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HOWboutTHAT

@videotron.ca

Canadian Climate change due to a tiny beetle

Destructive beetle altered climate of Canada by one degree
»www.business-standard.com/genera···e/84096/

Funny or what?

Just says infestation. Not sure if this is an foreign species introduced to the country by whatever means.

Nor does it state what it's predators are.

Nor does it state the name of the species.

Sheez, what a terrible article. It tells you nothing except that the sky is falling.

K, just found this one, which answers some of the missing info
»phys.org/news/2012-11-bitsy-beet···ada.html

It's a native species.



Thane_Bitter
Inquire within
Premium
join:2005-01-20

I am shocked they did not write "wood-cum-beetles" anywhere in the article.



vue666
Small block Chevys never die
Premium
join:2007-12-07
Halifax, NS
kudos:1

But....but...but... I thought man was to blame? LOL



cascade soap

@videotron.ca

I think they say that the small shift towards warmer weather caused a cascading effect. In other words, the small amount of warmer weather in turn caused this beetle to flourish which in turn drives the weather up even more.

I may have beech front property within my life time yet!


Mountain pine beetle is a native species, but climate change (warmer winters) has resulted in a population explosion and this beetle has been devastating western North American pine forests. It is an increasingly common example of a native species that has become invasive due to climate change. It is marching eastward and could eventually devastate pine forests across the continent.



FaxCap

join:2002-05-25
Surrey, BC
Reviews:
·Shaw
reply to HOWboutTHAT

And not just the pine forests. We have been bombarded by news
media stories back here in BC for years now. The scariest of those
stories was one saying there is some evidence the beetle can and
has jumped species. When faced with no pine close enough to
survive they can and will burrow into other species of trees.

Here is one I just found
»genomealberta.ca/blogs/mountain-···ies.aspx

FaxCap