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oneirodyne

join:2004-09-03
Marietta, GA

2 edits

[Connectivity] self install question

If i were to provide the coax to the outside of my house, what are the qualities it must have to be acceptable to the Comcast installer? RG6 - but what else? Indoor/outdoor rated? rated for underground? (it shouldn't need to be buried as far as I can see) Separate Ground wire? Shielding - anything beyond quad shield needed? Connector type inside? (contractor would reterminate it at the outside end anyway)

I don't want TV or phone, just HSI. I don't have a cable tv service, and don't want any. So additional wires besides the one leading from inside where the modem is to outside shouldn't be needed. Will a splitter need to be spliced in despite the lack of TV service?

(I should say that I have no trouble running a cable from the point inside where I want the cable modem to the outside through the foundation wall. There is some coax already but it's old and cruddy and I'd rather not yank it out and replace it - or have the installer yank it. I can also do compression connections, and the distance involved is so short a premade cable from a store could make the connection quite easily.)

I'm hoping to have the site wiring all ready to go when the Comcast truck arrives (order not yet placed) so that the installer just hooks my wire up to the wire out in the street, tests the signal at that point of connection, hands me a modem and leaves. Is this possible?
Thanks.


NetFixer
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FWIW, if an installer truck roll is required because there is not an existing Comcast drop, it is not a self install.

In that case, you might just as well allow the Comcast installer to put in new cable since that should be included in the installation fee.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.


joako
Premium
join:2000-09-07
/dev/null
kudos:6
You would just need regular RG-6 cable. Comcast will need an area outside where they can install a ground block and install a proper ground. Properly installed compression connectors are the way to go.
--
PRescott7-2097


telcodad
Premium
join:2011-09-16
Lincroft, NJ
kudos:15

1 edit
reply to NetFixer
Click for full size
Comcast Installation Charges
said by NetFixer:

FWIW, if an installer truck roll is required because there is not an existing Comcast drop, it is not a self install.

In that case, you might just as well allow the Comcast installer to put in new cable since that should be included in the installation fee.

Here are the latest Installation Charges for my area.

Unless there is a "Free Installation" promotion in effect at the time, then the "Standard Installation" fee would normally apply, I would think.

But if the OP does his own inside wiring, I'm not sure which type of charge would apply in that case. "Non-standard Installation work" at the hourly rate ("Note 3" = "Billed in 15-minute increments")?

EDIT: I would think that if the hourly-rate charge exceeds the standard installation charge, then the lower charge would apply.


flwpwr

@comcast.net
reply to oneirodyne
There is no indoor/outdoor rating on RG6, that's all in teh connectors, and how to use them most of the time you just add rubber grommets to teh connection points such as splitter or ground block and its outside.

What our manual currently requires us to use and recommend to people interested is 77% braided RG6 with foil, foam insulator, and an impedance between the center conductor and shield of 75 Ohms.

Insulator can be solid polyethylene in the stores, but this is bad for CATV, its attenuation rate is higher than the foam insulators. It also usually does not have the right shielding system when investigated into introducing noise into your system and possible the entire network. basically make sure you do not use solid polythene insulator CATV, more common on rg59 but can be found in rg6, I see it probably once a month as 6 and once a day as 59. Usually in jumpers from the wall to the boxes, sometimes inside the walls as outlets and less frequency as drops but ever so often its there too. Just an older design that still gets produced and used.

oneirodyne

join:2004-09-03
Marietta, GA
reply to oneirodyne
Thanks to all,
Is there a recognized, optimal cable that an installer would like to see?

Or if there isn't, would Belden 7915a be acceptable? I can order this, or any of the similar Belden coax models (7016a or 1694a) from at least one online supplier, preterminated with weatherproof Thomas & Betts compression connectors.

Belden 7915a
"18 AWG solid .040" bare copper conductor, gas-injected foam polyethylene insulation, Duobond® + aluminum braid shield (77% coverage), PVC jacket"

Is there a need (or procedural requirement) to install a splitter if there isn't going to be any cable TV service?

Thanks


NetFixer
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said by oneirodyne:

Thanks to all,
Is there a recognized, optimal cable that an installer would like to see?

Or if there isn't, would Belden 7915a be acceptable? I can order this, or any of the similar Belden coax models (7016a or 1694a) from at least one online supplier, preterminated with weatherproof Thomas & Betts compression connectors.

Belden 7915a
"18 AWG solid .040" bare copper conductor, gas-injected foam polyethylene insulation, Duobond® + aluminum braid shield (77% coverage), PVC jacket"

Is there a need (or procedural requirement) to install a splitter if there isn't going to be any cable TV service?

Thanks

The Belden coax should be perfect.

There is no requirement for a splitter if you are only connecting the service to a single cable modem. In fact, if you so desire, you can just run your wall feed through cable directly to the modem without even using a wall mounted jack. Comcast installers in my experience actually do that quite often when only a single inside device is being connected. The original connection in my apartment was done that way, but I installed a wall jack myself both for appearance and to have a convenient easily disconnected inside demarc.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.

oneirodyne

join:2004-09-03
Marietta, GA
Thanks, you described what I am after. I am hoping to have an unbroken short run of coax from the box outside to my cable modem, both of which will be my responsibility and right to install and maintain. It won't be as neat and tidy as cable running through the wall to a jack, but I'll be able to maintain it myself quickly and easily.

There's an old radiator pipe hole in the floor of the room at the corner where telephone and cable come to the house. Vents left in the brick foundation just below this point allow me to easily run data cable to the outside of the house. My DSL has long been hooked up this way. A short, loose run of Cat5 runs in from the NID up into this room to a whole house type splitter with no jacks or junctions in between. Another short run of Cat5 connects the modem. It's as short and clean as I can make it -even so, I have sucky DSL service now and it's been bad for months.

I can inspect the whole line to the NID for damage easily by pulling it to the outside of the house or up into the house. I can quickly check and rework all the connections since they are few and easily accessed. I can replace the whole thing if I need to with minimal time and effort. That happened once due to varmints chewing the line outside. If there's any problem I can know with certainty that it's not on my end, which is good to know when talking to tech support.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
Premium
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Springfield, MA
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reply to oneirodyne
If you do run your own wire, use a good quality RG 6 cabling and use Snap n Seal fittings (available at Lowe's Depot). I would also go the extra mile and finish the inside outlet with a wall plate. I don't like it when installers cut corners and just pull cabling through the wall/floor and just terminate the end of it.

They will have to install a grey box (similar to a telco demarc) where the cable comes in because NEC now requires that ground blocks installed outdoors must be in a weather resistant housing. When I was living in Iowa, the cableco there installed a weatherproof box for the ground block that was large enough to house 20 ground blocks (although I think splitters now need to be in weatherproof enclosures as well).

My ground block and splitters are in the basement on the ceiling adjacent to the electrical panel.


NetFixer
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said by IowaCowboy:

I would also go the extra mile and finish the inside outlet with a wall plate. I don't like it when installers cut corners and just pull cabling through the wall/floor and just terminate the end of it.

A direct connection to the cable modem (with no intermediate wall plate splice connection) is only a "cut corner" if it is done against your wishes. The OP has already stated that a simple direct connection is exactly what is wanted in this particular case.
--
We can never have enough of nature.
We need to witness our own limits transgressed, and some life pasturing freely where we never wander.

Phil T

join:2007-10-05
Littleton, CO
reply to IowaCowboy
I just had a new install (internet only) and they did not install a box. They did install a the ground block and ground rod but just bolted it to the siding. They used my RG6 that I had run from the modem and put on their connectors.