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danielc

join:2012-12-12
Toronto, ON

Cisco DPC3010 Cable Modem

Hello everyone!

Could somebody please confirm whether Rogers accepts this modem on their network. Thank you in advance.



sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13
Reviews:
·WIND Mobile
·TekSavvy Cable

In general, Rogers accepts NO modems that they haven't supplied on their network. If you are with a 3rd party ISP (TPIA) that uses Rogers, they will accept a limited number of modems for which each TPIA has sought permission.

It may work, and you MAY get someone's arm twisted to get it accepted, but normally, if not supplied by them, no.



elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2
reply to danielc

If you're a gambling man:

Go buy a Cisco DPC3010. Leave it sealed in the retail package, cellophane and all. The MAC and serial are printed on the outside of the box. Call Rogers Retail Fulfillment (1-877-236-7208) and tell them you have purchased a DPC3010 and want it activated.

Worst case scenario: they refuse and after numerous attempts you return it to the retail store within 15 days and get your money back.

Best case scenario: Retail Fulfillment takes about 3 minutes to get it up and running and you have yourself a standalone D3 modem that won't be subjected to Rogers faulty firmware updates.

You pays your dime and takes your chances.......'nuff said.


grand total

join:2005-10-26
Mississauga
kudos:2
Reviews:
·Anveo
·VMedia
reply to danielc

They did accept the gateway version of your modem, the DPC3825 in my case. I think you may stand a better chance going that route.

I had a web chat with one of their techs to confirm that they would accept the DPC3825 so that at least I had some sort of proof of a 'conversation' on the subject before I actually bought the gateway. I have it running in bridged mode i.e. acting as a plain modem.
--
DPC3825 (bridged mode) - WRT610N + Tomato - Panasonic KX-TGP500 - Asterisk 1.8.11.0 with Asterisk GUI on Virtual Server
Anveo - FreePhoneLine - Voxbeam - Numbergroup - Callcentric - VoIP.MS - Localphone - UKDDI


arthurwinslo

join:2012-11-30
Toronto, ON
reply to danielc

There are literally a handful of DPC3010's on the Rogers network.

The firmware that Rogers pushes to them is dpc3010-v302r12901-110919a-L2VPN



sbrook
Premium,Mod
join:2001-12-14
Ottawa
kudos:13

All very well saying there are a handful of them ... but getting them approved and registered is another matter arthurwinslo!


danielc

join:2012-12-12
Toronto, ON
reply to danielc

Thank you all for your answers!

It's ridiculous that in a country like Canada we have to put up with nonsense such as this. There is nothing wrong with this modem, but I'm sure Rogers standards don't include it, simply because it limits their ability to squeeze their customers for more money.



stuc

@96.125.134.x

We are currently using the DPC3010 from a third party reseller of rogers on a business account.

They use it but they rather charge you for something "more featured"



LazMan
Premium
join:2003-03-26
canada
reply to danielc

said by danielc:

Thank you all for your answers!

It's ridiculous that in a country like Canada we have to put up with nonsense such as this. There is nothing wrong with this modem, but I'm sure Rogers standards don't include it, simply because it limits their ability to squeeze their customers for more money.

While I get your frustration, remember - it's Roger's network - they are free to support whatever hardware they choose, and implement whatever policies they please... And you are free to use them, or not.

There are some good technical arguments to maintain as small, and standard a hardware base as possible... That's generally the postion Rogers has taken, and to be honest, it's worked well for them. A limited list of models 'out there' - means limited number of firmware and software files to maintain and update, a limited number of configuration profiles to maintain, and easier time troubleshooting due to more common configurations.

If you don't want to go with a Rogers or TPIA provided modem, as has been said, you're rolling the dice - Rogers may or may not activate it, as their whim of the day dictates.

arthurwinslo

join:2012-11-30
Toronto, ON
reply to sbrook

sbrook: I'm not quite sure what it is you mean by the first part of your statement to me?


JAC70

join:2008-10-20
canada

said by arthurwinslo:

sbrook: I'm not quite sure what it is you mean by the first part of your statement to me?

I believe he means that while some customers have had success getting that modem activated on the Rogers network, the odds of it happening are pretty slim.

said by danielc:

It's ridiculous that in a country like Canada we have to put up with nonsense such as this. There is nothing wrong with this modem, but I'm sure Rogers standards don't include it, simply because it limits their ability to squeeze their customers for more money.

Same thing Apple does by restricting OSX to Macs. Less hardware, less support headaches.

yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4
reply to danielc

said by danielc:

Thank you all for your answers!

It's ridiculous that in a country like Canada we have to put up with nonsense such as this. There is nothing wrong with this modem, but I'm sure Rogers standards don't include it, simply because it limits their ability to squeeze their customers for more money.

There is nothing wrong with any modem that is on the market today, they all go through cablelabs certification. Rogers would love for all their customers to own their own equipment. The cost of refurbishing equipment and facilitating returns/exchanges through their retail stores is costly. Unfortunately the vast majority of Rogers customers liked to be coddled and hand held. Most customers who are not on these forums would be pissed if they were told by tech support to contact their modem retailer/manufacturer if they were experiencing issues.


elitefx

join:2011-02-14
London, ON
kudos:2

2 edits

1 recommendation

said by yyzlhr:

Most customers who are not on these forums would be pissed if they were told by tech support to contact their modem retailer/manufacturer if they were experiencing issues.

IMHO standalone modem issues are pure myth. 99.999% of name brand modems run rock solid forever on original factory issued firmware. For Rogers to blame "customer service requirements" as the reason behind their restrictive hardware usage policies is ridiculous.

This "modem swapping racket" Rogers engages in is nothing more than a smoke screen to protect incompetent CSRs, Rogers network failures, and as usual, making a fool out of their customers.

Oh, and did I forget to mention Rogers world famous firmware updates that manage to decimate every decent piece of hardware they come in contact with..........


yyzlhr

join:2012-09-03
Scarborough, ON
kudos:4

1 recommendation

said by elitefx:

said by yyzlhr:

Most customers who are not on these forums would be pissed if they were told by tech support to contact their modem retailer/manufacturer if they were experiencing issues.

IMHO standalone modem issues are pure myth. 99.999% of name brand modems run rock solid forever on original factory issued firmware. For Rogers to blame "customer service requirements" as the reason behind their restrictive hardware usage policies is ridiculous.

This "modem swapping racket" Rogers engages in is nothing more than a smoke screen to protect incompetent CSRs, Rogers network failures, and as usual, making a fool out of their customers.

Having worked in customer support for many MSOs including ones that allow 3rd party modems, standalone modem issues are certainly not a myth.

I do agree that Rogers should officially support, but NOT advertise their support of 3rd party modems. Only those who specifically ask about it should be told about the capability of using a 3rd party modem. This would produce a healthy balance of catering to both the tech savvy and non-tech savvy customer base.

Hooter

join:2009-08-17
Scarborough, ON

1 recommendation

What Rogers really needs to do is to support and authorize at least one good, decent stand alone D3 modem on their system. It has been explained to me that the reason Rogers is using only gateway modems is to make things "easier" for their customers. The theory seems to be that you simply hook up your gateway modem and you are done - kind of a no mess, no fuss type of logic. The customer who is not terribly literate when it comes to technology does not have to go through the so-called hassle of setting up their own router, since with the Rogers gateway, it is all done for you - one nice, neat package.

Now, if the gateways worked as advertised, all would be well. This is what it states on the Rogers Website regarding the Hitron.
-Our furthest reaching Wi-Fi modem, delivers maximum signal strength anywhere in the home with virtually NO dead zones!
-This is our best performing and most consistent Wi-Fi modem yet.
The problem though is that not only does the Hitron not work as advertised, none of the D3 modems are providing adequate wireless coverage within the home. So the irony, in the end, is that the customer who is using one of these gateways and is experiencing dropped connections and poor range, may have no clue what to do.

So, when they cannot get decent WIFI, they call Rogers. First, they are told to reboot the modem. Then they are told to try a direct connection if using wireless. (But Mr. Rogers, it is the wireless connection that I am concerned about.) Then they might be told to take the modem in and exchange it. At no time does a Rogers agent actually explain to the customer that the wireless component of the gateway is not very good and that the customer might need to have the modem placed in bridge mode and then have their own router hooked up. This would be admitting that their equipment is inferior and no way does Rogers want to do that. So in the end, what was supposed to make things easier for the customer has actually made things more difficult. By going on-line or talking to others, they may discover how to bridge the modem and use their own router. And of course they realize that they are now paying an extra $3 or $4 more per month for a modem that does not work properly.

Rogers continues to offer higher speeds and usage allowances for customers who switch to a D3 modem, but so far have not addressed the issue of the D3 modems which are far less than desirable when it comes to their performance as an "Enhanced Wi-Fi Modem".