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Thinkdiff
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-07
Bronx, NY
kudos:11
reply to Logan Five

Re: Disk Image on a hard drive

I'm confused at what you're asking exactly.

In Mac terminology, "Disk image" usually refers to a .dmg file, which when opened looks like a disk. You can use CCC to clone your drive to a disk image, but it won't be bootable. It's just for archival purposes.

If you mean you want clone your main drive to a secondary drive (a bootable clone), then yes, you can store other stuff on the external, but it's not a great idea. Better to partition the external drive into 1 partition the size of your internal disk and then a second partition covering the rest of the drive. Then you'll have a "clone" partition and a "other data" partition. The clone will still be bootable.

If you really meant saving your startup disk to a disk image, then yes, you can definitely store other stuff on the drive where you keep the disk image. It's just a normal file.
--
University of Southern California - Fight On!


Logan Five

join:2001-09-06
Ohio
Hi,

Thank you and yes I want to make a bootable clone, sorry for the confusion. And thanks for the tip to partition the drive. I have another drive I use for backups via Time Machine and was just curious if I could use the new drive for both a bootable clone and additional Time Machine back ups.

Now I just have to figure out to partition a drive.

Logan
--
“When you're in jail, a good friend will be trying to bail you out. A best friend will be in the cell next to you saying, 'Damn, that was fun'.”

Groucho Marx


Thinkdiff
Premium,MVM
join:2001-08-07
Bronx, NY
kudos:11
Time Machine will consume as much space as you give it, so it's generally a good idea to dedicate a single partition to Time Machine.

Partitioning is a piece of cake. Launch Disk Utility, select the drive you want to partition, go to the Partition tab. If you want to add a partition non-destructively to a GUID partitioned drive, press the + icon. If you want to erase all current data, switch the Partition layout from "Current" to 2 or 3 partitions. Give them names and format them as Mac OS Extended Journaled.

After pressing the Apply button, read the warning message very carefully. It'll explain exactly what it's doing (erasing "old data", creating two partitions "new data 1" and "new data 2", etc). If something doesn't look right, press cancel.
--
University of Southern California - Fight On!


Logan Five

join:2001-09-06
Ohio
Thinkdiff,

Thanks, that does seem pretty easy. Since it will be a new drive from OWC I assume I will do the "add a partition non-destructively to a GUID partitioned drive". I will split the new drive in to two 500 GB partitions.

Logan
--
“When you're in jail, a good friend will be trying to bail you out. A best friend will be in the cell next to you saying, 'Damn, that was fun'.”

Groucho Marx