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sfogliatelle
We Is Whut We Am
Premium
join:2002-05-29
Baton Rouge, LA
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drilling into brick/mortar

I'd like to attach some hooks and hangers to the exterior of a car port that's bricked, but don't think my aged, homeowner grade 8V Black & Decker cordless drill is going to be of much help, even with carbide and/or diamond tips. The holes needed should be about 3/8 inches in diameter. Have read differing opinions on drilling into the mortar vs. the bricks.

Am thinking of renting a hammer drill but besides some basic safety items like glasses and a mask I don't know what else I'd need for the job, like adhesives and such.

Any suggestions?

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
Could you give some more details on the hooks and hangers you want to install as well as what they are intended to support.


nunya
LXI 483
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O Fallon, MO
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reply to sfogliatelle
You can get a hammer drill at Harbor Freight for $20. Beats renting. It won't be a quality drill by any means, but should get you through one job. Any extra time is a bonus.

Always drill the brick, not the mortar.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
said by nunya:

Always drill the brick, not the mortar.

Drill the mortor, not the brick!


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
reply to sfogliatelle
Splurge on a basic 80$ DeWalt hammer drill.
It doubles as a normal drill AND electric screw driver.

kherr
Premium
join:2000-09-04
Collinsville, IL
Is that a battery or corded??


sfogliatelle
We Is Whut We Am
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join:2002-05-29
Baton Rouge, LA
Reviews:
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reply to robbin

Assorted Storage Hooks_1

Assorted Storage Hooks_3
said by robbin:

Could you give some more details on the hooks and hangers you want to install as well as what they are intended to support.

Attached are sorta kinda what I've been thinking of anchoring into either the bricks or mortar.

The heaviest item to be hung is an aluminum extension ladder. Right now it's being temporarily suspended by two bungee cords. I'd like to be able to put some light-duty shelves up against one of the brick walls. Nothing too terribly heavy; the last thing I want is to cause any instability on the outer walls.

Given what was mentioned, what would you suggest as the best way to keep the hooks in? Liquid Nails? Anchors?


jack b
Gone Fishing
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join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1
reply to sfogliatelle
said by sfogliatelle:

besides some basic safety items like glasses and a mask
Any suggestions?

Hammer drills can be pretty loud, in addition to goggles and dust mask, use some hearing protection. You don't need expensive ear muffs, inexpensive throwaway foam earplugs work fine for short-term use.
--
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cdru
Go Colts
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join:2003-05-14
Fort Wayne, IN
kudos:7
reply to robbin
said by robbin:

said by nunya:

Always drill the brick, not the mortar.

Drill the mortor, not the brick!

Didn't we already have this fight in another thread? It's like deja vu all over again.

robbin
Premium,MVM
join:2000-09-21
Leander, TX
kudos:1
reply to sfogliatelle
said by sfogliatelle:

Given what was mentioned, what would you suggest as the best way to keep the hooks in? Liquid Nails? Anchors?

I always use epoxy. You can get the little double syringe (maybe 5 oz) which does a number of holes at the big box specifically made for concrete -- it works well. Tape and mask the area off and use a little stick to work the epoxy back in the hole and those storage hooks will be solid for a very long time. Similarly, use short pieces of all thread for larger hooks. Make sure that you buy good hooks so you don't have to replace them. The way things work these days nothing is ever the same and you don't want to drill more holes over time if it is not necessary.

If you are only drilling a few holes in the mortar then a new carbide bit in a regular drill is all you need. Blow them out with a compressor, can of air, etc and you will have a much better bond.


nunya
LXI 483
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join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
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reply to sfogliatelle
Do it the right way and mount them in the brick. Mortar will crumble and become loose.
Use lag shields for the bike hooks.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


sfogliatelle
We Is Whut We Am
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join:2002-05-29
Baton Rouge, LA
Reviews:
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reply to robbin
Good tips. Thanks, robbin See Profile.

It's true and a shame what you said about how things work these days and their frustratingly inconsistent quality.


sfogliatelle
We Is Whut We Am
Premium
join:2002-05-29
Baton Rouge, LA
reply to jack b
Good call, jack b See Profile. I'd read about the noise level of hammer drills. Will get some disposable earplugs.


alkizmo

join:2007-06-25
Pierrefonds, QC
kudos:1
said by sfogliatelle:

Good call, jack b See Profile. I'd read about the noise level of hammer drills. Will get some disposable earplugs.

Never underestimate the noise of a hammer drill.

One time I was using it in my backyard while there was a baseball game going on in the park behind my house.

I hit something hollow with my hammer drill while using a hole saw bit. The noise caused was extremely loud and echoed in the air. The baseball game spectators stopped cheering/clapping for a couple of seconds. Good thing I wasn't actually visible from the park. God.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
reply to sfogliatelle
I just drilled some bricks this Summer to install some of those hooks. All I used was a normal drill with a masonry bit. No issues at all drilling into the bricks. After that I tossed some anchors in the holes then attached the hooks. I can't see spending extra money on a tool for a single task unless it's a major task. Just to drill 6-10 holes a normal drill is fine unless you want a hammer drill for something else.
--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!


Inssomniak
The Glitch
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join:2005-04-06
Cayuga, ON
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reply to nunya
said by nunya:

Do it the right way and mount them in the brick. Mortar will crumble and become loose.
Use lag shields for the bike hooks.

+++++11

Never use mortar.
I drill into brick every day, to hang wireless equipment, NEVER use the mortar.

Heavy stuff I use those anchors that have a sleeve that expands when you tighten it into the brick. They will hold a house up.
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Inssomniak
The Glitch
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Cayuga, ON
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reply to Draiman
said by Draiman:

I just drilled some bricks this Summer to install some of those hooks. All I used was a normal drill with a masonry bit. No issues at all drilling into the bricks.

For softer bricks this is fine, regular drill will do it, just takes a bit longer.

But for poured concrete or very hard bricks, this does not work
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Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC

1 edit
said by Inssomniak:

said by Draiman:

I just drilled some bricks this Summer to install some of those hooks. All I used was a normal drill with a masonry bit. No issues at all drilling into the bricks.

For softer bricks this is fine, regular drill will do it, just takes a bit longer.

But for poured concrete or very hard bricks, this does not work

What did they do before hammer drills were invented? Like lots of things a specialty tool make life easier but isn't required. There's a ton of ways to skin a cat.

--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!

Austinloop

join:2001-08-19
Austin, TX
kudos:1
reply to Inssomniak
said by Inssomniak:

said by Draiman:

For softer bricks this is fine, regular drill will do it, just takes a bit longer.

But for poured concrete or very hard bricks, this does not work

My techs have used hammer drills for a number of years to set relay racks and battery stands. I introduced my son to hammer drills when it was necessary to anchor a gun safe in his garage. We tried the concrete bit with a regular drill, didn't go any where after several minutes. Rented a hammer drill and job was done in about 3 minutes. Hammer drills are the way to go.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
reply to sfogliatelle
Like anything else you have to know how to use a masonry bit with a normal drill to make it work. You can't just pull the trigger and push the drill. You need to simulate the hammer action that is automatic in hammer drill but you can accomplish the same task with either it's just speed. A hammer drill will do it in a minute and a normal drill will do it in 2-3 minutes. Also a cheap masonry bit won't do it you need a good carbide-tipped masonry bit.

"If using a standard drill, pull the drill out and back in every ten seconds. This acts as a hammer to get a bite on the concrete.
If progress is slow, you hit an aggregate. Insert a masonry nail, hit with hammer to break the aggregate."

It's crazy how we forget how this stuff was done before the newest tool was invented. I do the same thing with an impact driver.
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IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!


nunya
LXI 483
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O Fallon, MO
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reply to Draiman
Before hammer drills, we used a star drill. Austinloop will know exactly what I'm talking about.
Ma Bell was even "nice" enough to buy us handles for them.
--
If someone refers to herself / himself as a "guru", they probably aren't.


Inssomniak
The Glitch
Premium
join:2005-04-06
Cayuga, ON
kudos:2
^^^ This

I have one of these in the toolbox.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
reply to sfogliatelle
The $5 solution is great nunya.


nunya
LXI 483
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join:2000-12-23
O Fallon, MO
kudos:13
I'd spend the $20 at Harbor Freight. Star drills are a PITA.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
reply to sfogliatelle
It depends. It's a 30-45 minute drive each way so a 60-90 minute drive round trip for me. I could have the entire job done cheaper and faster. Different strokes for different folks. That's what these forums are all about. Getting different view points on a single topic.
--
IF YOU FIND ANY MISTAKES IN MY WORK...Please consider that they are there for a purpose. I try to please everyone and there is always someone looking for mistakes!


sfogliatelle
We Is Whut We Am
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join:2002-05-29
Baton Rouge, LA
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reply to nunya
said by nunya:

I'd spend the $20 at Harbor Freight.

HF does have 'em for a pube under $20. Just my luck if I go that route and finish this job I probably wouldn't have additional need for it until day 93---right after their warranty expires!

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Reviews:
·Callcentric
reply to sfogliatelle
Click for full size
I usually drill into the mortar joints, but I've never hung anything really heavy from brick. I do think it depends on the bricks, though. The type with the holes may not support much if the expansion fitting was installed right into the hole, you would only have the narrow bit of brick holding up the load. In this case I'd think the mortar would provide more strength.

If dealing with a solid brick I'd expect drilling into the brick, as opposed to the mortar joint, would give better support.


sfogliatelle
We Is Whut We Am
Premium
join:2002-05-29
Baton Rouge, LA
Hadn't given that any consideration, garys_2k See Profile. I have no earthly idea which type of brick is on that carport.


jack b
Gone Fishing
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join:2000-09-08
Cape Cod
kudos:1

1 recommendation

It's probably hollow unless it's old, the lower "brick" (above) is a paver.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
reply to sfogliatelle
The bricks on my house are solid but it was built in 1960. Those were some tough bricks!