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hm

@videotron.ca
reply to DKS

Re: ok a strange topic: Dissolving Grandma. Part Deux

said by DKS:

The contract is simply a monetary deposit. Preferences are indicated, such as range of price of services, but because prices of services can change over the years, no specific services are contracted. Interest is paid on the money deposited and it accumulates with the deposit. The deposits are insured in Ontario. Such contracts can also be transferred without penalty, usually.

Yeah, prices change. But in some instances and it's all contract dependent, and prov dependent, in many situations there is a guarantee of what is covered and guaranteed not to change.

For example, costs of the viewing, cost of cremation, cost of the vessal (coffin or vase).

In one situation I was in everything was covered, except for (and this is the technical term they used), "The opening and closing ceremony", which cost me ~1,000$.

That is where they dig the hole and then fill it in.

Guess union work isn't covered.


hm

@videotron.ca
said by hm :

In one situation I was in everything was covered, except for (and this is the technical term they used), "The opening and closing ceremony", which cost me ~1,000$.

That is where they dig the hole and then fill it in.

Guess union work isn't covered.

OH!
I guess in regards to this topic the question must be asked!

Will there be a flushing ceremony cost?


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to hm
said by hm :

said by DKS:

The contract is simply a monetary deposit. Preferences are indicated, such as range of price of services, but because prices of services can change over the years, no specific services are contracted. Interest is paid on the money deposited and it accumulates with the deposit. The deposits are insured in Ontario. Such contracts can also be transferred without penalty, usually.

Yeah, prices change. But in some instances and it's all contract dependent, and prov dependent, in many situations there is a guarantee of what is covered and guaranteed not to change.

For example, costs of the viewing, cost of cremation, cost of the vessal (coffin or vase).

In one situation I was in everything was covered, except for (and this is the technical term they used), "The opening and closing ceremony", which cost me ~1,000$.

That is where they dig the hole and then fill it in.

Guess union work isn't covered.

Cemetery costs are normally separate from the funeral. That is because in many parts of Canada, funeral homes are not allowed to own cemeteries. And not all cemeteries are unionized.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to hm
said by hm :

said by hm :

In one situation I was in everything was covered, except for (and this is the technical term they used), "The opening and closing ceremony", which cost me ~1,000$.

That is where they dig the hole and then fill it in.

Guess union work isn't covered.

OH!
I guess in regards to this topic the question must be asked!

Will there be a flushing ceremony cost?

The industry will figure out a way to charge for that. And someone will come up with a ritual of flushing.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


hm

@videotron.ca
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

Cemetery costs are normally separate from the funeral. That is because in many parts of Canada, funeral homes are not allowed to own cemeteries. And not all cemeteries are unionized.

We went through this in another topic. See reference in the first post of this topic. To re-iterate what was said in that other topic, not applicable here. Maybe in Ontario...


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

And someone will come up with a ritual of flushing.

The thought of that kind of makes me feel sick in the pit of my stomach, but hey, whatever floats one's boat I guess.


u betcha

@videotron.ca
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

The industry will figure out a way to charge for that. And someone will come up with a ritual of flushing.

Blessing of the plunger ceremony, $1,000


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to hm
said by hm :

said by DKS:

Cemetery costs are normally separate from the funeral. That is because in many parts of Canada, funeral homes are not allowed to own cemeteries. And not all cemeteries are unionized.

We went through this in another topic. See reference in the first post of this topic. To re-iterate what was said in that other topic, not applicable here. Maybe in Ontario...

And Quebec isn't the centre of the universe.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

said by Ian:

said by jaberi:

Ian, or anyone ...... how long after death is the will open to be settled?..what's the probate thing mean?

I'm no expert, but I think it's wildly dependent on the complexity of the estate and whether or not anything is contested or not.

For example, if your estate is 100% cash, quickly. If its a web of complex securities and real estate partnerships over 6 continents, years.

Again, you are sadly mistaken. Having been the executor of a simple estate, it took ten months to settle it. The most difficult part was dealing with the CRA. Two final tax returns have to be filed; the tax return for the year of death and once the Notice of Assessment has been received, the Final return has to be filed. The CRA can take months to clear a Final return (my CA says allow 5-6 months).

Jeebus, some of you guys just like to argue. OK smart guy, 10 months is "quickly" to me. Am I still "sadly mistaken"?
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong

MaynardKrebs
Heave Steve, for the good of the country
Premium
join:2009-06-17
kudos:4
reply to Curious me
A lot of bodies probably ought to be disposed of as hazardous waste, particularly those people who died while being treated for cancer with carboplatin and other industrial strength anti-cancer agents. There's way too much pharmaceutical active ingredients leeching into the environment.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to Ian
said by Ian:

Jeebus, some of you guys just like to argue. OK smart guy, 10 months is "quickly" to me. Am I still "sadly mistaken"?

Dude, he deals with these matters as part of his career. What do you expect, him to sit around while people who know nothing about this talk as if they do?


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
said by Gone:

said by Ian:

Jeebus, some of you guys just like to argue. OK smart guy, 10 months is "quickly" to me. Am I still "sadly mistaken"?

Dude, he deals with these matters as part of his career. What do you expect, him to sit around while people who know nothing about this talk as if they do?

If what I said was "wrong" then fine. All I said was that depending on complexity it could be from "quickly" to years. And that still isn't wrong by anything he posted. He replied just to be argumentative...Kinda like.... Oh yeah. You.
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to Ian
said by Ian:

Jeebus, some of you guys just like to argue. OK smart guy, 10 months is "quickly" to me. Am I still "sadly mistaken"?

You didn't give any frame of reference. If 10 months is "quickly" to you, so be it. If you feel 5-6 months to approve the final return for a simple estate is acceptable, fine.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to Ian
said by Ian:

If what I said was "wrong" then fine. All I said was that depending on complexity it could be from "quickly" to years. And that still isn't wrong by anything he posted. He replied just to be argumentative...Kinda like.... Oh yeah. You.

If you hadn't been such an asshole about claiming that my knowledge was "deficient" on what is legally binding in a will when the only one with a deficiency of understanding on this topic was you, I wouldn't be so keen on rubbing it in every chance you give me.


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

said by Ian:

Jeebus, some of you guys just like to argue. OK smart guy, 10 months is "quickly" to me. Am I still "sadly mistaken"?

You didn't give any frame of reference. If 10 months is "quickly" to you, so be it. If you feel 5-6 months to approve the final return for a simple estate is acceptable, fine.

Thus no frame of reference to describe as "sadly mistaken". I don't know what's involved for the CRA to approve a final return, thus no basis to decide if 5-6 months is "acceptable" or not. And as with absolutely EVERYTHING that the Government does, they don't tend to consult me (or you I'd wager) on setting time-frames.
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong


Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

said by Ian:

If what I said was "wrong" then fine. All I said was that depending on complexity it could be from "quickly" to years. And that still isn't wrong by anything he posted. He replied just to be argumentative...Kinda like.... Oh yeah. You.

If you hadn't been such an asshole about claiming that my knowledge was "deficient" on what is legally binding in a will when the only one with a deficiency of understanding on this topic was you, I wouldn't be so keen on rubbing it in every chance you give me.

Uh huh. Trying to get another topic locked?
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
said by Ian:

Uh huh. Trying to get another topic locked?

... and yet you continue with an air of non-culpability despite comments like that? Figures.


true dat

@videotron.ca
reply to MaynardKrebs
said by MaynardKrebs:

A lot of bodies probably ought to be disposed of as hazardous waste, particularly those people who died while being treated for cancer with carboplatin and other industrial strength anti-cancer agents. There's way too much pharmaceutical active ingredients leeching into the environment.

You aren't wrong.

jaberi

join:2010-08-13
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

said by Ian:

said by jaberi:

Ian, or anyone ...... how long after death is the will open to be settled?..what's the probate thing mean?

I'm no expert, but I think it's wildly dependent on the complexity of the estate and whether or not anything is contested or not.

For example, if your estate is 100% cash, quickly. If its a web of complex securities and real estate partnerships over 6 continents, years.

Again, you are sadly mistaken. Having been the executor of a simple estate, it took ten months to settle it. The most difficult part was dealing with the CRA. Two final tax returns have to be filed; the tax return for the year of death and once the Notice of Assessment has been received, the Final return has to be filed. The CRA can take months to clear a Final return (my CA says allow 5-6 months).

DKS can every member of the family have a right to informally request to see the will, or obtain a copy of the will?...before/after death.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
said by jaberi:

can every member of the family have a right to informally request to see the will, or obtain a copy of the will?...before/after death.

Informally? No.


shrug

@videotron.ca
reply to jaberi
you can ask the person about it while their alive. Ask to see if they have a copy etc.

jaberi

join:2010-08-13
too late...guess the only way to do it then ask an attorney to ask for it, if it can't be done informally.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to true dat
said by true dat :

said by MaynardKrebs:

A lot of bodies probably ought to be disposed of as hazardous waste, particularly those people who died while being treated for cancer with carboplatin and other industrial strength anti-cancer agents. There's way too much pharmaceutical active ingredients leeching into the environment.

You aren't wrong.

I could ask (may take a few days) but I believe that some embalming waste is disposed of as biohazard material.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to jaberi
said by jaberi:

DKS can every member of the family have a right to informally request to see the will, or obtain a copy of the will?...before/after death.

I have no idea, but I doubt it. Not unless the person shows it to you.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to shrug
said by shrug :

you can ask the person about it while their alive. Ask to see if they have a copy etc.

You can ask them, but they're not legally bound to show it to you. After they pass away the executor isn't legally bound to show it to you either, but you can apply to the court to have a copy provided to you.