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urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
reply to hm

Re: [Serious] Nurse who transferred prank call commits suicide

said by hm :

I didn't follow much of this at all, but from the little i heard and saw on cbc it was a prank. Period.

You made a mistake there by ending with a period as you forgot 'broadcast to the entire world'. This poor woman's caring nature was exploited for the entire world to laugh at her.

It's not even a little bit funny and it would please me if the DJ's involved received enough of a backlash for their horrible behaviour to encourage them to suicide. I heard the 'prank' on the news before this woman's suicide and I thought it was just as classless as I do now.


shaner
Premium
join:2000-10-04
Calgary, AB
reply to Wolfie00
It doesn't even need to be any of that. The hospital or royal family gave no indication that they were pissed at her. To me, this sounds like a woman who took deep pride in her duty to the royal family and felt that she had horribly failed them.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to HiVolt
said by HiVolt:

Sad story and all, but the woman must have had other problems if this triggered suicide...

Perhaps, but one should also keep in mind that the British media is relentless and puts what we have here in North America to shame when it comes to hounding people.


Hydraglass
Premium
join:2002-05-08
Kingston, ON
reply to Wolfie00
said by Wolfie00:

said by Hydraglass:

If this woman was that easily driven to suicide by a couple of phone pranksters from half a world away, she had other problems. Whether she sought out treatment or not, that's on her and those around her.

I'm going to use your comment to make a general response directed to several others as well, all of whom seem to be jumping on this "blame the victim" bandwagon.

There's a lot that we don't know here -- that much is clear. But instead of assuming that there are all kinds of things we don't know about her mental health, maybe it's more realistic to think that there are all kinds of things we don't know about what happened to her in the aftermath of this. Just as a for instance, suppose the hospital had basically told her that her career was over -- not just in that hospital, but effectively anywhere in the medical system. A career that she had trained for all her life and was probably performing exceptionally, since she was assigned to this case. Do you have any idea what that can do to a person? Really, do you?

The hospital has already released several statements that they had no disciplinary actions toward her, and that everyone there felt equally bad... in the meantime even the royals have said they had no ill will or request for discipline toward any of the staff at the hospital and felt bad for them as well. It would seem it would have been in her best interest to just lay low for a few days, take some sick leave, let it blow over, and head back - but even on top of that - how many people have been booted from their careers and done just fine - most of us at one point or another no? We all have no problem making fun of those 5 (out of 50,000) stock investors who jump out of their high rise offices on the day the market plunges...

Sorry, but I'm sure there was plenty of support available for her to get through this and have not abandoned her kids and family.


hm

@videotron.ca
reply to shaner
said by shaner:

The hospital or royal family gave no indication that they were pissed at her.

Yes they did. Hospital said she was to be removed from duty and to undergo further training. Hospital stated she wasn't fired though.


Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8
reply to shaner
I believe that the royal family would have had the grace not to make a fuss about it. I'm much less sure that the hospital was as "supportive" as they claim, and, as already said, the British media can be a bitch.

There are lessons here on several levels. One thing that's clear to me is that a "prank" like this is way over the bounds of good taste. It's one thing to call a politician pretending to be another politician (as has happened often, and often to good effect!) but this is altogether too personal, and moreover, it invites the breach of medical confidentiality. The dipshits who made the call appeared to be too stupid to understand this.


donoreo
Premium
join:2002-05-30
North York, ON
reply to Steve
said by Steve:

said by shaner:

Suicide is almost always about thinking you're actually making things better for your loved ones by not being around.

This. It's very sad.

However it is ironic because it never does. I have seen suicide called the ultimate selfish act because of how much it hurts those you leave behind.
--
The irony of common sense, it is not that common.
I cannot deny anything I did not say.
A kitten dies every time someone uses "then" and "than" incorrectly.
I mock people who give their children odd spelling of names.

bt

join:2009-02-26
canada
kudos:1
reply to Wolfie00
said by Wolfie00:

I believe that the royal family would have had the grace not to make a fuss about it.

Prince Charles has even made jokes about it, before this latest piece of news.


Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
Prince Charles is a lot more easy-going and of a "live and let live" attitude than many people know.

Prince Philip is the grouch of the family.


donoreo
Premium
join:2002-05-30
North York, ON
said by Gone:

Prince Charles is a lot more easy-going and of a "live and let live" attitude than many people know.

Prince Philip is the grouch of the family.

Yes, but apparently he does have a good sense of humour to balance the grouchiness.


Wolfie00
My dog is an elitist
Premium
join:2005-03-12
kudos:8
reply to Hydraglass
said by Hydraglass:

how many people have been booted from their careers and done just fine - most of us at one point or another no?

That was just an example. We don't know if that happened, but if something like that did, or if she thought that it was inevitable, your armchair psychoanalysis is flawed. A critical determinant of our ability to cope with a major setback is the extent to which we're conditioned to it over time. Something that happens completely out of the blue is far more devastating than something that we've been expecting for years.

Incidentally, the opposite is true, too. Studies have shown that many lottery winners go on to lead surprisingly miserable lives because the incredible high of "the day they won the lottery" leads to expectations that real life inevitably cannot fulfill. Whereas people who gradually become wealthy can realistically cope.
--
"The promoters of the global economy see nothing odd or difficult about unlimited economic growth or unlimited consumption in a limited world."
Wendell Berry

peterboro
Avatars are for posers
Premium
join:2006-11-03
Peterborough, ON

1 recommendation

reply to Hydraglass
said by Hydraglass:

The hospital has already released several statements that they had no disciplinary actions toward her, and that everyone there felt equally bad...

Of course they are saying that now. But her initial interaction was probably along the lines of hospital administration trying to find ways to shift the blame to her. They just never got the chance.

If they are anything like the morally bankrupt bunch that run the hospital in Peterborough she would have been quickly dispatched once the public scrutiny stopped.


FFH5
Premium
join:2002-03-03
Tavistock NJ
kudos:5
reply to Wolfie00
said by Wolfie00:

I was just reading about this and it's truly sad.

A little confusing, though, and I think it's being poorly described due to the usual crap journalism. It's been described as the person who "put through" the call, but that person at the actual main switchboard was only on the phone for a few seconds and likely not even a nurse. The nurse who picked up the phone in the ward and spoke with them and actually gave them real information is undoubtedly who they're talking about.

CBC has a recording of the call and it's pretty innocuous, mostly just a stupid stunt of the kind that happens all the time (remember when Sarah Palin got a call from a Quebec DJ impersonating the President of France?). How it could lead to a suicide is perplexing. I suspect there's a lot more that we're not being told. The hospital claims they were "supportive" of the nurse, but I wouldn't be surprised to find out that they dumped on her in a really major way. Maybe one of the downsides of the reverence with which royalty is still regarded over there. OTOH, medical confidentiality does apply to everyone.

I get the feeling too that she must have taken some real grief from bosses at hospital to get so depressed she killed herself. Suicide seems pretty drastic if all she suffered was embarrassment.
--
A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves money from the public treasury.


dirtyjeffer
Anons on ignore, but not due to fear.
Premium
join:2002-02-21
London, ON
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

Perhaps, but one should also keep in mind that the British media is relentless and puts what we have here in North America to shame when it comes to hounding people.

funny you mention that...my coworker told me the same thing...his wife (prior to him meeting her) spent several years in England and said the same thing.


Steve
I know your IP address
Consultant
join:2001-03-10
Foothill Ranch, CA
kudos:5
reply to Gone
said by Gone:

Perhaps, but one should also keep in mind that the British media is relentless and puts what we have here in North America to shame when it comes to hounding people.

Especially when it comes to royals.


Thane_Bitter
Inquire within
Premium
join:2005-01-20
Reviews:
·Bell Sympatico
reply to donoreo
Literally a waste of life.
My understanding was she was not the nurse to divulge the intimate details of the Duchess’ condition, she only transfered the call, yet she felt bad enough to kill herself and leave two kids behind - that's such a tragedy.

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
Yes, and the prank call was 5:30 AM local time, no switchboard operator at night, so this nurse was the person who initially answered the call and transferred it to the nurse taking care of the Duchess.

A real shame.


shaner
Premium
join:2000-10-04
Calgary, AB
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

The company has responded on Facebook:

»www.facebook.com/2DayFM

The facebook page has been deleted.

Edit: No it hasn't. That appears to be an error by CTV news who linked to the wrong site address.

»www.facebook.com/2dayfm.

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
reply to donoreo
We have a lot of "shock jocks" in the US, but these Australians are assholes beyond the pale.

2DayFM has a history of public humiliation. In 2009, a 14-year-old girl was tricked into acknowledging that she had been raped at the age of 12 -- only to be asked by a DJ: "Is that the only experience you've had?"

That led the Australian Communications and Media Authority to censure the station -- saying the broadcast did not meet standards of decency. The station said it had provided the teenager with counseling and vowed "to prevent anything similar from happening again."

But 2DayFM has been the subject of several inquiries since; and this year was told it "must not broadcast material that demeans or is likely to demean women or girls" as a condition of keeping its license.

That followed a broadcast in which a female journalist was called a derogatory term and told "to watch your mouth or I'll hunt you down" by DJ Kyle Sandilands.

»www.cnn.com/2012/12/07/world/eur···dex.html


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to donoreo
London police are in contact with Australian police. They want to interview the DJs. The call may have been illegal under Australian law and in violation of the national broadcasting standards and the station's license conditions. Some advertisers are running fast in the opposite direction.

»www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20656911#
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to PX Eliezer70
said by PX Eliezer70:

Yes, and the prank call was 5:30 AM local time, no switchboard operator at night, so this nurse was the person who initially answered the call and transferred it to the nurse taking care of the Duchess.

A real shame.

No small hospital (this is a "boutique" maternity hospital, remember) has staff on the switchboard 24/7. It would not be unusual for a night staff nurse to answer the telephone.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to Hydraglass
said by Hydraglass:

Sorry but suicide is almost always the "victim"'s fault. It's selfish.

And that is such utter, complete nonsense, it does not even deserve comment. Suicide is usually the result of a pre-existing medical condition and often a co-morbid outcome (cultural factors excepted, which are not at play here).
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to shaner
said by shaner:

It doesn't even need to be any of that. The hospital or royal family gave no indication that they were pissed at her. To me, this sounds like a woman who took deep pride in her duty to the royal family and felt that she had horribly failed them.

Quite right. The responsibility of care in nursing (at least among those who are competent) is every bit as intense as that of a police officer or the military. It's not called a "sisterhood" for nothing. And given that this nurse was a part of a hospital who was serving the Royal Family, she would have to be not only clinically top notch, but epitomize all the values of dedication and commitment which come with nursing quality.

Maternity nurses are also a special breed. The best are every bit as intense and professional as ICU or ER nurses.

I recall talking with one nurse after a Code Pink call in our hospital. She downplayed her role in the situation, which was life-threatening. "Yes, the little guy just didn't want to do what he needed to do, so we had to help him a little bit." That was it. Very humble. But what they did (and I know this for a fact) was quite remarkable. It saved the child's life.
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.


DKS
Damn Kidney Stones
Premium,ExMod 2002
join:2001-03-22
Owen Sound, ON
kudos:2
reply to hm
said by hm :

said by shaner:

The hospital or royal family gave no indication that they were pissed at her.

Yes they did. Hospital said she was to be removed from duty and to undergo further training. Hospital stated she wasn't fired though.

Evidence?
--
Need-based health care not greed-based health care.

peterboro
Avatars are for posers
Premium
join:2006-11-03
Peterborough, ON
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

No small hospital (this is a "boutique" maternity hospital, remember) has staff on the switchboard 24/7. It would not be unusual for a night staff nurse to answer the telephone.

The charge nurse on duty, who may have no or less patients, would be the appropriate person to answer the phone at that time of night.

peterboro
Avatars are for posers
Premium
join:2006-11-03
Peterborough, ON
reply to DKS
said by DKS:

Quite right. The responsibility of care in nursing (at least among those who are competent) is every bit as intense as that of a police officer or the military. It's not called a "sisterhood" for nothing. And given that this nurse was a part of a hospital who was serving the Royal Family, she would have to be not only clinically top notch, but epitomize all the values of dedication and commitment which come with nursing quality.

I am also in line with that reasoning. On the other hand I am very curious as to the interaction she had with with administration before she left the hospital.

PX Eliezer70
Premium
join:2008-08-09
Hutt River
kudos:13
reply to DKS
The nurse was from India and I believe had been in the UK for only 4 years. Cultural differences and embarrassment likely also played a role.

This news story says the radio station [continues] to brag about the prank call.

»daily.bhaskar.com/article/WOR-TO···NOR.html

The radio network CEO also said (in another news story) that there was nothing illegal done.

I don't know. In any civilized country if someone calls me and pretends to be someone else (even a regular Elizabeth not Queen Elizabeth) for the purpose of deception, and if they broadcast that deception on the air, then surely that is violating [some] kind of law....laws regulating phone recording if nothing else.

In a Commonwealth Realm such as Australia, impersonating the Queen herself may be covered under some additional law, too.


urbanriot
Premium
join:2004-10-18
Canada
kudos:3
Reviews:
·Cogeco Cable
said by PX Eliezer70:

The nurse was from India and I believe had been in the UK for only 4 years. Cultural differences and embarrassment likely also played a role.

9 years ago and I doubt 'cultural differences' has anything to do with anything. Having the entire world scrutinize a woman's actions is more than likely the primary motivator here...

All the latest stories and people interviewed paint a picture of a caring, intelligent, woman who was good at her job and was doing professionally well in London. Family members in India said that she called every Sunday without fail and they just spoke with them a day prior and no issues were mentioned. So far there doesn't seem to be anything that suggests there's an alternative reason for what happened outside of the pressure of this event.

Warez_Zealot

join:2006-04-19
Vancouver
said by urbanriot:

said by PX Eliezer70:

The nurse was from India and I believe had been in the UK for only 4 years. Cultural differences and embarrassment likely also played a role.

9 years ago and I doubt 'cultural differences' has anything to do with anything. Having the entire world scrutinize a woman's actions is more than likely the primary motivator here...

All the latest stories and people interviewed paint a picture of a caring, intelligent, woman who was good at her job and was doing professionally well in London. Family members in India said that she called every Sunday without fail and they just spoke with them a day prior and no issues were mentioned. So far there doesn't seem to be anything that suggests there's an alternative reason for what happened outside of the pressure of this event.

I hope they have their asses fired and get black listed from ever working in the industry again.
--
"You're not supposed to be so blind with patriotism that you can't face reality. Wrong is wrong, no matter who says it."-Malcolm X



Gone
Premium
join:2011-01-24
Fort Erie, ON
kudos:4
reply to peterboro
said by peterboro:

The charge nurse on duty, who may have no or less patients, would be the appropriate person to answer the phone at that time of night.

Based on my experience when my son was born a charge nurse at the nursing station was only on duty from 8AM to 8PM. Incoming calls to the ward after hours were handled in the manner exactly described by DKS - any available nurse answered the phone.