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rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

3 edits
reply to beachintech

Re: [Business] Main electric being changed to underground condui

So beach what does comcast do in your area if a house was built and only has conduit? I can see a inhouse tech refusing to do it but really comcast has construction and surely doesnt just abandon the conduit. Lets go one step further and say nothing was ever placed on a existing house. Its not like comcast can require a sub to run his own underground. FWIW Ive literly done thousands of underground pulls for comcast in no less than 12 different comcast systems. So it surely isnt the only one. Underground pulls pay by the foot. No way i walk away from that for a string which takes no more than ten minutes to suck thru.



NetFixer
From my cold dead hands
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
·Comcast

1 recommendation

reply to ski93

said by ski93:

Call Comcast and simply tell them you want to schedule a DROP WORK/ SRO (service request order) That costs you nothing...Not a relocate / re-install drop, they will charge 49.99 if you use those terms...If they ask why you need the drop replaced, make something up, like a tree came down on the drop and your services have been effected..Use your imagination...lol

This is a prime example of why so many service providers have an adversarial attitude toward their customers.

said by ski93:

When he arrives offer to help pull the cable through the pipe , this keeps the installer in a good mood and he wont change the order to a chargible call on you...

Of course, if you hadn't lied to him in the first place, the installer might not be in a bad mood.

said by ski93:

Let Comcast provide the coaxial cable, because they will use if they do it correctly armor plated or plenum underground cable...If coaxial drop is under 125 feet RG-6u will be fine...Anything over that urge the tech to use rg-11u just to make sure signal is not marginal...

Just what every tech loves...a customer who tries to tell him how to do his job.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.

rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA

Not to mention does anyone actually use armour plated cable anymore. Armour plated is crap and plenum WTF would you need plenum cable in conduit for? Do they even make underground plenum cable? Armour plated was for direct bury and sucks.



Wayne99021
Premium
join:2004-12-28
Mead, WA
kudos:1

My thought exactly about the plenum cable.
I have used miles of that stuff all in air return ceilings, but damn sure not in a conduit.



battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000
reply to jack b

From experience time and time again Comcast will probably do it with a little bitching. AT&T will cite some union rule and walk away.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.


Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1

It isn't a union rule that AT&T will cite, it is company policy.



battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

It's what ever it takes to get out of doing the job at hand... I had one 3 weeks ago that refused to pull fiber through a 40' conduit because it didn't have mule tape in the conduit. I've also had them refuse a pull because a ground was not in place yet. Our LATA has some (not all) techs that do what it takes to get out of work.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.


Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1

Just for your information, when the initial site visit is made with engineering and construction folks with the people that ordered the service, the customer is told that the pull string must be in place for the work to be completed.

You LATA has some technicians that are flirting with their jobs, or at least discipline. Should a supervisor catch them not following policy, they could get into trouble.

As for the ground, again that is covered on the initial (or should be) site visit. At least it was when I was the fiber equipment installation foreman. No ground, no installation.



battleop

join:2005-09-28
00000

I've done a few dozen metro E circuits this year and maybe 3 of them have been grounded when a ground was provided. Half the time the BIC Engineer will visit the site and completely ignore the notes that say to contact me or my office prior to the visit so we rarely get to meet with the BIC.
--
I do not, have not, and will not work for AT&T/Comcast/Verizon/Charter or similar sized company.



beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to rody_44

said by rody_44:

So beach what does comcast do in your area if a house was built and only has conduit? I can see a inhouse tech refusing to do it but really comcast has construction and surely doesnt just abandon the conduit. Lets go one step further and say nothing was ever placed on a existing house. Its not like comcast can require a sub to run his own underground. FWIW Ive literly done thousands of underground pulls for comcast in no less than 12 different comcast systems. So it surely isnt the only one. Underground pulls pay by the foot. No way i walk away from that for a string which takes no more than ten minutes to suck thru.

*Big note: You are a contractor correct? You have no idea what comcast's actual tech policies are.

The few we had where conduit was present, the builders were smart enough to leave strings / mule tape in there for us. Otherwise, we leave a temp on the ground and our contractor either burries it or uses the conduit, whatever they have time for.

My advice, leave a pull string. Tech's don't get time allotted on a new install or service call to be messing around with empty conduit.
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.


beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast
reply to ski93

said by ski93:

Once the conduit is buried and local inspector has approved it's installation, use your shop vac to suck through bailing twine or heavy duty string or rope..You never know what tech you will get on installation day, the guy who will be helpful or the guy who's a douche and won't do shit...So don't chance it...Call Comcast and simply tell them you want to schedule a DROP WORK/ SRO (service request order) That costs you nothing...Not a relocate / re-install drop, they will charge 49.99 if you use those terms...If they ask why you need the drop replaced, make something up, like a tree came down on the drop and your services have been effected..Use your imagination...lol
Push for a time frame and not an open ended order..That way you know it will not get pushed off by any tech that ends up with the job..When he arrives offer to help pull the cable through the pipe , this keeps the installer in a good mood and he wont change the order to a chargible call on you...
Let Comcast provide the coaxial cable, because they will use if they do it correctly armor plated or plenum underground cable...If coaxial drop is under 125 feet RG-6u will be fine...Anything over that urge the tech to use rg-11u just to make sure signal is not marginal...Every Comcast region is different when it comes to signal out of the tap at the street..You follow these steps and you will make the installation process smooth...Post your results let us all know how it goes...

125'+ rg-11?! lol. You must not work for comcast.
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.

rody_44
Premium
join:2004-02-20
Quakertown, PA
Reviews:
·Comcast

1 edit
reply to beachintech

yea im a contractor, You made it sound like it couldnt get done if the string wasnt there. I believe what you meant to say is the inhouse tech wouldnt do it. Contractors do it every day for comcast. I doubt the op gives a shit who does it just that it gets done.
Dont even work as a contractor anymore for comcast but still know lots of contractors that do and nothing has changed.



beachintech
There's sand in my tool bag
Premium
join:2008-01-06
kudos:5
Reviews:
·Comcast

said by rody_44:

yea im a contractor, You made it sound like it couldnt get done if the string wasnt there. I believe what you meant to say is the inhouse tech wouldnt do it. Contractors do it every day for comcast. I doubt the op gives a shit who does it just that it gets done.
Dont even work as a contractor anymore for comcast but still know lots of contractors that do and nothing has changed.

Our contractors would not do it either. They could make more money banging out drops with the ditch witch
--
Ex-Tech at the Beach.
I speak for myself, not my former employer.


WheatRidgeCO

@comcastbusiness.net
reply to pandora

New 400 amp conduit. The National Electrical code Completely prohibits this type of use. High Voltage, which is anything over 48 volts, CAN NOT co-exist with any type of low voltage cableing, inside the same conduit. That included COAX tv line. If your trench is still open, you can have the coax placed next to the other conduit, or place a new conduit for low voltage use so that
you can replace the line without digging up your yard in the future.
This has been the US Electrical code for a long time. Besides if you do place it inside the same conduit, you might degredade the signal with it being so close to the new electrical feed.



ropeguru
Premium
join:2001-01-25
Mechanicsville, VA

said by WheatRidgeCO :

New 400 amp conduit. The National Electrical code Completely prohibits this type of use. High Voltage, which is anything over 48 volts, CAN NOT co-exist with any type of low voltage cableing, inside the same conduit. That included COAX tv line. If your trench is still open, you can have the coax placed next to the other conduit, or place a new conduit for low voltage use so that
you can replace the line without digging up your yard in the future.
This has been the US Electrical code for a long time. Besides if you do place it inside the same conduit, you might degredade the signal with it being so close to the new electrical feed.

You need to go back and read this thread again and then correct your post.


NetFixer
From my cold dead hands
Premium
join:2004-06-24
The Boro
Reviews:
·Cingular Wireless
·Comcast Business..
·Vonage
·Comcast
reply to WheatRidgeCO

said by WheatRidgeCO :

New 400 amp conduit. The National Electrical code Completely prohibits this type of use. High Voltage, which is anything over 48 volts, CAN NOT co-exist with any type of low voltage cableing, inside the same conduit. That included COAX tv line. If your trench is still open, you can have the coax placed next to the other conduit, or place a new conduit for low voltage use so that
you can replace the line without digging up your yard in the future.
This has been the US Electrical code for a long time. Besides if you do place it inside the same conduit, you might degredade the signal with it being so close to the new electrical feed.

Is there some reason for your post other than that you just did not bother to read the thread before making it?

said by pandora :

Four conduit lines were run, 1 for the electric utility, a recommended spare for the electric utility (as it will be under an 85 foot long paved driveway) and 2 conduits, one for Comcast one for AT&T.


--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


IowaCowboy
Want to go back to Iowa
Premium
join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
Reviews:
·Verizon Broadban..
·Comcast
reply to pandora

When my underground drop went bad, they just pulled direct burial cable through the ground with an underground cable puller. There was conduit that housed both the Comcast and Verizon (landline) cable in the same conduit but they cut corners horribly and just pulled it around the back of the house.

I regret signing off on the job. The new line is vulnerable to damage from lawn equipment and I am thinking of pulling it out and enclosing it in PVC conduit.


pandora
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Outland
kudos:2
Reviews:
·ooma
·Google Voice
·Comcast
·Future Nine Corp..

said by IowaCowboy:

When my underground drop went bad, they just pulled direct burial cable through the ground with an underground cable puller. There was conduit that housed both the Comcast and Verizon (landline) cable in the same conduit but they cut corners horribly and just pulled it around the back of the house.

I regret signing off on the job. The new line is vulnerable to damage from lawn equipment and I am thinking of pulling it out and enclosing it in PVC conduit.

I have have 4 PVC conduits running from my telephone pole. 1 for AT&T, 1 for Comcast (1") and 2 3" conduits (a primary and spare, for 400 amp power. All are 24" underground and have some sort of magnetic wire that makes them easy to detect.
--
"If you put the federal government in charge of the Sahara Desert, in 5 years there'd be a shortage of sand." - Milton Friedman"

neufuse

join:2006-12-06
James Creek, PA
reply to beachintech

I actually this past summer had Comcast here in PA run a new line through existing conduit, they just pushed it through and it popped out at the other end with no troubles... it was the thicker QR320 line I think, the stuff that is like RG-11... they had no issues at all with using the conduit as long as it was orange... guess that was the only "code" issue they wanted to follow... grey PVC was a no, but orange was a sure