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TheMG
Premium
join:2007-09-04
Canada
kudos:2
Reviews:
·NorthWest Tel
reply to JoeSchmoe007

Re: Water and natural gas availability during power outage.

Being out of natural gas here in the winter here would really suck, that's for sure.

Assuming electricity was still available, I wouldn't be surprised if transformers would overload from everyone trying to heat their houses with electricity (here, almost all heating is normally done with natural gas, and few people have air conditioning, thus the utility transformers server a greater number of houses than they would elsewhere).

That's assuming the stores don't run out of electric space heaters to sell, which they probably would in a hurry. Then again, people will likely re-purpose their ovens and electric clothes dryers as space heaters.

If both electricity and gas goes out during the winter, you're essentially screwed unless you happen to have a wood-burning stove to heat with. There's no way you're gonna heat a whole house with the electric output of a generator, unless it's a pretty big one, which pretty much no one has. It is not uncommon for us to have temperatures of -20C (-4F) or colder during the winter.

Thankfully, natural disasters in this area of Canada are extremely unlikely to happen during the winter. About the only natural disasters that could happen here are possibly flooding, and tornadoes, and neither of these can happen in the winter.

Nevertheless, it's still good to be prepared, and the best way to do that is to install a wood burning stove.



fifty nine

join:2002-09-25
Sussex, NJ
kudos:2

said by TheMG:

If both electricity and gas goes out during the winter, you're essentially screwed unless you happen to have a wood-burning stove to heat with. There's no way you're gonna heat a whole house with the electric output of a generator, unless it's a pretty big one, which pretty much no one has. It is not uncommon for us to have temperatures of -20C (-4F) or colder during the winter.

I agree with this fully. That's why I have a wood burning stove. I am quite frankly shocked by people who leave a critical function like heating their homes up to the whims of the grid.

But that's not the only solution. If you store fuel locally like LP (propane) or heating oil you can have a reserve that will not fall to the grid.

Everyone who can have a wood stove should have one. Even a pellet stove is a good backup.