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Korpers

join:2012-12-07
reply to Korpers

Re: [WIN7] Computer Always Freezing - Sometimes crashes.

It's Windows 7 Ultimate and everything is installed on the C: drive. D: drive (I actually use Z: for work purposes) is just storage really.

I'm a bit dubious about imaging the 120Gb, as if there are any bad sectors, wont it image the errors? Or doesnt it work like that?

I still have 5 hours left on the back up (220gb to go) so I have time to think about it.


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
I don't think it will image the bad sectors, but it will image bad data lying under them. Absent any other guidance to the contrary, if it were me

For a 2 drive setup:

1)Remove the 2TB for safe keeping 2) I would run CHKDSK /F /R on the C: drive. That may take a while to complete. If all goes well that will re-locate any data it finds on marginal sectors and mark the sectors as bad, so I assume the image would then ignore that. You should be notified of any areas it can't recover the files from and what files are involved. Then use Windows Backup to do an image. Create a recovery CD from the backup menu. Then just replace the drive, boot off the recovery CD and restore the image. It is my recollection that Windows backup will restore the data so that the partition that existed is restored in its original size. So if for instance you put in a 1TB HD, you are going to only use 120GB of it. No problem, because disk management should allow you to expand that drive to full capacity when you are done.

For a 1 drive setup:
Backup your data drive (2TB) two times in two different places. I would simply copy the files, not use a backup program for at least one of the backups.

Do the CHKDSK above and then image the 120. Make the recovery CD. Remove the 120. Boot off the recovery CD and restore the backup to the 2TB. This will erase everything on the 2TB. Then expand the 2TB or create a 2nd partition for the data. My advice is 120GB is too small. I would allow at least 250GB for the program/OS partition. Copy your data back.

In either case, if the image will not complete, your machine locks or all hell breaks lose on the CHKDSK, you are going to have to reinstall. If you reinstall, I don't think you will have to erase the 2TB just to install the OS on it. Back it up just in case though. We have a FAQ here on how to do a clean install with upgrade media.


norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
kudos:1
It would not hurt to look at keeping an image after running chkdsk on it for back up sake. Then run the Sea tools utility on the hard drive to see what it says, and if it comes back good, zero the the drive as well to allow the sectors to be correctly allocated good/bad. The concern on the image for reloading though would be wanting to load the image on top of bad sectors which have been designated not usable anymore. However if the OP is happy to just start again then it might be the safest long term goal.

I prefer to start again myself, but I can understand where a lot of years work and a system you are used to might be worth spending the extra time to try and keep rather than starting fresh. I guess it's a personal thing.
--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
Once a drive causes me any difficulty I get rid of it. It just isn't worth the risk to me. My theory is good hard drives don't go bad on you Not sure what you are saying about loading on top of bad sectors as I wasn't expecting the OP to re-use the drive. I'm just concerned about file corruption/loss that gets copied to a new drive. Fact is, the system is booting up without error (I presume) and that is a great sign. Not sure he will be able to get a successful image, but it couldn't hurt to try. Reloading is a personal thing, I agree. Some people use 4 applications and others use 400. The degree of difficulty is hard to gauge without seeing the system. I couldn't agree more about re-loading being the safest course.


norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback
kudos:1
said by Kramer:

Once a drive causes me any difficulty I get rid of it. It just isn't worth the risk to me. My theory is good hard drives don't go bad on you Not sure what you are saying about loading on top of bad sectors as I wasn't expecting the OP to re-use the drive.

Ah, neither was I - I mis-read you - it was early due to a cat running full circles of the house when it should have been sleeping. The hard drive is a paper weight basically.

said by Kramer:

I'm just concerned about file corruption/loss that gets copied to a new drive..../
/.....Some people use 4 applications and others use 400. The degree of difficulty is hard to gauge without seeing the system. I couldn't agree more about re-loading being the safest course.

I forget because I prefer to start fresh, many others use images, and this present system if imaged will more than likely carry across errors. 232 sectors is a lot to be reallocating, and the data contained in those sectors......but the back up image is worth keeping just in case if the user has 400 applications and there is a lost key to software that is important - it can be loaded onto a small drive and only plugged in when required for that job. I can imagine the emails to software vendors if a few hundred applications needed keys sourced for a new installation.

Incremental image back ups come in handy.
--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke



Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
CHKDSK will possibly de-allocate the bad sectors. As long as they are cleared out, his odds aren't magnificent, but they are pretty fair no important system or program files are effected. That drive is going to have a lot of useless (for the next drive) garbage on it. The page file could be darned close to 10 percent of the drive or even more. There could be a ton of temporary files, cookies, restore points, hibernation file, etc. Probably close to half that drive is nothing but crap. Odds are good those bad sectors are relatively close to one another too. It's probably a 50/50 crap shoot by the time you get done. Maybe one piece of software malfunctions. No big deal. The big question is whether or not an image is even possible at this point. I think that's the longest odds he faces.

Korpers

join:2012-12-07
reply to Korpers
Hi Guys - Ok, I've sorted it.

I backed up my 2TB drive (took 7 hours) and then set about running a check disk on my OS 120GB drive, to then do a disk image and put it on the 2TB drive after formatting it.

Problem was the CHKDSK stopped on stage 4. It simply froze, and that was the last straw for me. I removed the drive, wrote in big black sharpie 'BAD DRIVE' and popped it in a draw to never be used again. I'll probably take it apart at some point and get hold of the juicy magnets inside (thanks Kramer) but now I am running my OS on the 2TB drive.....and everything is peachy again.

I will also probably invest in some cloud storage for the future too - it seems like a good idea to me.

Anyway, I just wanted to say thanks for all your help and advice - it was invaluable.

I guess this thread can now be closed.

Fzzzzzzt.....*pop*


Kramer
Premium,Mod
join:2000-08-03
Richmond, VA
kudos:2
Sorry to hear the CHKDSK was not successful. I've seen it take days in some cases. I've learned to not assume it has frozen unless it sticks at the same point for a number of hours. At least your new OS install will give you the confidence that everything is right.

Enjoy the magnets, but don't get your finger between one of them and a piece of metal. It can really hurt! One of the magnets by the way is usually on a bracket that makes it bad for refrigerators. I just bend the bracket back with a vise grip while the whole thing is in a vise. The other magnet is ready to go usually.
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