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IowaCowboy
Iowa native
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join:2010-10-16
Springfield, MA
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Ceiling heights

I am thinking of purchasing some exercise equipment (most notably an elliptical and possibly a treadmill) to put in my unfinished basement. The ceiling height (if I measured it correctly) is about 7 feet 2 inches. I am about 5' 5". I am asking this so I can know if such equipment will fit in the space as it is hard to size equipment in such spaces as the showroom at Sears is huge compared to most living spaces.

garys_2k
Premium
join:2004-05-07
Farmington, MI
Any equipment you want to buy will specify its height. The big issue will be getting the stuff down the stairs, most likely you'll need to assemble it in the basement.


IowaCowboy
Iowa native
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Springfield, MA
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said by garys_2k:

Any equipment you want to buy will specify its height. The big issue will be getting the stuff down the stairs, most likely you'll need to assemble it in the basement.

What I am concerned about is the height of the equipment while it is occupied by the user (which is why I specified my height of 5' 5" in the original post). I know the code around here specifies a minimum ceiling height of 7". This is for the town of Amherst, MA (I'm in Springfield) but it is the state of Massachusetts building code. »www.amherstma.gov/DocumentCenter···View/119


boogi man

join:2001-11-13
Jacksonville, FL
kudos:1
treadmill should be ok for your height. the elliptical on the other hand may or may not be you'll want to check the height of the foot pads with a tape measure at their highest point and then do the math.
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bemis

join:2008-07-18
Reading, MA
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reply to IowaCowboy
said by IowaCowboy:

I know the code around here specifies a minimum ceiling height of 7". This is for the town of Amherst, MA (I'm in Springfield) but it is the state of Massachusetts building code. »www.amherstma.gov/DocumentCenter···View/119

Why does building code matter?

I'd go to Sears with a tape measure and try to measure the foot cups at their highest point... then add 5'5" and maybe another 4" for safety... if it's more than your current floor to ceiling height you have an issue.

When I moved I wanted to put my treadmill in the basement, but found it would be way too close for my comfort (6')...

To be honest, I don't know what you're planning to spend on that machine, but a membership to the Y might be better in the long run. More equipment available, and usually better than you get for home, and no space taken up... I paid $400 for my treadmill, if I also wanted an elliptical and some weights I could easily be close to $1000. Add to that the fact that my treadmill is smaller and less robust feeling then the ones at the gym... I bet you can can get almost 2 years of membership for $1000.

Hellrazor
Bah Humbug

join:2002-02-02
Abyss, PA
reply to IowaCowboy
7"? You guys are really short up there.

TheSMJ

join:2009-08-19
Farmington, MI
reply to IowaCowboy
What exercises do you plan on doing?

Most equipment will do just fine with that ceiling height. You might run into problems trying to do a standing overhead press, or anything which involves lifting the weight over your head while standing.

Otherwise, that ceiling should be plenty tall enough for a treadmill and/or elliptical, unless it's unusually tall. If you're buying the equipment locally, have someone measure how tall you stand while on the equipment. If you're buying online, look up the equipment's dimensions and you should be able to estimate how tall you'd stand on it.


ArgMeMatey

join:2001-08-09
Milwaukee, WI
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reply to IowaCowboy
I had my basement ductwork built so I could walk under it without ducking, about 6'4".

My wife's treadmill (Sole F63) sits under the ductwork. She's 5-4 and it works fine for her, even when elevated fully to "uphill" height.

So it's going to depend on the model and the max elevation.
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36165318

join:2012-12-12
reply to IowaCowboy
Most of us would not thump our heads on 7' ceilings - some of the great Frank Lloyd Wright's homes were in fact built with 7' ceilings. Higher ceilings simply seem to result in more volume to cool or to heat.


Draiman
Let me see those devil horns in the sky

join:2012-06-01
Kill Devil Hills, NC
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said by 36165318:

Most of us would not thump our heads on 7' ceilings - some of the great Frank Lloyd Wright's homes were in fact built with 7' ceilings. Higher ceilings simply seem to result in more volume to cool or to heat.

For cooling high ceiling are better since heat rises you want it above you so you feel cooler. For heating higher is worst since you want the heat lower. The ceiling height really doesn't matter much since it's a pro and a con equally for climate control reasons.
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