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HarryH3
Premium
join:2005-02-21
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Suddenlink
reply to pcolasteve

Re: [Other] Configurable Modems (Cable / DSL)

I seem to recall reading somewhere that the DOCSIS 3.0 standard disallows end-user configuration. My Motorola SB6141 allows me to view the status, but not make changes to it.

Cable ISP's typically link the MAC address of the cable modem to their equipment. If you want to put the cable modem into bridge mode, you have to get the ISP's tech people involved. They can put the modem into bridge mode and then link their equipment to the MAC of the router you attach to the Ethernet port of the cable modem. If you change the router, you have to call them and go through the process again. You may find that they will only do this for business accounts though, depending on the ISP. I've only done it for customers on a business class connection, with a static IP.

Here at the house, I have my routers WAN port set to get an address from the cable modem via DHCP. The cable co. has the MAC of my cable modem linked to their stuff and I can swap out my router without getting their tech folks involved. (Because their equipment doesn't care what's on the Ethernet port of the modem).

I don't follow the statement about "routing protocols being different" . Routing takes place inside the router. The only thing going out the WAN port is Ethernet frames.


cramer
Premium
join:2007-04-10
Raleigh, NC
kudos:8

said by HarryH3:

I seem to recall reading somewhere that the DOCSIS 3.0 standard disallows end-user configuration.

What? The CABLE side is not, and has never been, user configurable. There's nothing in the DOCSIS configuration a user needs to touch.

Cable ISP's typically link the MAC address of the cable modem to their equipment.

As I've said, US cable operators stopped doing this a long time ago as it was an unnecessary administrative headache. The HFC MAC, i.e. the network identity of the modem, is what's set in their system. That's how they identify an authorized modem, and link it to an account. What the user hangs off of it is not tracked by the ISP -- it will be temporarily tracked by the modem to enforce CPE limits (eg. one connected device) (a reboot will forget it)