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Arthur Dent

join:2011-01-27
Calgary, AB
reply to Foggy

Re: [BC] TELUS High Speed Turbo 25 Usage being reduced 50%

Those defending Telus this time should just shut up. In countries with real competition the 50 Mbps service costs 6-7 times less and has no bandwidth cap.
What we are seeing is collusion at its best. All these regulations that allowed Telus, Shaw, Bell and Rogers to be Dominant Internet providers are the reason why we have insanely expensive and ridiculously limited Internet service in Canada. We are turning into the laughing stock of the world.

Kruisey

join:2006-12-30
Vancouver, BC
Your thinking is incorrect.
Look at the size of the UK against Canada 62,641,000 population
In Canada a huge country compared to them only 34,482,779
Then there is USA 311,591,917 again country smaller then Canada.
Far more people.
Which equals many more customers .Guess whats next?
Makes for LOWER PRICING..

lightspeedpr

join:2012-12-04
Courtenay, BC
reply to Arthur Dent
Good Idea lets say world its so less impersonal no offense aol.

titan_rw

join:2007-08-23
The second Telus starts enforcing / charging for bandwidth overage will be the second I switch isp's.

Between yesterday and today, I used about 250 gig. This is on a HS50 plan, but still, what's the point of having a fast connection if you can't use it?

WhosTheBosch

join:2009-12-02
reply to Kruisey
said by Kruisey:

Your thinking is incorrect.
Look at the size of the UK against Canada 62,641,000 population
In Canada a huge country compared to them only 34,482,779
Then there is USA 311,591,917 again country smaller then Canada.
Far more people.
Which equals many more customers .Guess whats next?
Makes for LOWER PRICING..

You're wrong. Look at the population centre's. The majority of the Canadian population is within 300km's of the US border centred in large clumps. Your argument has no value due to the fact that ISP's only have to make large investments in population centre's. Don't try arguing about rural communities either. Telus got those lines for free from the government subsidies and my bet is they're going to pull a Verizon and let them rot.

Kruisey

join:2006-12-30
Vancouver, BC
Excuse me but there are alot more folks living in the USA.
Therefore the pricing can be lower.
If I was a business person who would I prefer to have as a customer?
Would I wont to keep the guy that just wonted $30 a month for TV and internet?
Or the guy that just wonted a great price for internet and loaded up hours of free movies .As I mentioned before any Company would go bankrupt with folks like that.
Maybe its those folks one should blame for this move from Telus.
So how about that???
Expand your moderator at work

Ikarasu

join:2004-01-09
Port Coquitlam, BC
reply to Kruisey

Re: [BC] TELUS High Speed Turbo 25 Usage being reduced 50%

You seem pretty butthurt that I'm getting TV and internet for $30 a month Whats the matter... couldn't get as good a deal?

anhloc

join:2009-12-11
Canada
$30 for both? Wonder who the L/R agent was who gave you that deal; I'd like to talk with them.

Ikarasu

join:2004-01-09
Port Coquitlam, BC
said by anhloc:

$30 for both? Wonder who the L/R agent was who gave you that deal; I'd like to talk with them.

It's actually pretty easy. It's obviously for new subscribers only...or as long as the service has been canceled for at least 6 (Maybe 3?) Months.

Look on Redflagdeals - Theres a Telus phone rep on there. I was offered 15M internet + Telus TV and 2 PVR rentals, And a $100 service credit for $20 a month, or 25M + the rentals for $30 a month.

So 1 year of service is $360 - $100, $260. I'm essentially paying $21 a month... + whatever taxes / fees telus imposes on me. Locked in rate for 1 year, and was told after a year to call her back.

Is it cheap? Yes, But if I can only download 250 GB a month... the service is useless to me. I'm a downloader, I dont use the internet much besides downloading/Watching videos. I can hit 250 GB in a day and a half if I tried...

I do probably 300 GB a month on average, sometimes lower. Then some months, when I decide to tinker with video editing, like this month... I'm at 60 GB a day for the past week.

Not to mention I'm pretty respectful about it - I have my bandwidth set to d/l between 11 PM and 12 AM. So I'm not congesting anyone, I'm not costing Telus much/if anything at all...

I'd gladly pay $70-80 a month for 25M internet, if it was unlimited. Which is why as soon as I'm limited... I'm ditching my contract, and switching over to Teksavvy. I'll be paying tripple what I do right now, for the same service... with the caveat that I don't have to worry about going over my bandwidth. limit.

Say I go 20 GB over every month only... and get charged $20 extra. I'd still rather pay the extra $50 a month for an unlimited connection, Not just for peace of mind... but because Teksavvy decided to give the option for unlimited, because they're all about customer service / And they want an open, unrestricted internet. Well worth the extra money, IMO.


johnjake

@telus.net
reply to WhosTheBosch
First of all, a disclaimer. I work for TELUS. My message does not necessarily reflect the views of TELUS as a company, and the views expressed are entirely my own.

The fact that you state that "Telus got those lines for free from the government" and that TELUS is "going to pull a Verizon and let them rot" in reference to rural areas shows that you have a complete lack of understanding on how an ADSL network actually works.

You still need a DSLAM to provide a DSL signal over those government provided lines.

The cable distance between the DSLAM and the modem has a direct affect on the quality of service, or whether an ISP can even offer service. If the distance is too high, the service will either be degraded or just not function.

It would be prohibitively expensive to roll out 15 or 25 Mbps service in remote rural areas. Due to the size of the properties and lack of population density, an ISP could end up investing significant resources to install a DSLAM, and then only be able to service 2 or 3 households with it. If that happened, it could take decades to earn the investment back on it.

I'm not taking sides on the telus bandwidth cap issue. I'm merely pointing out that what your comment implies is, quite simply, factually incorrect and misleading from a network technology point of view.