dslreports logo
site
 
    All Forums Hot Topics Gallery
spc

spacer




how-to block ads


Search Topic:
uniqs
11
share rss forum feed


OldGrayWolf

join:2007-10-06
reply to Mina

Re: question about malicious software

said by Mina:

After it was all done and the OS was installed it just seemed to me that an unusual amount of hd space was missing.

How much was missing?

There is a difference in they way disk drive manufactures measure storage and the way software measures storage.

Mina

join:2003-01-04
Tucson, AZ

2 edits
Edit: I went and looked and it seems that the C:\ drive is showing a total of 698gb with 635gb available (the OS I assume). What I'm wondering about is the missing 50gb. The drive is 750gb but there is only 698gb on C:\?


norwegian
Premium
join:2005-02-15
Outback

Also the sales size of a drive, in this case 750GB is never the real figure of the size of the drive. Initially workablob See Profile suggestion is a good starting point.

It's in control panel - admin tools - computer management - storage (disk management)
--
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing - Edmund Burke


dsilvers

join:2009-05-17
Canyon Lake, TX
reply to Mina
said by Mina:

Edit: I went and looked and it seems that the C:\ drive is showing a total of 698gb with 635gb available (the OS I assume). What I'm wondering about is the missing 50gb. The drive is 750gb but there is only 698gb on C:\?

said by »www.petapixel.com/2012/10/10/why···ertised/ :

Humans think about numbers in base 10, the decimal numeral system, because we have 10 fingers and 10 toes. That’s why the parts of numbers are called “digits” — just like the parts of our hands and feet.

Computers, on the other hand, think in base 2, the binary numeral system.

Herein lies the root of the issue. The “brilliant” marketing gurus at data storage companies decided early on that all their products should be marketed in the decimal system, since that’s what consumers understand.

Therefore, one megabyte on their products is equal to 1,000,000 bytes, and one gigabyte is equal to 1,000,000,000 bytes. To a computer, however, a megabyte is 1,048,576 bytes and a gigabyte is 1,073,741,824 bytes.

Thus, for each gigabyte advertised in base 10, you’re actually receiving about 70 megabytes less than a gigabyte in base 2.

•750GB = 697GiB

Looks about right to me.