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brianmcd
Premium
join:2000-09-06
Norristown, PA
reply to fbruno

Re: Using a 17.0Ah battery on FiOS battery backup

I would think that it would be even easier to just plug the ONT into a UPS. You can make the UPS as large as you need and it will take care of maintaining its battery. So your ONT Battery should only kick in when the external UPS has run out of juice.


birdfeedr
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-11
Warwick, RI
kudos:9
Easy, yes. Efficient, no.

When on battery, my ONT draws 10 watts. When the battery is charged, the BBU PS uses 20 watts just to maintain. That's the FiOS equipment. Now add the losses to run and maintain the second UPS.

I'm not disagreeing with your solution, but there's another one (or two or three).

*My* real solution is to use a backup generator to run lots of stuff in my house in the event of a power outage. The experiment with the battery is mostly to expand the list of options.

If I knew a particular battery solution would give me 36 hours of runtime, I can compare it to other solutions that would provide the same. How do I specify a UPS that would give me 30 hours of runtime with a 20W AC load?

BKE

join:2008-01-01
Leesburg, VA


birdfeedr
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-11
Warwick, RI
kudos:9
Yowza. SMX750 at $429.00, plus at least one additional SMX48RMBP2U battery at $455.00 (Amazon pricing). For that kind of money, I can put up a solar array, PV controller plus battery and take it off the grid.

Only for a SFU with clear shot to the sky.

One more option on the list.


aaronwt
Premium
join:2004-11-07
Woodbridge, VA
reply to birdfeedr
said by birdfeedr:

Easy, yes. Efficient, no.

When on battery, my ONT draws 10 watts. When the battery is charged, the BBU PS uses 20 watts just to maintain. That's the FiOS equipment. Now add the losses to run and maintain the second UPS.

I'm not disagreeing with your solution, but there's another one (or two or three).

*My* real solution is to use a backup generator to run lots of stuff in my house in the event of a power outage. The experiment with the battery is mostly to expand the list of options.

If I knew a particular battery solution would give me 36 hours of runtime, I can compare it to other solutions that would provide the same. How do I specify a UPS that would give me 30 hours of runtime with a 20W AC load?

Running the UPS is minimal cost in the real world. I get 16 to 18 hours of runtime before my ONT has to use it's own BBU. I use a dozen of the APC 1500XS/Back UPs Pro 1500 models with extended runtime batteries for my electronic devices. The extra power use of the UPSs is extremely minimal.

fbruno

join:2000-04-06
Berwyn, PA
Reviews:
·VOIPO
·Verizon FiOS
reply to birdfeedr
Click for full size
I can only tell you what I know for experience. The attached picture shows the UPS equipment I use to power an ONT, Cisco ASA firewall, NAS device, and wireless access point. (The reason for my original question was to maintain POTS service at my Dad's house.)

When all batteries are installed and healthy, the equipment provides close to 60 hours of backup power. Currently, only the UPS and one external enclosure are populated with batteries, (they get expensive!) Last month, it easily provided 24 hours of power for the ONT and firewall, and access point (I shut down the NAS to conserve power.)

The entire setup is overkill in some respect, as the equipment was originally used in several corporate distribution closets. We used to change the UPS equipment every three years, at the same time when our company refreshed the network switches. They ceased that process when the true costs became evident, (travel, planning, wiring, consultants.)