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battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

Netflix consumes 33% of Peak Internet Traffic?

I'm going to call Bullshit, or at least on the headline.

I don't believe that Neflix consumes 33% of all internet traffic as this may suggest. I would believe that it consumes 33% of residential traffic headed to networks that are heavily dominated by residential users.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.

elefante72

join:2010-12-03
East Amherst, NY
This is real BS, because in most cases Netflix isn't crossing the "internet" at all (except for catalog refresh), it's being hosted in CDN's somewhere in the carriers intranet.

This is why they are apes**t about P2P because that actually costs them transit fees, and so does tunneling. So the more the content companies crack down, the higher the transit fees.

Netflix/streaming is glory to them because they can host that in-network and charge users for caps. A win win.

In any case Sandvine is a company that creates products to measure and bill for carriers, so they are no friend of mine. Of course they have a vested interest to find out ways to charge end users for bytes, even though that has very little to do with cost. The "internet is exploding" is crap, because it is not. These things for mobile are always shoddy, because in many cases these studies take into account wifi usage also. While it's usage it doesn't go against your cap (if you have one).

TheGuvnor9

join:2006-06-23
Beverly Hills, CA
Right, because both have nifty little measurement devices that track the entire interwebs....

lemonade

join:2003-12-13
Los Angeles, CA
reply to battleop
I think so too, 33% sounds like a lot... but without seeing their methodology, there's no way to know if the number is right...

rradina

join:2000-08-08
Chesterfield, MO
reply to battleop
The key could be "peak" traffic and how it's defined.

Regarding NetFlix, I thought they used someones edge caching service which means those video streams should be reasonably close to subscribers and not choking big distances on the Internet.

I have a router that tracks my usage. I'm right around 100GB/month. Sometimes less, sometimes more. Maybe a couple times a month, an Apple TV Movie is rented but the balance is surfing, Skype and gaming.

I have three boys who are avid gamers (Steam/Minecraft). When they don't game for a day because of other activities, the daily usage is below 1GB. Sometimes as little as 500MB. However, when they do game, Skype and what not, it's several GB/day and sometimes up to 10GB/day. Just this past week end it rained all day Sunday and they had a marathon day. One day consumed 9.4GB!

This is why CAPs are a rather imperfect means of classifying and penalizing "heavy users". Their game traffic is very light but it's constant. I never have slow Internet when they game and likewise, it can't be stressful for the ISP -- especially when many of the people they play are on the same cable system.

BiggA

join:2005-11-23
EARTH
reply to battleop
They may be looking at prime time when most people are at home, and most businesses aren't moving data around. It may also not count VPN connections and other "private" traffic.


damonlab
Premium
join:2001-05-02
Detroit, MI
reply to elefante72
said by elefante72:

This is real BS, because in most cases Netflix isn't crossing the "internet" at all (except for catalog refresh), it's being hosted in CDN's somewhere in the carriers intranet.

This is why they are apes**t about P2P because that actually costs them transit fees, and so does tunneling. So the more the content companies crack down, the higher the transit fees.

Netflix/streaming is glory to them because they can host that in-network and charge users for caps. A win win.

ISPs claim to want in-network traffic, yet they killed newsgroups.


battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to lemonade
If anything the head line should say something like 33% of Sandvine customers......


skuv

@rr.com
reply to elefante72
Two of the largest residential ISP's, Comcast and TWC, do not have Netflix CDN's on their network. Do you forget Comcast's big fight with Level(3), one of Netflix's CDN hosts, from a couple of years ago?

And it still counts as Internet traffic, even it did. It is still getting to the end user which is connected to the Internet.

axus

join:2001-06-18
Washington, DC
reply to elefante72
Sandvine was behind the TCP/IP-breaking shenanigans that Comcast was using on Bittorrent a few years ago.