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sirwoogie
Blah
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Carleton, MI

for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

For their standard DSL offering, they count the overhead in the bandwidth calculation. When you factor in ATM, PPPoE, and TCP/UDP overhead, that racks up to about 16-25% overhead depending on the size of the average packet sizes you get using the connection.

To add insult to injury, this also affects the speed you get as they don't account for the overhead in the "up to" speed. So, if you have a plan of 3Mbps/512Kbps, the MAXIMUM you could ever get is about 2.5Mbps/415Kbps. So, you can never reach your "up to" speed, but they also knock you on the meter because of the overhead.

They recently added a $3 increase on all of the classic plans, because you know it costs more to deliver those same bits they were doing before.

NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

Re: for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

said by sirwoogie:

To add insult to injury, this also affects the speed you get as they don't account for the overhead in the "up to" speed. So, if you have a plan of 3Mbps/512Kbps, the MAXIMUM you could ever get is about 2.5Mbps/415Kbps. So, you can never reach your "up to" speed, but they also knock you on the meter because of the overhead.

If you bothered to read the AT&T ToS, you would know that they sell "sync" speed. No matter what you measure down, if your modem holds sync at 3008 (for "Pro"), you are getting what you pay for at 2.5Mbps down.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

sirwoogie
Blah
Premium
join:2002-01-02
Carleton, MI

Re: for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

BS. I've re-read the ToS, and nowhere does it mention this "sync" speed you say I didn't bother to see. Go look for yourself:

»www.att.com/shop/internet/att-in···ice.html

Also highlighted here: »www.att.net/speedtiers the information for AT&T High Speed Internet Pro states: Downstream Speed Range 1.56 Mbps - 3.0 Mbps

Seems a little disingenuous to state the speed range is max of 3.0Mbps when in fact you can NEVER reach that, no matter what the traffic profile is. Stepping into my wayback machine... when I had DSL back in the day of SBC, they over-provisioned speed (and in fact stated this in the documentation to avoid confusion) so you could get the advertised rate.

ATT does this crap so they can get away with less while making the customer pay for more, while advertising it as if said customer could actually achieve it. The meter working on this principle is also just another stab in the back and nothing more than a money grab, especially for those of us with no other choice for wired Internet.

NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

Re: for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

said by sirwoogie:

BS. I've re-read the ToS, and nowhere does it mention this "sync" speed you say I didn't bother to see. Go look for yourself ...

I see it has changed since I last read the ToS. However, there is this in that linked document:
quote:
Service Capability Speeds should not be confused with Throughput Speed, which is the speed at which your modem receives and sends Internet access data (“Throughput Speed”).

Which is pretty much what I read before the changes. (Except that the old ToS explicitly mentioned "sync" speed.)

... when I had DSL back in the day of SBC, they over-provisioned speed (and in fact stated this in the documentation to avoid confusion) so you could get the advertised rate.

SBC never "overprovisioned" their service for as long as I had it; February 17, 2001 to some time in April, 2011. I started on 1536/128, which is what my modem synced at from day one of service.

NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

Re: for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

said by NormanS:

said by sirwoogie:

... when I had DSL back in the day of SBC, they over-provisioned speed (and in fact stated this in the documentation to avoid confusion) so you could get the advertised rate.

SBC never "overprovisioned" their service for as long as I had it; February 17, 2001 to some time in April, 2011. I started on 1536/128, which is what my modem synced at from day one of service.

I think that sirwoogie See Profile is confusing SBC with BellSouth. BellSouth did over provision their 3 mbps and 6 mbps aDSL service (but they under provisioned their 1.5 mbps service).
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.

dnoyeB
Ferrous Phallus

join:2000-10-09
Southfield, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast
That's a real shame. The fattening of the packet is within their own network. The data into and out of their network is the smaller unpackaged data. How can they charge you for the size of the data in their network!? That's like sending a letter to someone and being charged for the weight of the airplane if flew in.
--
dnoyeB
"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor man's wisdom [is] despised, and his words are not heard. " Ecclesiastes 9:16

NetFixer
Freedom is NOT Free
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage

Re: for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

said by dnoyeB:

That's a real shame. The fattening of the packet is within their own network. The data into and out of their network is the smaller unpackaged data. How can they charge you for the size of the data in their network!? That's like sending a letter to someone and being charged for the weight of the airplane if flew in.

Actually it is more analogous to including the weight of both the letter and the envelope (and even the weight of the postage stamp), which is how the USPS actually measures the weight of letters. So AT&T's method is actually based on a very commonly accepted use of paying for transportation of both the message and the envelope.

I am not a big fan of AT&T or their business practices, but in this case they are following a commonly accepted method of measurement for charging for the transportation of information (and I have no doubt that AT&T's shysters and bean counters have taken that commonly accepted measurement method into consideration).
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.

dnoyeB
Ferrous Phallus

join:2000-10-09
Southfield, MI
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Comcast

Re: for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

I don't agree. The envelope is under my control. It is not an add-on by the post office. it does not get bigger or smaller based on the POs technology. What I can't control is the size of the trucks and trains and planes the post office decides to use. I should not be charged for things outside of my control. I don't think that is standard practice.
--
dnoyeB
"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor man's wisdom [is] despised, and his words are not heard. " Ecclesiastes 9:16

NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC

Re: for classic ADSL, they count all the headers

ATM and PPPoE encapsulation are consistent; nothing at all like the differences between planes, trains, trucks, and boats.

Moreover, to address your misconception in another thread about a "different name for the same product", AT&T U-verse does away with ATM and PPPoE encapsulation; in effect, reducing the size of the envelope.

BTW, not just USPS, and not just letters. Having worked in shipping I know that FedEx and UPS fees are based on the gross weight of the package.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum