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jimk
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join:2006-04-15
Raleigh, NC
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reply to KrK

Re: Pretty sure a single Jammer would be easy to find

said by KrK:

So what would really be the point of such an attack?

Terrorists, for one, would love to be able to easily disrupt communications over a wide area. This is especially true if they can disrupt Government, public safety / first responders, etc.

Any wireless signal can be jammed, but in this case it appears to be easier and much more effective than with older technologies. Specifically, it takes less power to cover a larger area.


KrK
Heavy Artillery For The Little Guy
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join:2000-01-17
Tulsa, OK
I think Terrorists would rather make a big explosion then knock out everyone's internet on their phones temporarily.

If they could set up jammers to do this, they could also be planting bombs. I'd think they like the latter.

For example, which situation would appeal to a terrorist more: Knocking out LTE in an area, or: Bombing the power station and knocking out EVERYTHING in an area.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the merger of state and corporate power." -- Benito Mussolini


jimk
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Jamming the communications networks would be secondary to a primary attack (the big explosion)... just a way to create more chaos and slow down the response. That's why there is concern over emergency communication networks moving to a technology that may be more vulnerable to attack. At this point, however, it is too soon to tell if this is a significant threat or not.

pandora
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said by jimk:

Jamming the communications networks would be secondary to a primary attack (the big explosion)... just a way to create more chaos and slow down the response. That's why there is concern over emergency communication networks moving to a technology that may be more vulnerable to attack. At this point, however, it is too soon to tell if this is a significant threat or not.

Couldn't a country potentially use low earth satellites to shut down large areas of LTE? From the device specification, not a lot of power is needed.

Imagine China shutting down most US and European cell functionality concurrent with a move somewhere? Or worse, a country like Iran or North Korea jamming U.S. cellular as an annoyance / provocation. Taking out low earth satellites is within our capability, but it can be messy and can cause issues for years with regards to future launches (more debris in space).

It isn't just a non-national group of terrorists who could exploit this.

Maybe LTE needs to be rethought if possible, to tighten it up against the identified weaknesses.
--
"If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand." - Milton Friedman"