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pcolasteve

join:2012-05-12

[Other] Configurable Modems (Cable / DSL)

Why is it so hard to find a consumer grade cable or dsl modem that is completely configurable? I am not talking to the extent of a Cisco T1 csu/dsu, but one that a person can set the routing protocol and such?

I have only found one DSL that meets this requirement, and that is the Motorola/Netopia 3347 and nothing in the cable modem category.

Does anyone have a list of configurable devices or as to why they are so hard to find?

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4
said by pcolasteve:

Why is it so hard to find a consumer grade cable or dsl modem that is completely configurable? I am not talking to the extent of a Cisco T1 csu/dsu, but one that a person can set the routing protocol and such?

I have only found one DSL that meets this requirement, and that is the Motorola/Netopia 3347 and nothing in the cable modem category.

Does anyone have a list of configurable devices or as to why they are so hard to find?

what exactly are you wanting to configure in a cable modem? aside from the obvious...

Bink
Villains... knock off all that evil

join:2006-05-14
Castle Rock, CO
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to pcolasteve
Because over 99 percent of consumers do not need or know what a routing protocol is.

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

1 recommendation

said by Bink:

Because over 99 percent of consumers do not need or know what a routing protocol is.

+1

but the biggest reason I believe is signal theft / hacking...

pcolasteve

join:2012-05-12
reply to medbuyer
I have two separate networks with two separate WAN IPs. In each network the modem, (DSL or Cable) is used as the csu/dsu giving access to the WAN. Attached to those are Cisco routers. The commercial, consumer grade modem will not communicate with the router allowing access to the WAN because the routing protocols are different. This is what I am talking about.

Bink
Villains... knock off all that evil

join:2006-05-14
Castle Rock, CO
kudos:4

2 recommendations

Treat the modems as dumb layer two devices and have the Cisco handle the routing. This is fairly common.

medbuyer

join:2003-11-20
kudos:4

1 recommendation

said by Bink:

Treat the modems as dumb layer two devices and have the Cisco handle the routing. This is fairly common.

+1

simple yet effective and straightforward...

pcolasteve

join:2012-05-12
reply to Bink
Thought of that / tried that. Per my ISP the network won't "register," what ever they mean by that. They say that this process is not workable with a residential account. (My guess is that they just want more money.)

In any case I have the problem resolved with a modem that is configurable for what I needed.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9

2 recommendations

reply to pcolasteve

The commercial, consumer grade modem will not communicate with the router allowing access to the WAN because the routing protocols are different.

There aren't any "routing protocols" involved. PPPoE or DHCP is typically used to provide the IP address, netmask, and gateway. This isn't routing. What you want is a pure bridge device (DSL or cable.) However, even then, your (lame) ISP(s) may lock access to a specific MAC -- something US cable operators used to do until they grew a clue (can you say "significant administrative overhead") This is why many consumer routers have a "MAC Cloning" feature. (Cisco routers have always had this "feature"... you can set the MAC of an ethernet interface.)

hardly
Premium
join:2004-02-10
USA
reply to pcolasteve
PM me if a Cisco 678 still in unopened antistatic shrink, trips your trigger.


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to pcolasteve
Because the ISP does NOT want to deal with issues when the customer has screwed up the modem.

"Customer - I didn't do anything to the modem".

Tech goes out on call -

Result

Customers screwed up the modem.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
Premium
join:2002-05-21
Burlington, WV
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
said by CylonRed:

Because the ISP does NOT want to deal with issues when the customer has screwed up the modem.

"Customer - I didn't do anything to the modem".

Tech goes out on call -

Result

Customers screwed up the modem.

I have seen it in just the reverse.

"Customers complains to ISP about persistent network issues."

"ISP dispatches technician, after several months of reporting issues, who also cannot establish a solid connections."

"Tech provides customers new modems to satisfy network engineers."

"Replacement modems continues to have problems."

"Network engineers mystified - problems found at CO which resolve a couple issues. But problem continues and the resolution cut back speed until problem stops. Because the network is severely oversold."

Therefore it is reported as customers caused issue, but the ISP didn't have any issues. Note: Customers is plural.


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County

2 recommendations

No one said it could not happen in the reverse. With the DSL I have had for years I have found it painfully easy to determine if the problem is me or outside my control - ISP/CO/ILEC etc... and that can be determined by the CSR when a customer calls (at least for most people).
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
Premium
join:2002-05-21
Burlington, WV
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..
That was understood. I was simply showing that ISP's are not prefect, nor are their technicians and customers are not always the cause (as stated in your response). I am happy the CSR's you deal with can make that determination, I wish our CSR's were a competent. Yes, it is painfully easy to determine if the problem is me or outside my control. But to our ISP the customer is almost always considered considered irrelevant.


NormanS
I gave her time to steal my mind away
Premium,MVM
join:2001-02-14
San Jose, CA
kudos:12
Reviews:
·SONIC.NET
·Pacific Bell - SBC
reply to pcolasteve
said by pcolasteve:

I have two separate networks with two separate WAN IPs. In each network the modem, (DSL or Cable) is used as the csu/dsu giving access to the WAN. Attached to those are Cisco routers. The commercial, consumer grade modem will not communicate with the router allowing access to the WAN because the routing protocols are different. This is what I am talking about.

For cable, the signal rides on coax between the CMTS and the modem. Signaling is, I believe, based on DOCSIS standards. The modem bridges the coax (HFC) signaling and the Ethernet link. What is there to configure?

For DSL, the signal rides on a copper pair between the DSLAM and the modem. Signaling is based on ADSL, ADSL2+, VDSL, or VDSL2 standards. Most modems auto-detect the virtual circuit pair, and about the only user configuration deals with authentication; PPPoA, PPPoE, or none (DHCP).

With a pure modem, bridging is possible; but the damned RGs ISPs are issuing these days don't seem to bridge well, if at all. I have a Pace 4111N which fails to connect in bridge mode. The last pure DSL modem I found is no longer in production.
--
Norman
~Oh Lord, why have you come
~To Konnyu, with the Lion and the Drum

HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to pcolasteve
I seem to recall reading somewhere that the DOCSIS 3.0 standard disallows end-user configuration. My Motorola SB6141 allows me to view the status, but not make changes to it.

Cable ISP's typically link the MAC address of the cable modem to their equipment. If you want to put the cable modem into bridge mode, you have to get the ISP's tech people involved. They can put the modem into bridge mode and then link their equipment to the MAC of the router you attach to the Ethernet port of the cable modem. If you change the router, you have to call them and go through the process again. You may find that they will only do this for business accounts though, depending on the ISP. I've only done it for customers on a business class connection, with a static IP.

Here at the house, I have my routers WAN port set to get an address from the cable modem via DHCP. The cable co. has the MAC of my cable modem linked to their stuff and I can swap out my router without getting their tech folks involved. (Because their equipment doesn't care what's on the Ethernet port of the modem).

I don't follow the statement about "routing protocols being different" . Routing takes place inside the router. The only thing going out the WAN port is Ethernet frames.

cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:9
said by HarryH3:

I seem to recall reading somewhere that the DOCSIS 3.0 standard disallows end-user configuration.

What? The CABLE side is not, and has never been, user configurable. There's nothing in the DOCSIS configuration a user needs to touch.

Cable ISP's typically link the MAC address of the cable modem to their equipment.

As I've said, US cable operators stopped doing this a long time ago as it was an unnecessary administrative headache. The HFC MAC, i.e. the network identity of the modem, is what's set in their system. That's how they identify an authorized modem, and link it to an account. What the user hangs off of it is not tracked by the ISP -- it will be temporarily tracked by the modem to enforce CPE limits (eg. one connected device) (a reboot will forget it)