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EUS
Kill cancer
Premium
join:2002-09-10
canada
Reviews:
·voip.ms
reply to Jaxom

Re: This ought to be interesting...

said by Jaxom:

The new Canada...brought to you by the Harper Government and the Conservative Party of Canada. "We sell out to any corporation" is their motto.

We need only watch the USA for what is coming next. 6 strikes law on the internet?

How soon you forget. This BS dates back to long before the cons came to power.
We have run out of leaders, all we have left are USA yes men.
Dig our sovereign nation begging to get accepted to tpp (which will encompass more US-centric IP laws), promising/signing anything in return for the unknown. An unknown that cannot be negotiated/renegotiated once revealed.
All behind closed doors.
I love our open democracy, at least I think I do, it's been a while since I've seen it in action.
--
~ Project Hope ~


davidl

join:2008-07-11
Vaudreuil-Dorion, QC
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
said by EUS:

said by Jaxom:

The new Canada...brought to you by the Harper Government and the Conservative Party of Canada. "We sell out to any corporation" is their motto.

We need only watch the USA for what is coming next. 6 strikes law on the internet?

How soon you forget. This BS dates back to long before the cons came to power.
We have run out of leaders, all we have left are USA yes men.
Dig our sovereign nation begging to get accepted to tpp (which will encompass more US-centric IP laws), promising/signing anything in return for the unknown. An unknown that cannot be negotiated/renegotiated once revealed.
All behind closed doors.
I love our open democracy, at least I think I do, it's been a while since I've seen it in action.

Kind of like what the Democrats did with the Obama Health Care law: "You have to vote for it before you find out what's in it"...we should sever ties with the United States before they sink like the Titanic.

I at least hope that Teksavvy is honourable enough to give us a heads up if some outside force is trying to get them to hand over our data. Better yet, the logs should be destroyed at the end of every day as a matter of course.


Tx
bronx cheers from cheap seats
Premium
join:2008-11-19
Mississauga, ON
kudos:12
Reviews:
·TekSavvy DSL
·FreePhoneLine
·Rogers Hi-Speed
said by davidl:

said by EUS:

said by Jaxom:

The new Canada...brought to you by the Harper Government and the Conservative Party of Canada. "We sell out to any corporation" is their motto.

We need only watch the USA for what is coming next. 6 strikes law on the internet?

How soon you forget. This BS dates back to long before the cons came to power.
We have run out of leaders, all we have left are USA yes men.
Dig our sovereign nation begging to get accepted to tpp (which will encompass more US-centric IP laws), promising/signing anything in return for the unknown. An unknown that cannot be negotiated/renegotiated once revealed.
All behind closed doors.
I love our open democracy, at least I think I do, it's been a while since I've seen it in action.

Kind of like what the Democrats did with the Obama Health Care law: "You have to vote for it before you find out what's in it"...we should sever ties with the United States before they sink like the Titanic.

I at least hope that Teksavvy is honourable enough to give us a heads up if some outside force is trying to get them to hand over our data. Better yet, the logs should be destroyed at the end of every day as a matter of course.

I believe Marc was just talking about it on another thread. By-Law they must keep logs for x amount of days


davidl

join:2008-07-11
Vaudreuil-Dorion, QC
Well, what's to stop anyone from just editing a txt log file and putting in your IP address...

- Search 192.160.0.xxx
- Replace 192.168.0.yyy
- Save
- Exit

...he's *guiltayyyyyyy*...pay up sucka!

chalkdastick8

join:2007-04-27
Montreal, QC
reply to Tx
Dr. Michael Geist, a respected law professor at the University of Ottawa says:
Over the past couple of days, there have been multiple reports about the return of file sharing lawsuits to Canada, with fears that thousands of Canadians could be targeted. While it is possible that many will receive demand letters, it is important to note that recent changes to Canadian copyright law limit liability in non-commercial cases to a maximum of $5,000 for all infringement claims. In fact, it is likely that a court would award far less - perhaps as little as $100 - if the case went to court as even the government's FAQ on the recent copyright reform bill provided assurances that Canadians "will not face disproportionate penalties for minor infringements of copyright by distinguishing between commercial and non-commercial infringement"
www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/6710/125/)


drjp81

join:2006-01-09
canada

1 recommendation

reply to JonyBelGeul
said by JonyBelGeul:

Burden of proof. Canadian law. Innocent until proven guilty. An IP address is not enough to prosecute. The person must be identified, while doing the deed. Nobody in Canada is stupid enough to testify against friends and family for essentially a victim-less crime. Without actual witness account of the person doing the downloading of copyright content without permission, the person accused of such merely needs to declare "I did not do it" to be declared innocent, for the charges to be dropped.

In fact, even if an IP is enough to investigate, if the accused still claims innocence, evidence gathered during investigation is still not enough, if there is no direct witness of that person doing the deed. I personally had such an experience with a hit-and-run, where I was a witness to it, and gave my testimony, with license plate and everything. The investigation even included a recreation, where the owner was asked to bring the car, examine the paint marks, the shape of the indentation in both vehicles, etc. It all matched. However, the entire investigation rested on a single very specific item: My visual identification of the person doing the deed. It so happened that the person who owned the car was not the person driving it at the time. When I was presented with a photo layout of 6 possible suspects, I could not identify the owner, because he just wasn't the one driving the car at the time of the incident. How could I identify a person whom I've never seen before, let alone absent during the incident? The charges were dropped. Ironically, the owner of the car was a lawyer student. He certainly knew about burden of proof.

If that's how it works for hit-and-runs where there is actual real physical damage, imagine how little legal resources the Canadian courts are willing to put toward prosecuting victim-less crimes like copyright infringement.

"I did not do it"

+1
IPV6 ALREADY!
--
Cheers!