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Blackbird
Built for Speed
Premium
join:2005-01-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:3
Reviews:
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1 edit
reply to Corehhi

Re: WIN8 on new laptop=crap

As I watch the Win8 saga unfold, I'm struck by what I believe is a tactical error on the part of Microsoft, probably resulting from a strategic decision on their part. In order to drive user acceptance of a UI that integrates with MS's strategic plans for a single "user experience" across a broad range of device types, they have apparently designed and released a new OS that does not intentionally ease the transition in UI by having a single UI "choice" button right at the user's fingertips following bootup. Whether one can achieve such a "classic" UI via a path of multiple clicks and settings plus use of 3rd-party mods is irrelevant - it's not an inherent, "instant" part of the OS itself, and it's the OS that folks have just paid for, either directly or indirectly (as part of a new OEM system). It's the OS they will have to use daily for years to come.

Those users (and there are many, as reports clearly show) who simply want to use the next 'upgrade' version of an OS as a "tool" to be quickly put into use will be confounded by the very great clash in default user interfaces, and they will be put off by having to walk through anything but an immediate click that takes them to a UI that is familiar to them.

The tactical error made by MS was in not providing an obvious, simple means of achieving that. That it requires installing a third-party program to achieve a familiar UI experience makes it all appear worse - Microsoft was incapable of including a bit more code for the sake of such users, yet a third-party outfit had the code ready from the get-go? The effect on MS's "tool-oriented" user base has been the classic market response to such a glaring error: resist and resent... and the full effects of that have yet to play out in the marketplace, but I submit that they will be evident in dollars and cents before the dust finally settles on Win8. No user wants to be so clearly taken for granted, be overlooked, or be (in some articles) dissed away.

Users willing to accept the UI learning curve and the impacts on how actual work is accomplished seem to have few problems with Win8 (again, reports clearly show there are many such users). A lot of users who frequent these forums are in that class, so I expect that view to prevail around here. But Microsoft's business base lies with appealing to both kinds of users, and they have essentially now placed the one kind of user at arm's length... and that will have market impact - if only to significantly postpone some of their migrations to a new OS.

Ultimately, Win8 will gain market share, but its adoption by "tool-oriented" users will be impaired by what's occurred - especially by businesses where actual computing is done. At some point about 3 or 4 years hence, all the buzz will be about the upcoming new Win9. My guess is that by that time, Win9 versus Win8 will be very much akin to how Win7 is viewed versus Vista.
edit: clarity
--
“The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money.” A. de Tocqueville

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:6

1 edit
I called Dell at 4AM...no sleep because I was calling Employee Software Support Program in Round Rock, Tx which operates on CST M-F. I was directed to this dept by a Dell email responding to my request for a Reinstallation disk for Win 8 Pro. Instead of getting this program, I got hardware support in India (special queue for this higher end machine).

The tech tried to tell me I could not get a reinstallation disk! He also tried to tell me I have no downgrade rights from Microsoft even though I deliberately bought a Win 8 Pro system through Employee/Employer Purchase Program from Dell Small/Med Business Division so that I would have my Microsoft downgrade rights.

I got transferred to a supervisor who was pulled out of a meeting to talk to me (so I would not have to wait for him to call hours later as I need to get some sleep). I made it very clear to him that Dell should not be charging buyers of new Dell systems with Win 8 Pro up to $100 (in England) for the right to downgrade to Win 7 Pro as that is not what Microsoft has said. At least this is not what I read in Microsoft's statement about downgrade rights. If Microsoft has made a muddy statement then Dell should have corrected that statement on its website on the conigurator and made it crystal clear that it believes we have NO downgrade rights.

The supervisor is now speaking with his team and higher ups in Dell and will call me back in two hours (no sleep tonight for me). I told him that since Dell is ignoring their own forum where folks are asking for clarification on getting Win 8 reinstallation disks and asking how to exercise their downgrade rights if they bought a new computer with Win 8 pro that I plan to post what he tells me when he calls back on the Dell forum and other forums and thus he should make sure he has correct information before calling me back.

First the supervisor said I could downgrade to Win 7 Pro at no charge (but I had to get to a supervisor and push hard to get that concession) but he said I could never upgrade back to Win 8 Pro. I told him that I believed that stance was in violation of my Microsoft downgrade rights which state I can upgrade back to Win 8 Pro when I am ready (which I told him would be when Microsoft issues a service pack removing Metro from Desktop computers and makes it easier for me to do things like change the default Windows font).

It will be interesting what Dell decides. I told him the computer goes to back to Dell if I cannot get both a Win 8 Pro Reinstallation disk and an Win 7 Pro one at no charge (except a reasonable handling/shipping fee).

(I also explained to him that I would have bought this system back in May with Win 7 except I read the Dell forum thread about this system having non-functional PCI-e ports! I told him I kept waiting and waiting for Dell to acknowledge the problem and then say how they would fix it and on what time schedule. 250 posts in the thread and Dell finally issued a BIOS upgrade to fix it. This was the end of September and they were still shipping the system with the old BIOS in mid-October. So, by the time I was able to order this system with the upgraded bios and functional PCI-e ports Dell was putting Win 8 on it).
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson


sholling
Premium
join:2002-02-13
Hemet, CA
kudos:1

2 edits

1 recommendation

reply to Blackbird
said by Blackbird:

As I watch the Win8 saga unfold, I'm struck by what I believe is a tactical error on the part of Microsoft, probably resulting from a strategic decision on their part. In order to drive user acceptance of a UI that integrates with MS's strategic plans for a single "user experience" across a broad range of device types, they have apparently designed and released a new OS that does not intentionally ease the transition in UI by having a single UI "choice" button right at the user's fingertips following bootup. Whether one can achieve such a "classic" UI via a path of multiple clicks and settings plus use of 3rd-party mods is irrelevant - it's not an inherent, "instant" part of the OS itself, and it's the OS that folks have just paid for, either directly or indirectly (as part of a new OEM system). It's the OS they will have to use daily for years to come.

As you pointed out what you see in these food fights is a culture clash between those that those that just want to use a computer as a tool to accomplish tasks and those that want to see the operating system as a new toy to play with. What you left out is the fact that there is a group that will accept any MS dog food no matter how bad and remain devoted fanbois.

Darn few home or business users fall into the last two categories which is why Windows 8 will not see corporate adoption ever and why home PC sales are suffering. MS got arrogant again and are going to have a choice between providing an interface choice or accepting reduced sales.

BTW there have been free tools for opening ISOs in Windows 7 for years without having to deal with a very limiting phone interface on a desktop.

said by vaxvms:

Change is bad and serves no useful purpose. Never has. Never will.

Change to improve the user experience is good, change because you think you know better than your customers and want to stuff your ideas down their unwilling throats is stupid. Forcing MS Bob 2013 on customers was a stupid and arrogant business decision driven by an egomaniac at MS.

--
"Government is the great fiction, through which everybody endeavors to live at the expense of everybody else."
--FREDERIC BASTIAT--
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