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SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1
reply to Jaber

Re: Drywall - Joint Compound On Cold(ish) Days?

If you're willing to rent a salamander for the days you are mudding, then you can go ahead. But I wouldn't chance it otherwise.. wait until spring.



Ken
Premium,MVM
join:2003-06-16
Markle, IN

said by SwedishRider:

If you're willing to rent a salamander for the days you are mudding, then you can go ahead. But I wouldn't chance it otherwise.. wait until spring.

You don't want to use a salamander for heat when doing drywall. First they put moisture into the air, which is the exact opposite of what you want when doing drywall. Second they put a thin layer of soot on the walls that makes it harder for the primer to bond properly. I learned these lessons the hard way. Drywall sub finished a new construction house and we went in to do all the finish carpentry and flooring. We ran a salamander out in the garage for a month to keep us warm while we worked out there cutting wood flooring, tile and all the trim. After we were done the house took primer and paint just fine, but when the garage was primed it all bubbled up and peeled off the walls. So I never made that mistake again, electric heat only after the drywall is hung.


SwedishRider
Rider on the Storm
Premium
join:2006-01-11
not Sweden
kudos:1

said by Ken:

said by SwedishRider:

If you're willing to rent a salamander for the days you are mudding, then you can go ahead. But I wouldn't chance it otherwise.. wait until spring.

You don't want to use a salamander for heat when doing drywall. First they put moisture into the air, which is the exact opposite of what you want when doing drywall. Second they put a thin layer of soot on the walls that makes it harder for the primer to bond properly. I learned these lessons the hard way. Drywall sub finished a new construction house and we went in to do all the finish carpentry and flooring. We ran a salamander out in the garage for a month to keep us warm while we worked out there cutting wood flooring, tile and all the trim. After we were done the house took primer and paint just fine, but when the garage was primed it all bubbled up and peeled off the walls. So I never made that mistake again, electric heat only after the drywall is hung.

Interesting! I never knew that. When I built my place, I didn't have heat hooked up yet but the mudders needed to get rolling, and it was getting cold outside at that time of the year. Something that looked like a big metal canister was brought in and hooked to a propane tank outside of the building. Once the mudders finished, they'd fire up that canister and let an open flame burn overnight, making sure that temps were hot enough to keep the mud from freezing. Worked very well actually! I would have thought a salamander would do pretty much the same thing.