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ILpt4U
Premium
join:2006-11-12
Lisle, IL
kudos:9
Reviews:
·AT&T U-Verse
reply to Webbie

Re: Thinking of switching from WOW to AT&T

Depending on what speed internet package, and which overall bandwidth profile you are on (sounds like you would be on the 32/5 overall bandwidth profile, as 4 HD and Max 24 internet are available), HD stream usage can affect internet speed

For example, if you do get Max 24 internet, and are using all 4 HD streams: You have a maximum of 32 Mbps for the entire service. IPTV has higher bandwidth priority than internet. Each HD stream uses ~5.7 Mbps. 4x5.7=22.8. 32-22.8=9.2. So basically, all 4 HD streams in use uses 22.8 Mbps. Take that away from 32 Mbps, that leaves 9.2 Mbps for Internet.

Also, keep in mind that there is a 4 Stream total limit of live, independent IPTV streams available. If you have 7 different TVs, that is something to keep in mind. Those 4 streams are for watching live and/or recording.

For example, you are recording 2 shows. That uses 2 streams. Another TV is watching another show. That is stream 3. Another TV is watching a 4th show. That is stream 4. At this point, the only things available for any other TVs would be any of those 4 streams presently in use, or anything already recorded. There is no access to a 5th (or beyond) live stream of IPTV

Also, you can only record 3 HD streams at any given time (the 4th stream can be recorded in SD). A 4th HD stream can be watched on any receiver OTHER than the DVR



Webbie

@webermarking.com

Interesting.....I guess it would be a good idea to figure out if we ever REALLY have more than 4 TV's going at the same time, huh?

Thanks for response,

Webbie


TBBroadband

join:2012-10-26
Fremont, OH
reply to ILpt4U

If you have voice with U-Verse that subtracts more bandwidth correct?



techguyga
Premium
join:2003-12-31
Cumming, GA

Yes, but not appreciably. Voice streams are pretty small. A G.711 law encoded stream (same as POTS) uses a 64kbps stream, (8 kHz sampling frequency x 8 bits per sample).