. If it was 1/4 of the pour or more we'd tear it out. It relly depends on what the contract states.

If 1/4 of pour?

MaynardKrebs
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to dib22

Do NOT let them backfill, patch, or otherwise cover this up before there is a city building inspection && an inspection by a structural engineer you hire.

Concrete vibration (consolidation) is something that is both easy to over-do & under-do. Over-do and the aggregate falls to the bottom; under-do and you get what's in the photos.

I always prefer to order self-consolidating concrete for large-scale foundation work (ie. Lafarge Agilia - or other similar 'plasticized' products from others) and then minimally vibrate using a 3/4"-1" vibrator. I have numerous core samples of concrete pour/placed this way and they always show proper uniform consolidation.



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN
reply to dib22

I'm a little late to the party but let me add my 2 cents anyway. In your first pic the honeycomb is so deep I can see the rebar. Whenever rebar is visible to the naked eye it's a problem and in no way can that be passed off as ok or good enough.


sancraig

join:2003-11-05
Saint Louis, MO
reply to nonymous

Yes, if they poured an entire homes foundation, and this was the the only issue he should count himself lucky.

Not to say he should accept this but there are much worse pours than that. Could of had a cold joint, could have been much worse.

Hell seen worse on bridge abutments, guess what they did? They patched it.

If it were my house I would rather them patch this 2'x2' area than cut it out and re-pour it with a seam. I think everybody is very optimistic thinking its all going to be re-poured cause of a 2x2 area.

Op please let us know what becomes of this.

Thanks



dib22

join:2002-01-27
Kansas City, MO
reply to dib22

Ok I mentioned it to him and he was told by the general contractor that it was "ok", I asked him if he mentioned that rebar was exposed and he said he did... great ehh?

From his understanding inspection will happen tue or wed.

Will update when he tells me what they said.

My understanding is that you want a nice solid sealed stem wall no matter what, but this house will be bricked... could they be counting on the brick to protect this section?

Could it be sealed to prevent the water if indeed it has the structural integrity?



cowboyro
Premium
join:2000-10-11
Shelton, CT
reply to dib22

Exposed rebar will rust.
Rust expands more than the steel, cracking the concrete.
What others said - take it up with the contractor, their fuck-up, their dime.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by cowboyro:

Exposed rebar will rust.
Rust expands more than the steel, cracking the concrete.
What others said - take it up with the contractor, their fuck-up, their dime.

Somehow I don't think the consensus on the DSL Home Improvement forum will have much influence in this issue. There is a chance the inspector will pass it, then what? Just saying


Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2

1 recommendation

Well, the first option would have the contractor guarantee it for 20 years minimum. The second option is to call in independents for analysis, and then sue.

Gotta love the ethics these days.
--
I'm not anti-social, I just don't like stupid people.



Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

said by Juggernaut:

Well, the first option would have the contractor guarantee it for 20 years minimum. The second option is to call in independents for analysis, and then sue.

Gotta love the ethics these days.

How many years will the OP be willing to spend paying lawyers and appearing in courtrooms? They have a lot of money and smart lawyers.

His best chance is the inspector rejecting it.


Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2

True enough. But, the cost down the road may make it viable, especially if there is negligence.

Admittedly, this may be a 50-50 proposition though. It's a CF for the owner.
--
I'm not anti-social, I just don't like stupid people.


AVonGauss
Premium
join:2007-11-01
Boynton Beach, FL
reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

Somehow I don't think the consensus on the DSL Home Improvement forum will have much influence in this issue. There is a chance the inspector will pass it, then what? Just saying

Without knowing the financial relationship, I'd definitely be inclined to call ahead to the inspector and/or be there for the inspection at a minimum if it were me.


Jack_in_VA
Premium
join:2007-11-26
North, VA
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Millenicom

1 recommendation

said by AVonGauss:

said by Jack_in_VA:

Somehow I don't think the consensus on the DSL Home Improvement forum will have much influence in this issue. There is a chance the inspector will pass it, then what? Just saying

Without knowing the financial relationship, I'd definitely be inclined to call ahead to the inspector and/or be there for the inspection at a minimum if it were me.

If it were me there is no way that I would not be there for that inspection....

sancraig

join:2003-11-05
Saint Louis, MO

1 recommendation

reply to dib22

said by dib22:

Could it be sealed to prevent the water if indeed it has the structural integrity?

Yes it can be with several patch products. Best would have been sand and cement on the day the wall forms were stripped. The wall would have been still green and would have adhered without any special patch.


dib22

join:2002-01-27
Kansas City, MO
reply to Jack_in_VA

said by Jack_in_VA:

If it were me there is no way that I would not be there for that inspection....

I am with you 100%!


dib22

join:2002-01-27
Kansas City, MO
reply to sancraig

said by sancraig:

If it were my house I would rather them patch this 2'x2' area than cut it out and re-pour it with a seam. I think everybody is very optimistic thinking its all going to be re-poured cause of a 2x2 area.

That area is the only big area... and the 'access portal' edges which is right near the bad corner... there is 1 pier that looks like this as well, I'll attach that here:




Other than the corner and that pier it generally looks pretty good.

Got any expert advise on how to seal up that re-bar? Some magic mix that will make it all good again?

nonymous
Premium
join:2003-09-08
Glendale, AZ
reply to sancraig

said by sancraig:

Yes, if they poured an entire homes foundation, and this was the the only issue he should count himself lucky.

Not to say he should accept this but there are much worse pours than that. Could of had a cold joint, could have been much worse.

Hell seen worse on bridge abutments, guess what they did? They patched it.

If it were my house I would rather them patch this 2'x2' area than cut it out and re-pour it with a seam. I think everybody is very optimistic thinking its all going to be re-poured cause of a 2x2 area.

Op please let us know what becomes of this.

Thanks

Repair the fault area if all else ia ok. Make me feel bad about driving over a bridge.


PoloDude
Premium,VIP
join:2006-03-29
Northport, NY
kudos:3

2 recommendations

reply to dib22

Holy crap that's a support pier!? Where's the cement? I wouldn't mount anything on that.



jrs8084
Premium
join:2002-03-02
Statesville, NC
kudos:1
reply to dib22

Well, I guess that is a splendid example of stratification.



Raphion

join:2000-10-14
Samsara
reply to dib22

Just to throw in my agreement with the others here, you might as well use sandstone as your foundation as that. Kinda looks like the concrete was already nearly set when they poured it?


boaterbob

join:2005-08-01
Moncks Corner, SC

If after all is said and done - and nothing is done to properly make things right - ask the contractor to sign a letter you write saying something like - "I have reviewed the areas of concern in the concrete poured at on and find the concrete to be sufficient quality and structural strength to properly support the planned house ....."

The idea is to make the contractor put in writing (you write, he signs the letter) that he acknowledges that the job is proper and that he says there will be no problem!

When he see the letter he may decide that maybe you are correct and the work should be done over (or corrected properly) rather than him putting his signature on the letter and be liable for any future problems.

Have him sign something!!



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

1 recommendation

said by boaterbob:

...
Have him sign something!!

That signature will bring a lot of comfort when the deck collapses and someone is injured when the pier crumbles. Or when a portion of the house is destroyed because the foundation just fell apart.

The foundation might be able to be fixed. The pier needs to be removed and completely redone. There is no way that it can be fixed and still have any strength close to what it was originally designed for. And even if I had to pay for it with my own dime, I'd be having my own inspection done over the entire pour. There's no telling what else is hidden just under the surface that you can't see.


ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA
reply to dib22

said by dib22:

A friend is having a house built and they poured the foundation walls and in a few spots they look like this...

[att=1]

[att=2]

Should these be re-done? I have the feeling they should but haven't said anything until I get some expert inputs... any ideas?

Not only that, but by the time it does fail and the contractor has closed that particular company name up and moved on to a new name, there will be no legal recourse.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS

1 recommendation

reply to dib22

Click for full size
I just had foundation work done myself. Here's what it should look like.

MaynardKrebs
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to dib22

said by dib22:

My understanding is that you want a nice solid sealed stem wall no matter what, but this house will be bricked... could they be counting on the brick to protect this section?

Are the sections we're looking at above or below grade?
If above grade, how much further up do they extend?

If this is above grade and there is only a couple of feet to the top of the pour, I'd still get it inspected, but for above grade it'll probably just be patched.

For patching, make sure that the existing concrete is thoroughly wetted with an acrylic bonding agent and then I'd probably use a non-shrink grout to fill the gaps.