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matcarl
Premium
join:2007-03-09
Franklin Square, NY

Verizon to use cameras/microphones to monitor us for ads?

What is this? Verizon will watch us to see what we are doing and give us ads based on what we are doing like cuddling with someone?

»www.fiercecable.com/story/verizo···12-11-30



Onedollar

join:2001-08-27
Pomona, CA
kudos:6

1 recommendation

Skynet

Dont you like to cuddle Mat?



danclan

join:2005-11-01
Midlothian, VA

Yeah i just don't see this going in anywhere in the real world....Consumer advocates and homeowners everywhere would be screaming bloody murder due to the potential privacy implications.

It's a product that sounded better in a marketers head than when placed on paper.



matcarl
Premium
join:2007-03-09
Franklin Square, NY

No one would allow this in their homes. Having people listened to and watched? Looking at the ages of our children and how people are dressed and if they are having an argument or a romantic encounter? Please! Big Brother really has arrived.



jjoshua
Premium
join:2001-06-01
Scotch Plains, NJ
kudos:3
reply to matcarl

No need to get upset over a patent application.


billhere

join:2011-10-21
Santa Monica, CA

It's the start of a slippery slope. I'd go back to my rooftop antenna if Verizon ever implemented such a feature.


JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4
reply to matcarl

I think everyone needs to take a breath here. First, as jjoshua said, it's just a patent application. Lots of patents are applied for that lead nowhere. Second, while I find such a set-up creepy, and would never go for it, this is something that can only be done if you volunteer for it. If you sign up for it. Third, this isn't 1984 - even if it was fully implemented. There's a distinction between a company doing something like this... and the government. If the government were the ones rolling this out, then yes, I'd be up in arms. But private companies can't force you to do squat. The worst that will happen is that they would make it part of their terms of service, at which point you could... terminate your service with said company. No muss, no fuss. Verizon has no more ability to compel you to take such a service as I do. Government CAN compel you do do stuff. Companies can't.

Finally, can't anyone see why someone wouldn't want such a service? I could. If I had an elderly relative living alone, having the ability to monitor them is something that I would find useful. Especially if they set it up as such a service. Everyone is also assuming that, even if they were to roll this out, there would be no controls over it. Why is that the baseline assumption? I can disable all sorts of functionality from my set top boxes today. Why couldn't I disable such a feature at specific times if I so desired?


texastown

join:2008-04-25
Plano, TX
reply to matcarl

It's a joint effort by all the cable companies. This is beyond creepy, really strange behavior. Who is running these companies?



More Fiber
Premium,MVM
join:2005-09-26
West Chester, PA
kudos:30

1 recommendation

reply to matcarl

So how many of you that are up in arms about this have an Xbox Kinect, which can do essentially the same thing?. MS has applied for a similar patent.
»www.businessinsider.com/microsof···-2012-11
--
There are 10 kinds of people in the world; those who understand binary and those who don't.



bohratom
Jersey Shore is back again.

join:2011-07-07
Red Bank NJ
reply to matcarl

The biggest companies watching us and taking information is GOOGLE AND FACEBOOK, and the best part is people are signing up to give it to them...


JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4

1 recommendation

reply to matcarl

The question you have to ask yourself is - what can these companies do with such information even if they were allowed to get it? The answer: target you with advertizing. Not exactly Ministry of Information type stuff. Again, companies have no authority to make you do squat. You are a willing participant and you can walk away. I guess I'm not sure I understand why everyone is so up in arms over this. They've implemented nothing so far, and there's a good chance that nothing ever will be implemented. They're applying for patents IN THE EVENT A SYSTEM GETS DEVELOPED. It gives them the intellectual property rights ON THE METHOD EMPLOYED. That's it. They've done research in this, and the patent basically ensures that their company will be seen as being the originator of that particular method of employing the technology.

All other aspects of it - from acceptance by consumers, to what these companies will be allowed to do legally, are all just conjecture at this part. The absolute worst that these companies can do is to sell your data to other companies. And if you have concerns about it then DON'T SIGN UP FOR IT. The idea that a company will be able to force such a feature on you unwillingly is just ludicrous. Even if they could, there are lots of enterprising ways to get around it - but they won't be able to. I could understand the gnashing of teeth if the government were doing this, but these are private companies. They don't have a police force or military that can make you do stuff against your will. They seek to make a profit and they do it by selling you stuff that you actually want or need. If you, as a company, engage in activity that is seen as being reprehensible, then the market will punish you more than any law ever could. Companies have gone under for less than this.


Mac973

join:2009-05-18
West Orange, NJ
reply to matcarl

People sign up for Facebook and voluntarily offer every detail of their life to the world on there. This really isn't that much different.


texastown

join:2008-04-25
Plano, TX

I disagree that this is the same as Facebook and Google, as obnoxious as their behavior is as well. This is something inside our homes, on all the time. You say they will need permission, how many times have companies "needed permission" but "accidently" activated things without the necessary permission.

All these various invasions of privacy are wrong. Adding another large eye on us isn't a positive, so defending it with other examples of the behavior isn't a defense, it's an excuse for invading our lives and it's wrong.


JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4

said by texastown:

I disagree that this is the same as Facebook and Google, as obnoxious as their behavior is as well. This is something inside our homes, on all the time. You say they will need permission, how many times have companies "needed permission" but "accidently" activated things without the necessary permission.

All these various invasions of privacy are wrong. Adding another large eye on us isn't a positive, so defending it with other examples of the behavior isn't a defense, it's an excuse for invading our lives and it's wrong.

And what would happen if a company accidentally activated such a feature? What could they do with the information? Target you with ads. Again, look at the ramifications of such a move. If the government were to do that, that would be one thing - they could target you for real, but a company doing such a thing would have what power over you?

Besides, if a company is neglegent and 'accidentally' turns on such a feature as a matter of course, you have a recourse. You can sue them.

This reminds me of how up in arms people got when they found out that TiVo was storing up their DVRing behavior (came as a surprise to alot of people to find out that that wardrobe malfunction was, until that time, the most rewound thing that TiVo ever recorded, which got many to ask: what do you mean they're monitoring what I'm doing with my DVR). Did the TiVo storm-troopers come into the houses of the afflicted, forcing them to do anything? Of course not. Companies have no authority over you to do anything. Yes, they can make your life miserable in some respect if they're particularly negligent, but again as a consumer, as a citizen, you have recourse against that. These companies don't make money by creeping people out. They make money by providing you with a good or service you want or need. That's it. It's a mutual arrangement. And as with any such arrangement, when one side doesn't like the deal, they're free to walk away.

texastown

join:2008-04-25
Plano, TX

JPL, you write well and are often an apologist for corporate conduct, whatever that may be at the moment.

You may be comfortable with the continuously escalating invasion of our privacy by corporations and the government. That is your privilege.

I find it both intrusive and as it spreads and gets more accepted, disturbing.

Believe that no one will use any of this information for anything other than ads if it makes you comfortable. The truth is, it will be used as the "collectors" want. Whatever that may be, and I don't like it.


JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4

said by texastown:

JPL, you write well and are often an apologist for corporate conduct, whatever that may be at the moment.

You may be comfortable with the continuously escalating invasion of our privacy by corporations and the government. That is your privilege.

I find it both intrusive and as it spreads and gets more accepted, disturbing.

Believe that no one will use any of this information for anything other than ads if it makes you comfortable. The truth is, it will be used as the "collectors" want. Whatever that may be, and I don't like it.

You're misreading part of what I wrote. I don't like invasion by the government - as I was abundantly clear about in my postings. Because government can engage in coersive behavior. What's more they have things like militaries and law enforcement that can take away your liberty. Private companies are a different entity altogether. The are private entities that are treated, per the law, as individuals. You have recourse against them. The data that they gather could be used for no purpose directed against you. What in the world could Verizon do if they did take a picture of you sleeping on the couch? It's on par with having your neighbor look in your window. Yeah, it's creepy, but if I found my neighbor doing that, without my permission, I would have recourse. Same thing with a company like Verizon.

I'm not being a corporate apologist. I just think way too many people attribute things to companies that aren't based in reality. Companies aren't angels... but they're not devils either. Sometimes some step over the line... just like individuals do. And when they do, you have legal recourse against them. Especially if they were acting with intent.

I guess I don't understand the gnashing of teeth over a system that doesn't even exist. You're engaging in wild conjecture on what such a system could/would entail - but such a system doesn't even exist.

And if such a system were created, and you were really that concerned about what Verizon was engaging in, then drop them. That's what I mean by all of this. With the government, you have no choice. You can't just pick a new government if you don't like what this one is doing. But with a private enterprise, you get to decide whether you do business with them or not. You make it sound like Verizon will send their goons into your house, and force you to sign up for their service.

Mac973

join:2009-05-18
West Orange, NJ
reply to matcarl

Obviously a system like this would require a camera and microphone. Get a piece of duct tape, cover up the camera and microphone, and call it a day. Or just point the camera out the window and let it watch your neighbors


Acct101
Premium
join:2011-09-20
Bensalem, PA
reply to matcarl

If this ever happened, I would run away from cable so fast, I'd be tripping over my feet.


batsona
Maryland

join:2004-04-17
Ellicott City, MD
Reviews:
·Vonage
·Verizon FiOS
reply to matcarl

Sure would be nice if I were halfway interested in the commercials... I counted 12 commercials in a program I was watching once. Then it comes back for 4 mins, then another 12 commercial. --Kinda makes TV pointless...

I don't wanna watch the patent commercial where the pitchman says, "The guy who invented the kids slip-n-slide was successful. Most inventions are not successful...."

This is why TV will migrate to the Internet (where ad dollars are plentiful...) As fewer and fewer viewers 'remain behind' for network TV & cable, there will be less ad revenue, which means MORE commercials. "television" will go the way of the newspaper...

When will networks cut out the middleman, and sell services for $$ directly to the consumer? If I like a few shows on NBC, I'll sign up with NBC.COM & log in & watch the shows. Likewise with the Discovery Channel, to watch Mythbusters. The networks will get their subscription revenues directly from consumers who subscribe to their services.

Lastly, I'm selfish! At 10PM when the days' work is done, kids are in bed, and the dishes are done, I lay down and watch TV. I easily fall asleep between the 1st and last commercial~!



TweakerInWA
Optimus
Premium
join:2001-12-11
Las Vegas, NV
reply to matcarl

I kinda like the idea of someone watching me..... Ohh the stories they could tell, I would be a legend !!!!
--
Smoke'm if ya got'em !!!


Mac973

join:2009-05-18
West Orange, NJ
reply to batsona

said by batsona:

When will networks cut out the middleman, and sell services for $$ directly to the consumer? If I like a few shows on NBC, I'll sign up with NBC.COM & log in & watch the shows. Likewise with the Discovery Channel, to watch Mythbusters. The networks will get their subscription revenues directly from consumers who subscribe to their services.

The problem is, they are not likely to get enough customers to subscribe online, and therefore not make as much money as they do now. It's the same principle as why a-la-carte tv won't work. The networks make money from the cable companies by requiring carriage fees for ALL customers (at least for most channels). They get paid whether a person watches the channel or not. That's not going to work online.

jophan
Premium
join:2009-07-12
Jenkintown, PA
reply to matcarl

What bugs me is all of these patents filed for wild ideas that haven't been implemented. Didn't a patent once have to actually reflect a working thing? [/fogey]



Proginoskes
Space
Premium
join:2001-08-11
Asbury Park, NJ
reply to matcarl

Someone watching me watching tv? I know just where to put the piece of tape.


PJL

join:2008-07-24
Long Beach, CA
kudos:2
reply to matcarl

This thread cracks me up....


JMikeF

join:2005-05-05
Alexandria, VA

Don't laugh. The chip in the brain - required by the government - is a decade away.


JPL
Premium
join:2007-04-04
Downingtown, PA
kudos:4

said by JMikeF:

Don't laugh. The chip in the brain - required by the government - is a decade away.

Yeah, but maybe on the good side, they'll team up with Verizon, and they'll allow you to stream directly to that chip. No STB required!

skohly

join:2009-08-19
Township Of Washington, NJ
reply to PJL

said by PJL:

This thread cracks me up....

Yup!!! Imagine the possiblities of what we could Verizon?

skohly

join:2009-08-19
Township Of Washington, NJ

I meant to say Imagine the possiblities of what we could show Verizon.

Expand your moderator at work

tnsprin

join:2003-07-23
Bradenton, FL
kudos:1
Reviews:
·Verizon FiOS
reply to bohratom

Re: Verizon to use cameras/microphones to monitor us for ads?

said by bohratom:

The biggest companies watching us and taking information is GOOGLE AND FACEBOOK, and the best part is people are signing up to give it to them...

Google you can at least use there tools to NOT accept targeted ads. For now keeping my google owned companies separate (YouTube, Zagat, etc). You see my Facebook, NOPE not signed up and never intend to. Same for Google+, etc. Bad enough I have to use some sites and want to use some others.