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jaykaykay
4 Ever Young
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join:2000-04-13
USA
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1 edit

1 recommendation

A follow up for all!

Click for full size
downloadID Theft0001.pdf 1,314,595 bytes
This is a follow up to my prior post reminding everyone of the problems with credit cards and ID theft. This is an article from a recent Consumer Reports which directly correlates with my prior thread on credit card theft.


StuartMW
Who Is John Galt?
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join:2000-08-06
Galt's Gulch
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1 recommendation

Good article (and I agree with it 100%). Thanks.

I'll chip in when Consumer Reports sues you for posting a copyrighted article
--
Don't feed trolls--it only makes them grow!



Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
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reply to jaykaykay

Isn't the gist of the article that the threat is greatly exaggerated, and points out (as other online sources did) that your liability in a credit card theft is, at most $50 (usually waived)?



jaykaykay
4 Ever Young
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join:2000-04-13
USA
kudos:24

Not really, IMO. I think the gist of the article is to do what you can to protect your ID, but don't go to large expenditures to do it as it's not necessary to spend lots of money on some things that you can do without cash.



Dude111
An Awesome Dude
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join:2003-08-04
USA
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reply to StuartMW

 

A good article!!!!

said by StuartMW :
I'll chip in when Consumer Reports sues you for posting a copyrighted article
Ah man!!


Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
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join:2002-05-21
Burlington, WV
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When I try to open the pdf I receive error that the file is damaged and cannot be repaired.



Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3

said by Hank:

When I try to open the pdf I receive error that the file is damaged and cannot be repaired.

Suspect the issue is with your reader, and not the file itself. Loads fine for me with Foxit Reader 5.3.1.
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong


Dude111
An Awesome Dude
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join:2003-08-04
USA
kudos:12
reply to Hank

Yes the file opens fine for me on Abode 3 so it should work ON ALL NEWER VERSIONS!!



Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
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join:2002-05-21
Burlington, WV
kudos:2

Don't think so, I just went back; it downloaded and opened just fine. But maybe one of those phantom issues that we have with our ISP.



Rebrider
Been There Done That
Premium
join:2000-11-23

1 recommendation

reply to jaykaykay

Re: A follow up for all!

said by jaykaykay:

Not really, IMO. I think the gist of the article is to do what you can to protect your ID, but don't go to large expenditures to do it as it's not necessary to spend lots of money on some things that you can do without cash.

The most effective you can do is to put a security freeze on your credit report at all three reporting agencies. In most states it is free to do so. It is not often that there is a need for your credit to be checked. When you do need it you can temporarily lift the freeze.

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
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1 recommendation

That's right, but if I had done that I could not have walked out of the dealer with my new car last Christmas. Plus, you have to pay to put the freeze on. It is not free at all. Lifting the freeze is not free either and can't be done spur of the moment. I think it is worthless except to someone who has been notified of theft of their credit card information.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson



Hank
Searching for a new Frontier
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Burlington, WV
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Frontier Communi..

I placed a Fraud Alert on my credit report. The reason I did that was because I have someone using my name and address. This way I receive notices if someone tries to purchase something in my name. It did not cost me anything to place the Fraud Alert with the credit bureaus.


dave
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join:2000-05-04
not in ohio
kudos:8
reply to Ian

Not merely the gist, but explicitly stated in the second section.



Rebrider
Been There Done That
Premium
join:2000-11-23
reply to Mele20

said by Mele20:

That's right, but if I had done that I could not have walked out of the dealer with my new car last Christmas. Plus, you have to pay to put the freeze on. It is not free at all. Lifting the freeze is not free either and can't be done spur of the moment. I think it is worthless except to someone who has been notified of theft of their credit card information.

Sorry to bust your bubble, but you don't know what your are talking about.
I put a security freeze on our reports. There was no charge. I can go online and temporarily lift the freeze again no charge. I can even call from a business and lift the freeze for the reporting agency they use. Again no charge.
In SC there is no charge for this. Some states do allow the credit reporting agencies to charge you a fee.
If you live in a state that does not have a fee then why not do it.


sivran
Opera ex-pat
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Irving, TX
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1 recommendation

Obviously Hawaii does allow a charge.


Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5
reply to Rebrider

Oh, and how would I go online, at 9PM on Friday evening so it is like 2-3AM on the Mainland, when my computer is at my home (it is a desktop) and change that so it was effective INSTANTLY? (The dealer had trouble getting information from any credit agency at that hour. This is why Sears credit does not close on the Mainland until 10PM HST but I don't think the three credit agencies give a rats ass about Hawaii time zone... they are horrible anyway). So, I could NOT have walked out with my new car.

Besides, UNLESS YOU ARE A VICTIM OF IDENTITY FRAUD OR CREDIT CARD THEFT with a police report, you must pay to put those alerts on and pay to take them off.

Besides, if you do this then you never get new credit offers ...not just cards but loan offers, etc. I think it is a good idea if you are a bona fide victim of identity theft or your credit card has been stolen (physically or from a data base and the bank notified you about it). What would be better though is for the stupid banks to stop plastering your credit card number all over statements (and do as Discover does). I just asked a local bank to stop doing that and they said they did it so, when someone's card was lost or stolen, that customer was told to look up the card number on their statements so the bank could issue a new card!!! My reply to that was that the customer should keep a list of all cards, expiration dates and three digit code in their safety deposit box.
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson



Ian
Premium
join:2002-06-18
ON
kudos:3

said by Mele20:

...that customer was told to look up the card number on their statements so the bank could issue a new card!!! My reply to that was that the customer should keep a list of all cards, expiration dates and three digit code in their safety deposit box.

Sounds to me like the bank was operating with prudent measures to verify the identity of the caller. Perhaps the numbers shouldn't be plastered in the bills, sure, but how practical is it to have a customer service agent go open a physical vault to get that information?

And for that matter, how secure is it for any customer service call centre monkey to have the keys to said vault?

And why is someone getting paper bills in the first place in 2012?
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong


CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County
reply to sivran

said by sivran:

Obviously Hawaii does allow a charge.

Yep - depends on the state on how much, if anything, it costs.

However - even if the costs are marginal - it is still the single best thing to do bar none. It is not remotely useless as Mele thinks.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain

Mele20
Premium
join:2001-06-05
Hilo, HI
kudos:5

1 recommendation

reply to Ian

Gee...I guess you don't have a safety deposit box. Why would someone at the bank open YOUR box? That is illegal and they cannot as their master key works only when your key is also present. What I meant was that you would need to go down to the bank during business hours and open your box and get the card number and then get a new card issued. If that is too much trouble, then keep a record of the numbers hidden somewhere in your home or in a password protected file on your computer, etc. They shouldn't be on your statements. Besides, the last four digits of the acct number and your Soc Sec number and password are sufficient when you call the bank about a lost/stolen card for the bank to properly identify you and your card. (The banks that have removed the card number from statements keep the last four digits on the statement). You should also call from the same phone number you used to activate the card. If you have more than one phone number then add the others to your account.

I get ALL my statements in the mail. This particular bank and the other main Hawaii bank (best bank in the nation three years running according to Forbes) don't even ask if you want to do away with paper statements...although I would assume you could do it if you wanted to do so. I want to get statements in the mail because it is a major hassle to try and verify every charge on a computer screen if there are more than a very few since the last statement. Plus, why should I have to pay for ink and paper to print out the statement each month?

To see the computer screen clearly, I have to close the blackout drape on the lanai double floor to ceiling glass doors. That means I can't see the credit slips to check them against what I see on the screen because the desk is then dark and using a lamp washes out the monitor screen almost as much as does the sunlight from the glass doors if I don't close the drapes. Then there is the fact the banks will automatically log you out after a VERY FEW MINUTES. You would have to keep logging back in, and getting in your account repeatedly, to check maybe 50-100 charges each month? If you only use a card for an occasional large purchase then paperless would work...but then what do you do if you decide to use that card for everything? It makes more sense to get paper bills. Plus, what if your computer is on the blink and you can't access your account and have no paper statement?
--
When governments fear people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. Thomas Jefferson



CylonRed
Premium,MVM
join:2000-07-06
Bloom County

1 recommendation

reply to Ian

quote:
And why is someone getting paper bills in the first place in 2012?
Far, far, far easier to keep track of bills... At least for me.
--
Brian

"It drops into your stomach like a Abrams's tank.... driven by Rosanne Barr..." A. Bourdain


Juggernaut
Irreverent or irrelevant?
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Kelowna, BC
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Yep, and no sec risks like PDF readers either.



Dude111
An Awesome Dude
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USA
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reply to CylonRed

 

And stuff is MORE PRIVATE if you use cash!! (No records anywhere)



Ian
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ON
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reply to CylonRed

Re: A follow up for all!

said by CylonRed:

quote:
And why is someone getting paper bills in the first place in 2012?
Far, far, far easier to keep track of bills... At least for me.

For some. For me, it was just a big honkin; stack of paper that should either be locked away or shredded immediately in any case as an identity theft risk. Dumpster diving is an old (and effective) tool in identity theft. I'm a lot better at managing data than I am paper. Seems a lot easier to me to search my inbox from my bank by date than a stack of papers or a file cabinet. And can check my e-mail from anywhere. Which isn't to say that anyone ought to be reviewing their CC statements from the Public Library PC without some considerations as to security.
--
“Any claim that the root of a problem is simple should be treated the same as a claim that the root of a problem is Bigfoot. Simplicity and Bigfoot are found in the real world with about the same frequency.” – David Wong