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fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

Timing belt interval

On any vehicle that recommends 90k to 120k change of the timing belt, is it advisable to do it? Some people I talk to say yes, and some say they've never done it and have driven over 200k miles.

Not sure if this is a "should I change the oil at 3k miles" type of question, since 3k intervals are too small... usually.



Steve
I know your IP address
Consultant
join:2001-03-10
Foothill Ranch, CA
kudos:5

When answering this question one has to consider the penalty for error. Is yours an interference engine, or not? If it is, and your timing belt/chain breaks, it essentially destroys the engine.



Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2
reply to fartness

Are you talking about the timing chain, or the serpentine belt that drives the water pump, alternator, AC etc.?
--
I'm not anti-social, I just don't like stupid people.



Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to fartness

Yes, go with what Steve said. I had an old 1994 Escort with nearly 150,000 miles when I sold it. I believe the timing belt recommendation was at 90,000. I never did it. The engine was a non-interference engine, so I figured I would just take care of it if it ever broke.

If the car was an interference engine, I would certainly do it at regular recommended intervals. Don't gamble when a failure means destroying the engine. For those not familiar with the term, here's an explanation, along with a link to Gates guide to find out if your engine is an interference type. »www.freeasestudyguides.com/inter···ine.html


Bob4
Account deleted

join:2012-07-22
New Jersey
Reviews:
·Optimum Online
reply to fartness

Do you like playing Russian Roulette? Because not changing the timing belt when recommended is like playing Russian Roulette. You might win. You might lose. Feeling lucky, mister?

If the water pump is in with the timing belt, change it at the same time.



Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1
reply to fartness

Not only is it a issue of mileage but of time. I just did my Acura I was at 110k I didn't realize it was supposed to be done at 105k or 7 years! My car is a 2002. I was really pushing it, maybe I should but a lottery ticket.



fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to fartness

My example is a 2001 Ford Ranger 2.5L engine. I have 165k miles on it. Maybe the people who said don't bother said it because it seems to be a non-interference engine, meaning no harm would be done other than being late to wherever I was going.



lew_b
Premium
join:2003-05-11
Poughkeepsie, NY
reply to fartness

I was 2K miles over the 60K recommended change point on a Toyota I owned. Frigging belt decided to break when I was 70 miles away from home. A major PITA !!!
No engine damage but not very convenient.
Having the belt changed isn't cheap but it's like replacing your roof BEFORE it leaks.
--
Roadkill 2015



lew_b
Premium
join:2003-05-11
Poughkeepsie, NY
reply to Warzau

said by Warzau:

Not only is it a issue of mileage but of time. I just did my Acura I was at 110k I didn't realize it was supposed to be done at 105k or 7 years! My car is a 2002. I was really pushing it, maybe I should but a lottery ticket.

About this time thing ...
My current vehicle ('04 Lexus IS300) says to change the belt at 90K miles. I have about 85K on it now. Am I pushing my luck at 8 -9 years before changing ? Something tells me I am !
--
Roadkill 2015


Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4
reply to fartness

said by fartness:

My example is a 2001 Ford Ranger 2.5L engine. I have 165k miles on it. Maybe the people who said don't bother said it because it seems to be a non-interference engine, meaning no harm would be done other than being late to wherever I was going.

That is the only reason I said what I said. It should be done, yes. But if it isn't, on that truck the penalty would most likely only be the punishment you stated. If you have a critical schedule/job/etc, get it done.


Cho Baka
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join:2000-11-23
there
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Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
reply to fartness

Also consider the cost of a tow where you drive, depending on distance from home, an overnight hotel stay may also be required.

Some tows from elevated expressways and the like can be very expensive.
--
The talented hawk speaks French.



Vchat20
Landing is the REAL challenge
Premium
join:2003-09-16
Columbus, OH
reply to fartness

As already noted, the biggest thing to consider is if your car has an interference engine or not. To condense down the explanation: On an interference engine, the intake/exhaust valves and the cylinders will occupy the same physical space but not at the same time. This is where the timing belt comes in and keeps the timing of these components in check so they don't collide. If it breaks, there is a very great chance they will and would leave a VERY expensive repair. On a non-interference engine, these components will never occupy the same space so if the timing belt should break, worst case you are simply stranded and need towed back and just get the belt replaced and be on your way.

With that said, in both cases I would get it replaced at the manufacturer preferred intervals simply for preventative maintenance (in general these intervals are previously determined mileage points where the belts will BEGIN to wear out. While it could go on for much longer without breaking, it is chancing it and is cheaper to replace ahead of time), but a non-interference engine is a MUCH less costly repair should it be postpoined and break.

And as another prior post also mentioned: On many vehicles, the water pump is in the same cavity of the engine as the timing belt. Given the difficulty to get to that area, it is a very good idea to replace the water pump when doing the timing belt (once again, for preventative maintenance). The larger chunk of your bill is on the labor here so doing the job once for two parts ends up cheaper than going in twice for each.
--
I swear, some people should have pace-makers installed to free up the resources. Breathing and heart beat taxes their whole system, all of their brain cells wasted on life support.-two bit brains, and the second bit is wasted on parity! ~head_spaz



Doctor Olds
I Need A Remedy For What's Ailing Me.
Premium,VIP
join:2001-04-19
1970 442 W30
kudos:18

1 edit

1 recommendation

reply to Juggernaut

said by Juggernaut:

Are you talking about the timing chain, or the serpentine belt that drives the water pump, alternator, AC etc.?

Neither of those. Something a bit different.




--
What’s the point of owning a supercar if you can’t scare yourself stupid from time to time?


EGeezer
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Midwest
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reply to fartness

I'm scheduling a timing belt kit replacement this week. For whatever reason, the maintenance in the owner's manual recommended a timing belt at 90,000 miles if the car was used as a taxi, police vehicle or sat idling for extended periods of time. Otherwise, there was no mileage recommendation.

I didn't have the original belt changed until 215,000 miles (I must have been lucky!).

I now have 334,000 miles on the engine and believe the water pump is seeping a bit. I don't see fluid on the floor, but occasionally get a whiff of coolant when I raise the hood on a hot day when it's idling.

So, off to Eddie's this week for a timing belt kit and ancillary belts, hoses, filters and fluids.

Disclaimer: Your engine is different from mine, so I'd say follow the recommendations of previous posters who are more familiar with your engine.

I'd add that any belts, hoses, seals, fluids and filters that are encountered in the job be replaced with new stuff. No sense wasting labor, since those parts are much cheaper than the labor and hassle of replacing them, especially if they fail when you're out in the boonies.

I won't get into the oil change discussion. I know my policy works, and in the end everyone has different opinions which will never change.
--
Buckle Up. It makes it harder for the aliens to suck you out of your car.



Lurch77
Premium
join:2001-11-22
Oconto, WI
kudos:4

You're vehicle appears to have been well cared for. My work van, a 2001 Chevy, is creeping up on 285K now and is running very well. Since it is an important tool tool of my job, it is well cared for. I won't discuss the oil thing either, other than to say the interval is far wider than the old school 3000 standard.



Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
Premium
join:2006-09-05
Kelowna, BC
kudos:2
reply to Doctor Olds

Thanks Doc, I do know what they are.

I was asking him as he seems to be quite inexperienced about maintenance (see the oil overfill thread), so I wanted to make sure there was no misunderstanding on the subject before answering.
--
I'm not anti-social, I just don't like stupid people.



Warzau
Premium
join:2000-10-26
Naperville, IL
kudos:1
reply to lew_b

said by lew_b:

said by Warzau:

Not only is it a issue of mileage but of time. I just did my Acura I was at 110k I didn't realize it was supposed to be done at 105k or 7 years! My car is a 2002. I was really pushing it, maybe I should but a lottery ticket.

About this time thing ...
My current vehicle ('04 Lexus IS300) says to change the belt at 90K miles. I have about 85K on it now. Am I pushing my luck at 8 -9 years before changing ? Something tells me I am !

That I don't know. I would call a Lexus dealer and ask for if there is a time interval.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to fartness

»www.amazon.com/Goodyear-GTK0276-···tomotive

Is that ok to buy? 2001 Ford Ranger with a 2.5L engine.

How many hours of labor would a shop likely charge to do spark plugs? What about spark plug wires?



workablob

join:2004-06-09
Houston, TX
kudos:3
Reviews:
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reply to Lurch77

said by Lurch77:

Yes, go with what Steve said. I had an old 1994 Escort with nearly 150,000 miles when I sold it. I believe the timing belt recommendation was at 90,000. I never did it. The engine was a non-interference engine, so I figured I would just take care of it if it ever broke.

If the car was an interference engine, I would certainly do it at regular recommended intervals. Don't gamble when a failure means destroying the engine. For those not familiar with the term, here's an explanation, along with a link to Gates guide to find out if your engine is an interference type. »www.freeasestudyguides.com/inter···ine.html

+1

I had a 1995 and 1996 escort that both went over 100K and I never replaced the timing belt/chain.

Dave
--
I may have been born yesterday. But it wasn't at night.


cdru
Go Colts
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join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to fartness

said by fartness:

»www.amazon.com/Goodyear-GTK0276-···tomotive

Is that ok to buy? 2001 Ford Ranger with a 2.5L engine.

I can't comment specifically on that belt for your application. But I've used teh Gatorback belts in the past and have been very happy with them.

How many hours of labor would a shop likely charge to do spark plugs? What about spark plug wires?

Judging from pictures of the engine, it should be under an hour for both if they really drag their feet. The plugs look readily accessible without having do work around other components much, and the wires are even more accessible.


bobjohnson
Premium
join:2007-02-03
Orlando, FL
reply to workablob

I had a 1997 Acura Integra 4cyl with 280k miles on it... Replaced everything but the timing belt... That said, I would recommend replacing the timing kit in the intervals with any interference engine... I have seen some bad things happen.



fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to fartness

Does that link I posted have everything that should be replaced with it? Are there any other parts?

What about thermostat while work is being done in that area?



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by fartness:

Does that link I posted have everything that should be replaced with it? Are there any other parts

What link?

What about thermostat while work is being done in that area?

My rule of thumb is replace anything that will cost less to replace now then it would cost to replace it later redoing the labor required to get there.


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside

Go up two posts of mine.



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by fartness:

Go up two posts of mine.

Ah. I thought you had posted a repair guide or a list of items that needed replaced. Not just the amazon link. Based on the diagrams above, what's in that picture should be the only items presuming nothing is broken, worn, etc. The only other thing that might need to be is the spring for the tensioner which looks to be a separate item. Not sure if that is a item that weakens over time and should be replaced with the tensioner.
Expand your moderator at work


fartness
computersoc dot com
Premium
join:2003-03-25
Look Outside
reply to fartness

Re: Timing belt interval

Is this a good water pump?
»www.amazon.com/Bosch-97159-New-W···to_img_y



cdru
Go Colts
Premium,MVM
join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7

said by fartness:

Is this a good water pump?
»www.amazon.com/Bosch-97159-New-W···to_img_y

I've used a variety of after market water pumps over the years for all sorts of different makes of vehicles. I've never had one that didn't work as intended. Unless you have something exotic, or there's a manufacturing defect, they're all going to be about the same.

So in other words, it's likely as good as any other water pump.